University of Chester

Programme Specification
Theology Mission and Evangelism FDA
2017 - 2018

Foundation Arts Degree

Theology Mission and Evangelism

Theology Mission and Evangelism (The Light Project)

University of Chester

The Light Project

Light Project base and training placements

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory, Distance, Work-Based inc.(practice / placement)

2 years f.t. or 3 years p.t.

5 Years

Annual - September

V690

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Arts and Humanities Theology & Religious Studies

Theology and Religious Studies ( October 2014  http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-theology-religious-studies.pdf) with adjustments made in reference to  QAA Foundation Degree Qualification Benchmark May 2010 (http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Foundation-Degree-qualification-benchmark-May-2010.pdf)

Theology & Religious Studies

Wednesday 18th March 2015

  • Provide students with a comprehensive background to the varied understandings and approaches to mission and evangelism and the theology underpinning them.
  • Develop students' understanding of and ability to critically engage in the debate over contemporary approaches to mission and evangelism.
  • Encourage practitioners who are both reflective and critical in their approaches; developing practical skills in theological & critical reflection in relation to missional and evangelistic contexts.
  • Provide students with a range of academic study skills equipping them to engage critically with received authorities, analysing and evaluating opinions from a variety of sources and capable of translating such learning into community mission and evangelism.
  • Develop students’ ability to critically analyse and engage with a variety of traditions and approaches to studying the Bible and Theology with a particular focus on application and communication in contemporary settings.
  • Encourage students to begin the process of continued professional development enabling them to become self-directive and life-long learners.
  • Provide a supporting and stimulating environment conducive to intellectual and spiritual growth where personal vocation and equipping for service in churches and community are encouraged.

On successful completion of the programme students will demonstrate:

An understanding and ability to recognise and articulate academically key theological, biblical and cultural debates within church ministry and its theology of mission and evangelism. Furthermore, they will recognise the complexity surrounding these key principles and demonstrate knowledge of the methods and issues of sensitivity associated with applying them within their chosen vocation or ministry.

Level 4

Evaluate the definition of and historical approaches to mission and evangelism and the theology of key Christian themes (TH4301, TH4304)

Gain knowledge and understanding of the stories and beliefs of the Christian faith through competence in skills of biblical studies, including exegesis, socio-historical factors, cultural studies and hermeneutics (TH4302, TH4303)

Foundations for critical theological reflection on the experience of placement (TH4312, TH4311)

Level 5

This level builds a critical understanding of elements of the Christian faith developing a better understanding of culture and therefore more about how individual communities relate in a meaningful way.

Contemporary culture, emerging culture and research methods (TH5311, TH5309, TH5307, TH5312, TH5313)

Impact of Biblical and Theological texts in contemporary Christian contexts (TH5302, TH5301)

 

 

On successful completion of the programme students will have achieved the following outcomes:


Develop their competence in philosophical, historical, systematic, phenomenological, empirical and social scientific methods and be able to evaluate their appropriateness and application in the context of ministry. Formulate a coherent argument with appropriate use of data and evidence and with an awareness of the implications of divergent views.

Level 4

Reflect critically on issues arising from practice (TH4312, TH4311)

Critical Understanding of mission and evangelism through Biblical Criticism (TH4302, TH4303)

Level 5

Understanding and interpretation of theological concepts and their application in contemporary mission and evangelism (TH5302)

Critically evaluate social trends and cultural features and their treatment within Theology (TH5309, TH5311, TH5313)

Developing research skills through critical reflection on contextual theologies (TH5301)

Evaluate strategy for future Practice (TH5312, TH5313)

 

 

On successful completion of the programme students will demonstrate qualities and transferable skills, such as those requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making necessary for employment. These would include communication, information literacy and technology, teamwork, problem solving, reflective practice leading to application of learning to personal and/or ministerial practice.

Level 4


Reflective evangelistic practice (tutor-led experience) including foundations of self-reflection (TH4304, TH4312).

Working as part of a team (TH4311)

Presentation skills using I.T. (TH4303, TH4302)

Level 5

Building on practice of self-reflection for continuous professional development (TH5307, TH5313)

Leadership skills (TH5307, TH5312)

Pioneering and church planting (TH5313)

Equipping others (TH5302)

Developing Interview Skills (Through Assessment) (TH5311)

Research/Audit skills (TH5312)

 

On successful completion of the programme students will learn to build effective, genuine relationships, where issues of faith and spirituality may be discussed with competence in evangelistic communication, e.g. understanding the audience; selective communication methods. Students will develop a range of communication skills including essay and report writing and audio and visual presentation.

