TH7608 - Evangelical Approaches to Biblical Hermeneutics

TH7608

Evangelical Approaches to Biblical Hermeneutics

7

20 CC   10 ECTS

Distance Learning; King's Evangelical Divinity School eCampus

None

Recorded lectures 10 hours
Generated study time 190 hours

Students have access to an online discussion forum to communicate with tutors and other students, along with e-mail support from tutors. Where appropriate, telephone support is also available.
Scheduled hours Placement Hours Independent Guided study
10 0 190

Core course material is noted as required in student courseware and typically includes recorded lectures and reading of select textbooks, papers or book extracts. All students are expected to listen to all of the course lectures and read the required materials. A range of supporting teaching material is also available to students as further recommended learning options

Audio lectures, guided reading, individual study, and individual support where appropriate. Students will prepare for assignments individually using interactive online learning material. Students are encouraged, but not required, to participate in online theological discussion on the eCampus Forum.

  1. Evangelicals and the Bible
  2. Evangelicals and Hermeneutics
  3. The Enlightenment
  4. Evangelicals and Modernism
  5. The Role of Biblical Theology
  6. Hermeneutics and Culture
  7. Modern Theories and the Reader's Role
  8. Post-modernism
  9. Contemporary Theologies and Hermeneutics

Other Liberative Theologies 

 

To develop systematic knowledge and understanding of hermeneutical theory with a particular emphasis on evangelical theology.

To enable students to develop advanced skills in study and research as well as original and independent thought in engagement with primary and secondary sources

To develop a comprehensive awareness of contemporary approaches at the forefront of hermeneutical practice.

To engage students in scholarly and critical analysis of current and new insights in the evangelical understanding of hermeneutics.

To encourage students to evaluate and engage with advanced scholarship that critiques evangelical approaches.

To encourage the application of original thought and research in the engagement of both nuanced and general approaches.

Audio lectures, guided reading, individual study, and individual support where appropriate. Students will prepare for assignments individually using interactive online learning material. Students are encouraged, but not required, to participate in online theological discussion on the eCampus Forum.

By the end of the module the students will be able to demonstrate

  1. A systematic understanding of historical and current approaches to evangelical hermeneutics
  2. A thorough knowledge of the defining characteristics of various opposing viewpoints in contemporary academic theory
  3. A solid grasp of wider matters of hermeneutics provided through guided and recommended reading.
  4. An ability to describe and critically discuss with confidence and originality the evolution of evangelical hermeneutics.

Component Weighting % Learning outcome(s) assessed Assessment category
15000 word essay100%1-4Coursework


 

 

As assessment

Bray, G. L. (1996). Biblical interpretation : past and present. Leicester: Apollos.

Corley, B., Lemke, S., & Lovejoy, G. (2002). Biblical hermeneutics : a comprehensive introduction to interpreting Scripture (2nd ed.). Nashville, Tenn.: Broadman & Holman.

Couch, M. (2000). An introduction to classical evangelical hemeneutics : a guide to the history and practice of biblical interpretation. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications.

Dockery, D. S., Mathews, K. A., & Sloan, R. B. (2004). Foundations for biblical interpretation : a complete library of tools and resources. Eugene, Or.: Wipf and Stock Publishers.

Erickson, M. J. (1993). Evangelical interpretation : perspectives on hermeneutical issues. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Books.

Goldsworthy, G. (2006). Gospel-centered hermeneutics : foundations and principles of evangelical biblical interpretation. Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Academic.

Kaiser, W. C., & Silva, M. (2007). Introduction to biblical hermeneutics : the search for meaning (Rev. and expanded ed.). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan.

McKim, D. K. (2007). Dictionary of major biblical interpreters (2nd ed.). Downers Grove, Ill.: Nottingham : IVP Academic ; Inter-Varsity Press.

Thomas, R. L. (2002). Evangelical hermeneutics : the new versus the old. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Kregel Publications.

Vanhoozer, K. J. (2009). Is there a meaning in this text? : the Bible, the reader, and the morality of literary knowledge (10th anniversary ed.). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Zondervan.

Patick Egan

TRS

Revalidation Panel

Tue, 02 Feb 2016

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