University of Chester

Programme Specification
Mathematics MSc
2014 - 2015

Master of Science

Mathematics

Mathematics

University of Chester

University of Chester

Thornton Science Park

Postgraduate (Taught)

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

1 year

6 Years

Biannual - January - September

N/A

N/A

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Science & Engineering Mathematics

Not applicable for postgraduate awards

N/A

Mathematics Postgraduate Board

Thursday 1st May 2014

  1. provide students with opportunities to develop masters level skills and understanding in the framework of a programme whose main theme is Computational Applied Mathematics
  2. provide students with opportunities to develop mathematical skills in a wide range of areas including the development of an independent project
  3. provide the necessary skills and experiences that will enhance their chances of success in further study and employment


Knowledge and Understanding

demonstrate a reasonable understanding of the basic body of knowledge for the programme of study;
Thinking or Cognitive Skills

understand logical arguments, identifying the assumptions and conclusions made;

demonstrate a reasonable level of skill in comprehending problems, formulating them mathematically and obtaining solutions by appropriate methods;

present straightforward arguments and conclusions reasonably accurately and clearly;

Practical Skills

demonstrate a reasonable level of skill in calculation and manipulation within this basic body of knowledge;

apply core concepts and principles in well-defined contexts, showing judgement in the selection and application of tools and techniques;

use computers and software as appropriate in solving mathematical problems;

Key Skills

  • Communication
  • Application of Number
  • Information Literacy and Technology
  • Improving own learning and performance
  • Working with others
  • Problem solving


(from MSOR Benchmark)

Graduates will possess general study skills, particularly including the ability to learn independently using a variety of media which might include books, learned journals, the internet and so on. They will also be able to work independently with patience and persistence, pursuing the solution of a problem to its conclusion. They will have good general skills of time-management and organisation. They will be adaptable, in particular displaying readiness to address new problems from new areas. They will be able to transfer knowledge from one context to another, to assess problems logically and to approach them analytically. They will have highly developed skills of numeracy, including being thoroughly comfortable with numerate concepts and arguments in all stages of work. They will have general IT skills, such as word processing, use of the internet and the ability to obtain information (there may be very rare exceptions to this, such as distance learning students studying abroad in countries where IT facilities are very restricted). They will also have general communication skills, such as the ability to write coherently and communicate results clearly.

Transferable Professional Skills

(from MSOR Benchmark)

1. Graduates from programmes focusing on applied mathematics will have skills relating particularly to formulating problems in mathematical terms, solving the resulting equations analytically or numerically, and giving interpretations of the solutions;
2. Graduates from programmes focusing on statistics will have skills relating particularly to the design and conduct of experimental and observational studies and the analysis of data resulting from them;
3. conducting of a research project and effective reporting of the outcomes in a dissertation.

The University of Chester Department of Mathematics offers a curriculum with a focus on Computational Applied Mathematics and Statistics that seeks to achieve:

1. a distinctive experience in studying mathematics within a small, friendly and effective department
a) through the focus on computational applied mathematics
b) through flexible modes of learning and assessment, selected to meet the needs of students, the curriculum areas covered, and the University-wide aim of developing self-directed learners.

2. widening of access to higher education study of mathematics through the flexible postgraduate modular scheme in Mathematics

 The MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate are all available on admittance.

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
MA7001 7 Mathematical Modelling 20 Optional
MA7002 7 Calculus of Variations 20 N/A
MA7003 7 Research Methods and ICT for Mathematics 20 Optional
MA7004 7 Numerical Linear Algebra 20 Optional
MA7005 7 Integral Equations 20 Optional
MA7006 7 Numerical Methods: Convergence & Stability Theory 20 Optional
MA7007 7 Functional Analysis 20 N/A
MA7008 7 Differential Equations and Their Applications 20 Optional
MA7009 7 Transform Theory 20 N/A
MA7010 7 Difference Equations 20 N/A
MA7014 7 Delay Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems 20 N/A
MA7015 7 Stochastic Calculus, Stochastic Differential Equations and Applications 20 N/A
MA7016 7 Mathematical Ecology 20 N/A
MA7017 7 Fractional Differential Equations 20 Optional
MA7018 7 Partial Differential Equations 20 Optional
MA7021 7 Research Project Development in Mathematics 20 Optional
MA7023 7 Differential Geometry 20 Optional
MA7190 7 Research Dissertation 60 Optional

Postgraduate Certificate awarded for 60 credits, Postgraduate Diploma for 120 credits, MSc awarded for 180 credits (to include MA7190).
In any given year a resticted range of modules will be on offer. Some during twilight sessions, some during the daytime and some by negotiated attendance at tutorials. By varying the modules available in successive years both the part-time and full-time students will be provided with a range of options on which to build the components of their own personal study programme.

Please refer to the prospectus pages on the corporate website www.chester.ac.uk for the most recent data.