Level 4

Building relationships through community engagement (TH4311, TH4312)

Communicating to specific people groups with relevance and sensitivity to the contemporary context (TH4304, TH4301, TH4302)

Communication through the use of technology such as IT and filmed presentation (TH4301, TH4303)

 

Level 5

Critical Reflection on communicating Christian themes in the contemporary context (TH5311)

Communication through Arts and Media (TH5309)

Convey ideas effectively through written reports, essays, portfolio and oral presentations including the use of technology. For example, filmed presentation with the use of Projected Slides and interview (TH5301, TH5311, TH5312, TH5307, TH5313)

Equipping and teaching others through preparation and presentation of Bible Study/Study Packs (TH5302)

 

The FdA Theology and Evangelism is completed in either a three calendar-year part-time mode of study or a two-year full-time mode, but can be completed in up to 5 years, depending on the student’s context. 120 Credits are required from level 4 (FHEQ Level C) to progress to level 5, and then a further 120 credits at level 5 (FHEQ level I) for the award of FdA. The course allows a clear progression from level 4 tutor-led study, to a more student-responsible learning experience in level 5.  

The work-based learning aspect of the course (Community Engagement and Reflective Practice) is designed to accommodate learning and assessment in the workplace, allowing students increasingly to take more responsibility for their own study, reflecting and analysing their own strengths, weaknesses and progression whilst in the field. Students will complete the course with experience of Christian ministry and evidence of their ability to apply their qualification to the workplace, better preparing and better qualifying them for employment within Christian contexts.  

The programmes aims (22 above) and programme learning outcomes (23 above) and the corresponding module learning outcomes have been written to match guidelines in the Framework for Higher Educational Qualifications in relation to Foundation Degrees.  Students will therefore demonstrate a knowledge and awareness of the concepts, principles and debate  surrounding historical and contemporary approaches to mission and evangelism informed by the following core disciplines: Theology, Biblical Studies, Culture and Communication.    

Throughout all aspects of the programme there is a necessity for students to comprehend and critically evaluate historical and contemporary approaches to mission and evangelism within a framework of their theological, biblical and academic foundations.  Students will be expected to develop an awareness and ability to critically evaluate such approaches within the context of contemporary culture and their own placement situation. Finally, all students will develop skills in communicating their results with structured and coherent arguments.  

They will also develop skills within their ministerial context:(http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Foundation-Degree-Characteristics.pdf)

The programme covers the essential features of a Foundation Degree as set out by HEFCE: employer involvement, development of skills and knowledge, application of skills in the workplace, credit accumulation and transfer, progression – within work and/or to an honours degree. Core-disciplines within the course are biblical studies (including applied biblical studies), theology and evangelism studies (including cultural and communication studies) which are applied in the workplace. These are reflected across the modules at both levels, providing a broad and informed overview of the complex theories in all of the core disciplines.  

Students will work within a missional or evangelistic context for the duration of the foundation degree. During this, students will be able to apply their academic study continuously into their work-based experience providing continuous critical reflection and application of their academic skills into the work environment. A key methodology for work-based learning will be the 'pastoral cycle', which starts with experience; and moves to action-planning through analysis and reflection, including theological reflection.  

The inclusion of additional training opportunities to support and enhance ministry such as first-aid and safeguarding children, young people and vulnerable adults provides a distinctive and balanced approach to continuing professional development within ministry.  

Students will be equipped to deal with the diverse situations they are likely to face in ministry and after their training, and will have an informed knowledge of the stages involved in processes that they may be responsible for beginning, but not qualified to continue, e.g. complex and serious child protection issues. Skills for Higher Education are embedded throughout the modules in level 4, and are further developed in level 5. These are laid out throughout the subject benchmark statements in 27 below. 

