University of Chester

Programme Specification
History BA (Hons) (Single Honours)
2017 - 2018

Bachelor of Arts (Single Honours)

History

History

University of Chester

University of Chester

Parkgate Road, Chester Campus

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years (Full Time)

7 Years

Annual - September

V100

V100

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Arts and Humanities History and Archaeology

QAA History, 2014

N/A

History & Archaeology

Friday 1st March 2013

  1. To offer students a varied but coherent experience of the subject, including opportunities to acquire knowledge and deeper understanding of several different historical periods but also to specialise in one.
  2. To enable students to engage with the development of more than one country.
  3. To encourage students to reflect critically upon the nature of the discipline and to apply themselves to a variety of historical skills.
  4. To facilitate the development of a range of transferable and key skills.
  5. To contribute to strategies to fulfil the University's mission, including the promotion of excellence in scholarship, widening access, collaboration with employers (where appropriate) and the rigorous quality assurance policies.
  6. To enhance postgraduate opportunities in employment and research.

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will have knowledge of aspects of the history of Europe and the Wider World during the second millennium (HI4114)
  • Will be able to describe and explain the fundamental principles and concepts of the study of history (HI4112, HI4116)
  • Will be able to effectively draw upon information from a prescribed range of primary and secondary sources (all Level 4 modules)

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to identify and explain key issues, including those which have some level of complexity, relating to the study of history (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100)
  • Will be able to identify, find, and use effectively, a small range of source materials to supplement those which have been prescribed by the module leader (all Level 5 modules)

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to identify and explain in detail complex issues which are at the forefront of the study of history (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to identify, find, and use effectively, a wide range of source materials to supplement those which have been prescribed by the module leader (all Level 6 modules)

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to relate references to secondary source materials with their own ideas in their work (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to collate information and ideas to form a well-reasoned argument (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to interpret aspects of history within a prescribed context (all Level 4 modules)

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to integrate secondary source material effectively in their own work (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100)
  • Will be able to identify, collate, critically analyse, interpret, and justify the relevance of appropriate source information (all Level 5 modules)
  • Will be able to produce a well-reasoned argument supported by relevant evidence (all Level 5 modules)

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to integrate primary and secondary source materials effectively with their own ideas in their work (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to identify, collate, critically evaluate, and justify links between different types of source material (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to devise and sustain a coherent argument supported by relevant evidence (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to make sophisticated judgements, using critical analysis and evaluation, in relation to a particular argument (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to convey information clearly, using accurate English expression (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to adhere to word-count restrictions for assignments (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to reference sources in a consistent manner in line with the guidance provided (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to identify different approaches to the study of history (HI4112, HI4116).
    Will be able to identify and explain conflicting arguments within the study of history (all modules, particularly HI4112 and HI4116)
  • Will be able to use limited methods of historical enquiry (all Level 4 modules, particularly HI4112, HI4116)

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to convey complex information clearly and accurately, using appropriate English expression, grammar, and vocabulary (all Level 5 modules)
  • Will be able to reference accurately a range of different types of sources, in line with the guidance provided (all Level 5 modules)
  • Will be able to identify, explain, and use appropriately, relevant methods of historical enquiry (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100)
  • Will be able to understand and explore conflicting assertions and arguments, weighing and adjudicating between alternative positions (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100)
  • Will be able to analyse and solve straightforward problems by identifying, explaining and selecting appropriate approaches (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100)
  • Will be able to set goals and milestones within a given plan and implement a strategy to achieve several objectives (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5105)
  • Will be able to operate effectively within employment contexts that require the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making (HI5105)