N/A

The teaching, learning and assessment strategy of the mathematics department at the University of Chester has been developed in support of our aim to to provide students with a high quality experience in their studies that will equip them for further study and/or employment while widening access to the study of mathematics at all undergraduate and postgraduate levels. We aim to support students by promoting study in an environment where academic staff are approachable and supportive and where students are encouraged to aim to produce work of a high standard regardless of their previous experience and performance. Our assessment strategy is designed to use a balance of well-chosen coursework and formal written examinations that provide students with opportunities to show their understanding and skill development and that promote equality of opportunity. We aim to continue to develop our teaching, learning and assessment through staff development activities, consultancy activities, and peer review (by internal and external reviewers).

Teaching and learning

In masters level modules, students are expected to take on significant responsibility for their own learning. Staff encourage students to interact both during and outside formal classes, and students are expected to take the initiative in raising points for discussion. Tutors provide extra help as required at the initiative of students. At this level there is an expectation that students will make use of books and other materials that go significantly beyond the work covered in lectures if they are to be really successful. Project work and coursework at this level involves significant individual investigations and clarity in presentation.

Assessment

Assessment in each module is selected with the aim that the form of assessment chosen should be the most effective way to assess students attainment of the learning outcomes of that module.

(Adapted from the MSOR Benchmark document)

Graduates will have subject-specific skills developed in the context of a very broad range of activities. These skills will have been developed to a sufficiently high level to be used after graduating, whether it be in the solution of new problems arising in professional work or in higher academic study, including multi-disciplinary work involving mathematics.

A number of subject-specific skills are to be expected of all graduates. Most of these will be formally assessed at some stage during the degree programme. However, it must be recognised that some are not necessarily susceptible to explicit assessment. Some pervade all mathematical activity and will be reflected in assessments focused on many areas of subject content.

Many of the subject-specific skills to be expected of all MSOR graduates are directly related to the fundamental nature of MSOR as a problem-based subject area - whether the problems arise within MSOR itself or come from distinct application areas. Thus, graduates will have the ability to demonstrate knowledge of key mathematical concepts and topics, both explicitly and by applying them to the solution of problems. They will be able to comprehend problems, abstract the essentials of problems and formulate them mathematically and in symbolic form so as to facilitate their analysis and solution, and grasp how mathematical processes may be applied to them, including where appropriate an understanding that this might give only a partial solution. They will be able to select and apply appropriate mathematical processes. They will be able to construct and develop logical mathematical arguments with clear identification of assumptions and conclusions. Where appropriate, they will be able to use computational and more general IT facilities as an aid to mathematical processes and for acquiring any further information that is needed and is available. They will be able to present their mathematical arguments and the conclusions from them with accuracy and clarity.

1. Graduates from programmes focusing on applied mathematics will have skills relating particularly to formulating problems in mathematical terms, solving the resulting equations analytically or numerically, and giving interpretations of the solutions;
2. Graduates from programmes focusing on statistics will have skills relating particularly to the design and conduct of experimental and observational studies and the analysis of data resulting from them;
3. Graduates from programmes focusing on operational research will have skills relating particularly to the formulation of complex problems of optimisation and the interpretation of the solutions in the original contexts of the problems.

Graduates from the MSOR area will have acquired many general skills honed by their experiences of studying MSOR subjects. All these subjects are essentially problem-solving disciplines, whether the problems arise within MSOR itself or come from areas of application. Thus the graduates experiences will be embedded in a general ethos of numeracy and of analytical approaches to problem solving. In addition, an important part of most MSOR programmes is to take theoretical knowledge gained in one area and apply it elsewhere. The field of application is often a significant topic of study in its own right, but the crucial aspect of the process is the cultivation of the general skill of transferring expertise from one context to another.

A number of general skills are to be expected of all MSOR graduates, though in some cases they are likely to be developed more in graduates from some programmes than others. Even more than in the case of the subject-specific skills, it must be recognised that some are not susceptible to explicit assessment and indeed some are better not assessed so as to avoid creating imbalances.

Graduates will possess general study skills, particularly including the ability to learn independently using a variety of media which might include books, learned journals, the internet and so on. They will also be able to work independently with patience and persistence, pursuing the solution of a problem to its conclusion. They will have good general skills of time-management and organisation. They will be adaptable, in particular displaying readiness to address new problems from new areas. They will be able to transfer knowledge from one context to another, to assess problems logically and to approach them analytically. They will have highly developed skills of numeracy, including being thoroughly comfortable with numerate concepts and arguments in all stages of work. They will have general IT skills, such as word processing, use of the internet and the ability to obtain information. They will also have general communication skills, such as the ability to write coherently and communicate results clearly.

The University is committed to the promotion of diversity, equality and inclusion in all its forms; through different ideas and perspectives, age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. We are, in particular, committed to widening access to higher education. Within an ethically aware and professional environment, we acknowledge our responsibilities to promote freedom of enquiry and scholarly expression.

The programme is delivered in English and provided the student has attained the defined standard there are no other cultural issues.

None

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