 

 

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
TH4301 4 Historical Approaches to Evangelism 20 Comp
TH4302 4 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism 20 Comp
TH4303 4 An Introduction to Biblical Studies 20 Comp
TH4304 4 Christianity, Culture and Communication 20 Comp
TH4311 4 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 2 20 Comp
TH4312 4 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 1 20 Comp
TH5301 5 Approaches to Christian Theology 20 Comp
TH5302 5 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism 20 Comp
TH5307 5 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3 20 Optional
TH5309 5 Creative Arts and Media in Mission and Evangelism 20 Comp
TH5311 5 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture 20 Comp
TH5312 5 Theological Approaches to Mission Strategy 20 Comp
TH5313 5 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 4 20 Optional

Level 4: 120 Credits
Level 5: 120 Credits
Cumulatively providing 240 Credits for the award of foundation degree.

  • All applicants will be interviewed.
  • Normal criteria for admissions are 140 UCAS points, of which 100 should be at GCE A Level.  
  • Other recognised qualifications include: BTEC National Certificate/Diploma, OCR National Diploma/Extended Diploma, Irish Highers/Scottish Highers, Advanced GNVQ, QAA recognised Access to HE Diploma, Open College Units or Open University Credits, NVQ Level 3, Advanced Modern Apprenticeship in an appropriate subject.
  • Evidence of learning undertaken at work (APL/APEL). Mature students without evidence of the above qualifications but with appropriate experience, will be required to demonstrate enthusiasm and aptitude for higher level study. Enthusiasm will be evidenced through interview and aptitude through the use of an appropriate academic task prior to or during interview. 
  • Active engagement in Christian Ministry required for Light Project partnership with churches and provision of Work-Based Learning.

Intermediate

In line with statements concerning intermediate higher education qualifications from the FHEQ, students who successfully complete the Foundation Degree in Theology and Evangelism will have studied and completed modules covering the 5 areas outlined as important to Theology and Evangelism; these are:

a) Christian Theology and its application to evangelism

b) Biblical studies and its application to evangelism

c) Spirituality and Culture

d) Mission

e) Continuous work-based learning

These module types are represented by a module at each level, for instance TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism and TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology are both categorised as ‘Theology’. These areas of the field of study of Theology and Evangelism will be applied in the wider context of their continuous work-based learning, in partnership with The Light Project and local churches. 

Through modules such as TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology and TH5312 Theological Approaches to Mission Strategy, students will explore the theological nuances between ‘Mission’ and ‘Evangelism’ and how the two disciplines have historically related and contrasted with each other. Students will better appreciate different doctrines of the Christian faith respectively, observing the effectiveness and appropriateness of different approaches to situations and the impact of divergent views on their field of study. 

The choice of a programme relating to a vocational career of evangelism provides the context for the development of a range of practical and transferable skills. Through their continuous work-based learning and assessment(s) they will develop skills in personal responsibility and decision making, for instance, as part of their continuous work-based learning they may be required to lead a team in a task or project. Reflection and assessment of work-based Learning is provided by TH4312 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 1, TH4311 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 2, TH5307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3 and TH5313 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 4. 

 

Foundation Degree 

The programme matches the FHEQ benchmark for Foundation degrees in the characteristics of the following link: http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Foundation-Degree-Characteristics.pdf

Employer involvement - As both an employer in the arena of evangelism and a programme provider, involved in course design, review and assessment, the Light Project is committed to providing students with the knowledge, understanding and skills that employers need.  

The Light Project already has experience of monitoring students within the workplace, and this is embedded in the programme. The FdA Theology and Evangelism integrates academic and work-based learning through close collaboration between the University, the Light Project, and local churches. The course is delivered at the Light Project and work-based learning is conducted with the Light Project, as well as local churches and faith organisations. The identified work of a community evangelist involves working in conjunction with local churches and other organisations to provide events, projects and activities as both a service to the community and a platform for dialogue between community members and the evangelist.  

Working within the Light Project, which already performs this function, as well as with local churches, will allow students to experience and build skills in these areas; 

Accessibility - The programme enables learners to 'earn and learn'. Using APL, which is discussed in the admissions section, the accessibility to the course is widened, and appeals to ‘new’ students, who may not otherwise be able to access higher education. Both previous academic and vocational experience can therefore be considered. An outline of two typical, but different, students is included with the admissions section with APL principles. 

The employment needs of the local churches and of evangelism charities, such as the Light Project, are not just a local need. They are reflected nationally and internationally in employment needs for this area of ministry, and graduates of the FdA might seek employment locally, nationally and internationally. The 'tools' students will require to develop and design more localised evangelism, are encouraged and enhanced on the course. 