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to convey, clearly and accurately, complex information and arguments, using appropriate English expression, grammar, and vocabulary (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to structure written work clearly and appropriately such that a clearly defined and sustained argument can be discerned (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to identify, critique, and justify the appropriate use of relevant methods of historical enquiry (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to critique conflicting assertions and arguments, and present a coherently reasoned, evidence-based evaluation (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to identify, analyse, and solve straightforward and complex problems by selecting, justifying, and using appropriate approaches (all Level 6 modules)
  • Will be able to create, implement, monitor, and evaluate a plan to achieve a limited number of agreed objectives (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to communicate information and ideas clearly, in a structured manner, both orally and in writing (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT in the presentation of information (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in communication (all Level 4 modules)
  • Will be able to work with others, meeting specified objectives and their own responsibilities (all Level 4 modules, particularly HI4112, HI4116)

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to communicate information and ideas clearly, orally and in writing, in a structured manner that demonstrates the development of an argument through to a rational conclusion (all Level 5 modules)
  • Will be able to use a range of forms of IT for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5105)
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT to enhance the communication of information (all Level 5 modules)
  • Will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in communication and identify their implications and relevance for personal development (HI5105)
  • Will be able to work with others, meeting specified objectives and their own responsibilities, using appropriate techniques for working with others (HI5100)

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to communicate more complex information and ideas clearly, both orally and in writing
  • Will be able to identify and use a range of IT resources for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to communicate in a structured manner that demonstrates the development of a sustained argument through to a rational conclusion (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to identify and use a range of IT resources to enhance the communication of information (all Level 6 modules)
  • Will be able to identify collective objectives and personal responsibilities within a group situation, and use and evaluate strategies to meet them (all Level 6 modules)

Preamble

The History Single Honours programme offers students a pyramidal structure, a phased progression from the broad to the particular, the general to the specialist.

LEVEL 4

History Single Honours students take three core modules: HI4114 (Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000), worth 20 credits, which introduces students to various themes and turning points from Europe and the Wider World during the last millennium; HI4112 (The Mystery of History), worth 20 credits, designed to encourage and embed a range of key transferable and subject-specific skills and methodologies; and HI4116 (Constructing History), worth 40 credits, which introduces students to various conceptual questions concerning the nature of the discipline and historical method.  Students also choose two optional modules from an annually compiled list, one from Group A (Medieval/Early Modern) and one from Group B (Modern), to allow for the sampling and enjoyment of the breadth and variety of the past in their first year. 

Level 4 Core Modules

HI4112 (The Mystery of History)

HI4114 (Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000)

HI4116 (Constructing History)

Level 4 Optional Modules

Group A (Medieval and Early Modern)

HI4106 (The Shaping of Britain)

HI4117 (The Crusades, 1095-1204)

HI4118 (Martyrs, Missionaries and Mystics: The Age of Reformations, c.1450-1650)

HI4119 (Rebellion and Society in the Later Middle Ages)

Group B (Modern)

HI4102 (The Making of Modern Ireland, 1603-1923)

HI4110 (The Rise of Multicultural Britain: Race, Immigration and National Identity, 1837 to the Present)

HI4122 (The American Century: The United States, 1898-2001)

HI4123 (Spaces of Conflict: The First World War)

LEVEL 5

Level 5 reinforces and extends the skills and knowledge acquired at Level 4 with modules more focussed in terms of theme, time and region. In particular, Level 5 aims to develop students as independent learners through the core modules, HI5100 (Debates in History), worth 40 credits, and the summer term experiential learning module, HI5105 (Historical Research: Methods and Practice) worth 20 credits.  Both HI5100 and HI5105 encourage students to take ownership of their learning experience through control of their choice of topic and through the planning, organisation, research and delivery of their work. Students also choose three optional modules from an annually compiled list, each worth 20 credits, representing broad chronological epochs (medieval/early modern and modern).

Level 5 Core Modules

HI5100 (Debates in History)

HI5105 (Historical Research: Methods and Practice)

Level 5 Optional Modules (choose three)

HI5101 (Europe in the Age of Revolutions, 1789-1861)

HI5108 (Europe on the Move: Migration and Minorities, 1871 to the Present)

HI5110 (Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977)

HI5111 (The Holocaust)

HI5112 (The Making of England, 400-1066)

HI5113 (The Supernatural in the Early Modern World)

HI5115 (A Cradle of Capitalism?: Commercial and Consumer Revolutions across Europe, 1300-1500)

Study Abroad

For those students who wish, and meet the requirements, the History Single Honours programme offers the opportunity to undertake a study year abroad at one of the University's exchange institutions through the selection of the 120-credit optional module WB5008 (The Study Abroad Experience).   