Articulation and progression - One of the key aspects, or core values, of a community evangelist is to undertake reflective practice with a commitment to personal growth and development. The progression from level 4 to level 5 from a more tutor-designed to student-designed learning experience encourages this, and is a key feature of foundation degrees. A successful student will be able to undertake further educational or professional development. Students gaining this qualification will be of value both to employers seeking specifically trained evangelists, and various other employers through the provision of transferable skills. 

There is a clear progression route for successful students for level 6 and beyond in ministerial practice and/or more theoretical study. Successful students are offered a pathway to level 6 BA(Hons) programme at University of Chester, or could apply to other such institutions to join honours degree programmes at level 6. Progression into other institutions' level 6 programmes may involve the need for a bridge programme to ensure they are adequately prepared in the view of that institution. Progression is found in-line with TRS specific benchmark statements, and can be seen below in the relevant section.This progression is made explicit to students through the programme rationale and specification documents which will be included in programme handbooks;  

Flexibility – Scheduling is geared to the employment patterns of the students; the admissions procedures benefit from the experience of the TRS department in the full use of APE/CL. The Light Project and local churches collaborate together to offer accommodation and ‘the work place’ for the learning experience so that the programme can be offered within the reach of students. There is flexibility in what ‘local’ church means to the student. It is possible that this ‘local’ church can be local to Chester, or ‘local’ to the student’s home ministerial context. Supervision through the Light Project offers each student unique and flexible tuition, as well as a forum for discussion and feedback from their learning experience. 

Flexible delivery is open to students where the typical timetable is inappropriate or unrealistic. The programme can be completed in up to 5 years, with it typically being completed in a 2 calendar-year period. Candidates will come from a wide variety of backgrounds, and this is discussed in the admissions section of the document. Two typical, but different, examples of students on the course are included. APL and APEL will be actively encouraged, as further discussed in the admissions section. 

Partnership - This programme is delivered by The Light Project and validated by University of Chester. 

Knowledge, understanding and skills - There is a focus on learning within a work context, underpinned by both vocational and academic understanding. Learning outcomes are explicitly relevant to employers' needs. 

(For the FHEQ match of learning, teaching and assessment, see 28 below) 

 

TRS Benchmarks 

There are no national Subject benchmarks for level 5 TRS awards. However, the QAA Theology and Religious Studies Benchmark Statement (2014  http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/SBS-theology-religious-studies.pdf) details the range of subject knowledge (TRS Benchmark 3.1), the qualities of mind (3.2), and generic skills (3.4) acquired and developed in TRS degree programmes, and these can be mapped illustratively against modules in the programme.    

TRS Benchmark – subject knowledge 

i. A broadly based core, together with the wider context required for the subject area covered by the programme in question and specialised study in depth of some aspects of the discipline or field. This implies not just the mastery of data but also the setting of these data within a theoretical framework which includes critical analysis and debate about how to understand and structure the raw data into a coherent whole.  

ii. One or more religions, ancient and modern, including the origin, history and developed or present character of each: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture.

iii. The reading, analysis and interpretation of texts, sometimes in the original languages, particularly texts that have been sacred to one or more practising communities. This study will often focus both on the historical context which generated the text(s) and on hermeneutical questions concerning its (their) meaning and application for the appropriate community of believers in the present, or for other readers today: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies , TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism.

iv. Engagement with some of the major religious thinkers, prophets, teachers, ascetics, mystics, healers, or leaders through their extant work or subsequent influence: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3. 

v. The application of a variety of critical methods of study, often adapted from those of other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, to the study of texts, practices, religious communities as social and cultural entities, or other diverse art forms: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies , TH4312 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 1, TH4311 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 2, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3, TH5313 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 4   TH5312 Theological Approaches to Mission Strategy, TH5309 Creative Arts in Mission and Evangelism, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary.

vi. The history of the particular discipline(s) covered by the programme, including major theories, movements and thinkers: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism.

vii. Ethics, morality, and values. All religions have certain expectations in these areas, and the student will include them in study along with other aspects of the religion. Even if the religion is studied only historically, the values and problems for living as an adherent of the religion do not go unnoticed by the student: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture.

TRS Benchmark – qualities of mind 

i)          The ability to understand how people have thought and acted in contexts other than the students own, how beliefs, doctrines and practices have developed within particular social and cultural contexts and how religious traditions have changed over time; (a degree of ‘cultural shock’ may be involved in study of the past, as well as in the encounter of beliefs, doctrines and practices of contemporary others): TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5312 Theological Approaches to Mission Strategy. 

ii)        The ability to read and use texts both critically and empathetically, while addressing such questions as genre, context, perspective, purpose, original and potential meaning, and the effect of translation if the text is not read in its original language: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism. 

iii)      The appreciation of the complexity of different mentalities, social behaviours and aesthetic responses, and of the ways they have been shaped by beliefs and values, and conversely how beliefs, sacred texts and art forms have been shaped by society and politics: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies,  TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5309 Creative Arts in Mission and Evangelism, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture.

iv)       Sensitivity to the problems of religious language and experience, and to the issues of multiple conflicting interpretations of language and symbols, texts and traditions. Simplistic, literalising or doctrinaire explanations are less likely to be advanced by a student of TRS: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies,  TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5309 Creative Arts in Mission and Evangelism, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture.

v)         Appreciation of both the interconnectedness of and internal tensions within a system of beliefs and practices: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, and TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5312 Theological Approaches to Mission strategy. 

vi)       Basic critical and analytical skills: a recognition that statements should be tested, that evidence and argument’s are subject to assessment, that the interpreter’s role demands critical evaluation: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4302 Using the Gospel of John in Evangelism, TH4303 An Introduction to Biblical Studies, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology, TH5302 Using Pauline Studies in Evangelism, TH5312 Theological Approaches to Mission strategy

vii)     The ability to employ a variety of methods of study in analysing material, to think independently, set tasks and solve problems: TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH4312 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 1, TH4311 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 2, TH4307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture. TH5312 Theological Approaches to Mission strategy

viii)   The capacity to give a clear and accurate account of a subject, marshal arguments in a mature way and engage in debate and dialogue with respect for the opposite case or different viewpoint: All modules. 

 

TRS Benchmark – generic skills 

The Statement also lists the generic (transferable) skills acquired through the study of TRS.

These skills are developed and are reflected in the assessment criteria and in specific learning outcomes, leaning on the progression from level 4 to 5 to further their development, for example:

TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism: LO 4: Accurately communicate a structured and coherent argument with clear and accurate references using IT. 

TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication: LO 1: Demonstrate a critical understanding of the theology and principles underlying some key Christian Themes.  

TH5307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3: LO 3: Demonstrate an increasing ability to work independently, with skills in leadership.

TH5313 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 4: LO 3: Demonstrate an increasing ability to work independently; with skills in church planting and project initiation and development

TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology: LO 4: Formulate a coherent argument in essay form, with an appropriate use of data and evidence, sourced from both primary and secondary literature and with an awareness of the implications and scope for accommodating divergent views. 

TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture: LO 3: Demonstrate the ability to use relevant methodologies; plan, prepare and reflect on missional encounters with specific cultures, critically evaluating the appropriateness of different approaches.  

Skills such as self-discipline, self-direction and the ability to work with others are developed through the learning ethos of the Light Project, and specifically through formative learning methods such as class discussion, group seminars, presentations and assignment proposal development. Self-discipline and self-direction are particularly tested in modules directly involving work-based learning such as TH5307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3 and TH5313 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 4, where students are required to progress their development from TH4312 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 1 and TH4311 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 2. 

The course also seeks to develop practical skills that serve the profession, such as first aid and training for the safeguarding of children, young people and vulnerable adults. 

Key skills (identified by the Qualifications, Curriculum and Assessment Authority) of Communication, Teamwork, Problem Solving, Application of Number, Use of Information Technology, Improving Performance are developed within the programme and can be mapped against the modules. 

 

Subject specific skills – Theology and Evangelism 

The Light Project has also developed the core principles of Theology and Evangelism using work that has been developed with the National Occupational Standards (N.O.S.) for Youth Work (www.paulo.org.uk) as a reference point. 

ix) These core principles of Theology and Evangelism are assessed as part of the ongoing supervision meetings that are held with students as well as elements of other forms of assessment throughout modules: TH4304 Christianity, Culture and Communication, TH4312 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 1, TH4311 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 2, TH5307 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 3, TH5313 Community Engagement and Reflective Practice 4, TH5311 Evangelism and Contemporary Culture.