LEVEL 6

Single Honours students take as a core module HI6100 (Dissertation), worth 40 credits, which further extends and develops their competence as independent learners, requiring students to engage in a sustained period of independent research and engagement with source material, to foster a full understanding of the relevant historiography and to produce an extended piece of written work.  Students also choose from an annually prepared list two optional modules (Special Subjects), each worth 20 credits, based upon a tutor's research specialism, which are  'paired' with a sources module, also worth 20 credits, thereby offering a more sophisticated, in-depth and challenging learning experience, where close familiarity with primary and secondary source material allow students to develop various transferable and subject-specific skills of historical method and practice.

Level 6 Core Module

HI6100 (History Dissertation)

Level 6 Optional Modules (choose two pairs)

HI6102 (The Crowd in History) & HI6115 (Historical Sources: The Crowd in History)

HI6118 (The Culture of Defeat: Weimar Germany and the Legacies of the First World War) & HI6119 (Historical Sources: Weimar Germany)

HI6128 (The Norman Conquest of England, 1066-1154) & HI6129 (Historical Sources: The Norman Conquest)

HI6130 (Piety, Penitence and Charity: Women in France and New France, c.1615-1683) & HI6131 (Historical Sources: Piety, Penitence and Charity)

HI6132 (English Landscape, Culture and Identity from 1800) & HI6133 (Historical Sources: English Landscape, Culture and Identity)

HI6137 (Healthy Spaces for Healthy Bodies: Medicine, Geography and the Human Environment) & HI6138 (Historical Sources: Healthy Spaces for Healthy Bodies)

HI6139 (Power, Ritual and the State: Court and Cities, 1363-1477) & HI6140 (Historical Sources: Power, Ritual and the State)

HI6141 (The Least Dangerous Branch?: The US Supreme Court and the Shaping of Modern America) & HI6142 (Historical Sources: The Least Dangerous Branch)