 

At level 4, learning is predominantly tutor-designed and guided, and students are supported in developing individual initiative and collaborative enquiry within this framework, which provides groundwork in critical reflection, subject-specific methods, transferable study skills and skills of accurate communication. The Foundation Degree structure ensures that there is opportunity to apply skills and knowledge in the work place, and also learn from experiences from the work place. 

At level 5, learning design remains largely tutor-guided with encouragement to work in collaboration with tutors and fellow-students, but with more opportunity for independent learning. There is opportunity for consolidation and development of appropriate study skills and for experiencing a wider range of appropriate methods of study, and opportunity to apply their learning and skills in the work place. 

Students experience a variety of teaching methods both to respond to individual learning styles, and to ensure that varied delivery takes place. In tandem with the ethos of a foundation degree particular emphasis will be placed on work-based activity learning, incorporating problem-solving. Skills of theological reflection and exegesis are introduced in level 4, and developed further in level 5. Students take more responsibility for their learning in level 5, through reflection on their own and others’ practice. Methods of teaching and learning will include: 

  • Work-based learning including projects, problem solving and real case study analysis
  • Literature search and review
  • Student-based research involving contact with employers and appropriate agencies
  • Formal lectures
  • Seminars, tutorials and workshops
  • Student-led presentations and group discussions
  • Self-directed learning
  • Role Play
  • Tutor-guided private study
  • Field Trips

The development of academic skills in the student are incorporated into the modules across both years, e.g. at level 4 TH4301 Historical Approaches to Evangelism, IT skills are developed through LO 3. At Level 5, TH5301 Approaches to Christian Theology develops skills of essay writing through LO 4. 

Skills for personal development planning are handled in tutorial meetings and relate to the SWOT analysis, and learning style exercises that students will complete. Progress is tracked through reflections, including theological reflections using the pastoral cycle. For example, reflections will focus development of perceived Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats from the SWOT analysis. There will also be regular group tutorials with opportunities to develop skills in collaborative learning and to learn to work effectively as a team.

 
The assessment strategy draws on validated practice in work-based learning and in TRS, and is achieved through many forms, providing a holistic view of how the student performs. These include: written essays, individual and group oral presentation, aural observations, theological reflection, gaining of practical/professional qualifications, advertisement production, group contribution, work-based learning. 

  • Knowledge and Understanding are assessed through (e.g.) facilitated group discussion with portfolio evidence, written assignments, oral presentations
  • Cognitive Skills are assessed through (e.g.) group performances of interpretations of scripture/messages, book review, theological reflection
  • Key Skills are assessed through (e.g.) management of an area of mission, mission development, written assignments
  • Professional Skills are assessed through (e.g.) acquisition of certificates e.g. first aid, portfolio evidence of application of study to their ministerial context(s)
  • Work-based learning is assessed through (e.g.) meetings with student & employer and tutor, progress file, critical reflection on issues resourced from progress file, oral presentation

 

Successful students will be able to: 

  • Demonstrate an informed understanding of the definitions and approaches to mission and evangelism and the contrasts between the two
  • Use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical analysis of issues within their ministry and to propose solutions to problems that arise within their ministerial context
  • Effectively communicate information, arguments and analysis in a variety of forms suitable to missional and evangelistic ministry to both specialist and non-specialist audiences
  • Undertake further training and develop existing skills of ministry as well as new ones, acquiring new competencies that will enable them to take significant roles and responsibility within Christian ministerial contexts

And will have:  Qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment in Christian ministerial contexts requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

In line with Descriptor for a higher education qualification at level 5 on the FHEQ: foundation degree  (see 4.12   http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/qualifications-frameworks.pdf)

 

 

Modules in the programme offer opportunities for addressing questions of gender, sexuality, race and religious identity. Pastoral and ministerial modules and projects may additionally address issues of age and disabilities. There are no confessional requirements for entry to or success in the programme. The TRS department actively and successfully addresses the University priorities regarding admissions, widening access and participation, equal opportunities and AP(E)L; and it offers individual academic support to all its students.

 

The programme applies critical, academic, thinking to vocational practice. While the programme validation does not carry any confessional requirements of itself, the students of the Light Project will be on placement for work based learning. Participating churches may apply confessional criteria for the purposes of placement.

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