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
HI4002 4 Living with the Past : An Introduction to Archaeological Heritage 20 N/A
HI4004 4 Greeks, Etruscans, Romans & Celts: Introduction to European Classical Archaeology 20 N/A
HI4005 4 The Archaeology of the Sea and Seafaring in Britain and Ireland 20 N/A
HI4006 4 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology: from Egypt to Rome 20 N/A
HI4102 4 The Making of Modern Ireland, 1603-1923 20 Optional
HI4105 4 Red Menace?: The Rise and Fall of Communism in Europe 20 N/A
HI4106 4 The Shaping of Britain 20 Optional
HI4107 4 Living and Dying in the Middle Ages: Patterns of Belief 20 N/A
HI4108 4 Making and Remaking the German Nation, 1789-2000 20 N/A
HI4110 4 The Rise of Multicultural Britain: Race, Immigration and National Identity, 1837 to the Present 20 Optional
HI4111 4 The Black Death and the Cult of Remembrance 20 N/A
HI4112 4 The Mystery of History 20 Comp
HI4113 4 Discovery, Development and Domination: The United States, 1492-2001 20 N/A
HI4114 4 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000 20 Comp
HI4115 4 The Past in the Present: An Introduction to Heritage 20 N/A
HI4116 4 Constructing History 40 Comp
HI4117 4 The Crusades, 1095-1204 20 Optional
HI4118 4 Martyrs, Missionaries and Mystics: The Age of Reformations c.1450 – 1650 20 Optional
HI4119 4 Rebellion and Society in the Later Middle Ages 20 Optional
HI4120 4 The Making of Modern Western Medicine 20 N/A
HI4121 4 True North?: Historical Interpretations of ‘The North’ and ‘Northernness’ 20 N/A
HI4122 4 The American Century: The United States, 1898-2001 20 Optional
HI4123 4 Spaces of Conflict: The First World War 20 Optional
HI5005 5 Recreating the Past: Archaeological Heritage Interpretation 20 N/A
HI5100 5 Debates in History 40 Comp
HI5101 5 Europe in the Age of Revolutions, 1789-1861 20 Optional
HI5102 5 Europe in the Age of Absolutism and Enlightened Absolutism 20 N/A
HI5103 5 Renaissance and Reformation Europe 20 N/A
HI5105 5 Historical Research: Methods and Practice 20 Comp
HI5106 5 Crusade, Reform and Reaction: Europe in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries 20 N/A
HI5107 5 “A More Perfect Union”: The Constitution and Modern America 20 N/A
HI5108 5 Europe on the Move: Migration and Minorities, 1871 to the Present 20 Optional
HI5110 5 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977 20 Optional
HI5111 5 The Holocaust 20 Optional
HI5112 5 The Making of England, 400-1066 20 Optional
HI5113 5 The Supernatural in the Early Modern World 20 Optional
HI5114 5 Crime and Justice in Medieval England, 400-1500 20 N/A
HI5115 5 A Cradle of Capitalism?: Commercial and Consumer Revolutions across Europe, 1300-1500 20 Optional
WB5004 5 Learning in the Wider World 20 N/A
WB5008 5 The Study Abroad Experience 120 N/A
WB5101 5 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning 20 N/A
HI6008 6 Vikings 20 N/A
HI6100 6 History Dissertation 40 Comp
HI6102 6 The Crowd in History 20 Optional
HI6103 6 The English Revolution: Causes, Course and Consequences 20 N/A
HI6104 6 Revolution Politics, War and the Jacobites: The Emergence of Britain, 1688-1746 20 N/A
HI6108 6 England Under the Norman Kings 20 N/A
HI6109 6 Historical Sources: The English Revolution 20 N/A
HI6110 6 Historical Sources: Revolution Politics, War and the Jacobites 20 N/A
HI6114 6 Historical Sources: England Under the Norman Kings 20 N/A
HI6115 6 Historical Sources: The Crowd in History 20 Optional
HI6116 6 Cold War America 20 N/A
HI6117 6 Historical Sources: Cold War America 20 N/A
HI6118 6 The Culture of Defeat: Weimar Germany and the Legacies of the First World War 20 Optional
HI6119 6 Historical Sources: Weimar Germany 20 Optional
HI6122 6 Britain in the Age of Reform, 1867-1929 20 N/A
HI6123 6 Historical Sources: Britain in the Age of Reform 20 N/A
HI6126 6 Gritty City, Urban Wonderland: The Rise of the Modern Metropolis 20 N/A
HI6127 6 Historical Sources: Gritty City, Urban Wonderland 20 N/A
HI6128 6 The Norman Conquest of England, 1066-1154 20 Optional
HI6129 6 Historical Sources: The Norman Conquest 20 Optional
HI6130 6 Piety, Penitence and Charity: Women in France and New France, c.1615-1683 20 Optional
HI6131 6 Historical Sources: Piety, Penitence and Charity 20 Optional
HI6132 6 English Landscape, Culture and Identity from 1800 20 Optional
HI6133 6 Historical Sources: English Landscape, Culture and Identity 20 Optional
HI6136 6 Historical Sources: Vikings 20 N/A
HI6137 6 Healthy Spaces for Healthy Bodies: Medicine, Geography and the Human Environment 20 Optional
HI6138 6 Historical Sources: Healthy Spaces for Healthy Bodies 20 Optional
HI6139 6 Power, Ritual and the State: Court and Cities, 1363-1477 20 Optional
HI6140 6 Historical Sources: Power, Ritual and the State 20 Optional
HI6141 6 The Least Dangerous Branch?: The US Supreme Court and the Shaping of Modern America 20 Optional
HI6142 6 Historical Sources: The Least Dangerous Branch? 20 Optional

120 credits = Certificate of Higher Education
240 credits = Diploma of Higher Education
360 credits = Bachelors Degree with Honours

N/A

N/A

UCAS points:

120 UCAS points.
GCE A Level: 120 UCAS points from GCE A Levels of equivalent. Typical offer BBC/BBB. The Department requires one of the following subjects: Ancient History; Classical Civilisation; History; Politics; Sociology.
BTEC: BTEC Extended Diploma/ Diploma: merit profile plus one of the GCE A Level subjects listed above
Irish/Scottish Highers: BBBB, including History
International Baccalaureate: 28 points, including 5 in HL History
Access: Access to HE Diploma to include 45 Credits at Level 3, 30 of which must be at Merit (including 15 in History)
OCR:

OCR National Extended/Diploma: merit profile plus one of the GCE A levels listed above

 Extra Information:             Please note that we accept a maximum of 8 UCAS points from GCE AS Levels and that the Welsh Baccalaureate (core) and A Level General Studies will be recognised in our offer. We will consider a combination of A Levels and BTECs/OCRs.

The HSBS, 2014, inter alia comprises six substantive sections to guide the design, structure, content, delivery and assessment of History undergraduate degree programmes: Section 3 (The Historian's Skills and Qualities of Mind), Section 4 (Criteria for Content and Approach in Designing a Programme of Undergraduate Study), Section 5 (Progression), Section 6 (Teaching, Learning and Assessment), Section 7 (Assessment Criteria) while it concludes with Section 9 (Recommendations) which distils the benchmarks in the other sections.  The text in Sections 24a, 26 & 28 of this programme specification aligns the programme of study to the HSBS, 2014, both generally and specifically. 

 

Acknowledging, HSBS, §. 6.2-6.8 & 9.2, the programme uses a wide range of learning and teaching methods, including: lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, field trips and private study.  Specifically: 

  • Lectures - stimulate interest and provide a frame of reference for further study.
  • Seminars - facilitate discussion and debate on key ideas and research issues within the discipline.
  • Tutorials/workshops - provide opportunities for more personalised direction and hands-on experience and practical skills.
  • Fieldwork/field visits - provide opportunities for first-hand experience of historical sites and fieldwork.
  • Private study.

The Department is committed to a broad and varied assessment regime which is recognised as central to the student learning experience (HSBS, §. 6.12-6.18). Students at all levels undertake a series of written tasks, from document analyses (both seen and unseen, 500 and 1000 words, based on one document or a spread of them), book reviews, reports, essays (of 1000, 2000 or 3000 words), a dissertation of 7500 words and examinations of both one hour and one hour 15 minutes duration. The Department recognises the value and skill content (both implicit and explicit) of oral presentations which have become a significant assessment component for students. Oral assessment - either formative or summative - is now undertaken at all Levels and can take the form of an individual or group presentation of a topic or a reflective dialogue in which the students reflect critically upon their own research. 

Formative assessment is embedded at each Level. All assessment is targeted to the learning outcomes of each module and to the programme overall. All assessment feedback is linked to the stated learning outcomes of the relevant module, with effective communication a consistent requirement.

The successful graduate will possess effective skills in written and spoken communication, and the interpretation of texts. The graduate will be self-critical and reflective with a high level of skill in problem-solving, project management, IT and multimedia skills (including word-processing), collaborative learning and working to deadlines.

Areas of employment suitable for graduates include the civil and military services, the history and heritage industries, teaching, business, journalism, further historical research at higher degree level and many others for which the graduates' transferable skills make them fit for purpose.

The programme conforms to the University's policies and codes of practice on equal opportunities and diversity and widening access and participation.  By its very nature, the programme addresses questions of race, gender, disability and age throughout its syllabus and at all levels of study.  The Department is sensitive to the range of different educational needs required by students and thus coordinates its learning and teaching with Student Support & Guidance, in terms of study plans and various types of developmental advice, while its assessment regime is designed to evaluate a broad range of student skills and competencies.

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