University of Chester

Programme Specification
Chinese BA (Hons) (Combined Honours)
2017 - 2018

Bachelor of Arts (Combined Honours)

Chinese

Chinese

University of Chester

University of Chester

Chester Campus

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

Full-time - 4 years

7 Years

Annual - September

T100

T100

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Arts and Humanities Modern Languages

Language and Area Studies

Modern Languages

Monday 3rd June 2013

  • To provide opportunities for students to pursue the study of Chinese and related areas as a substantial component of their degree course through a programme which is intellectually stimulating and academically demanding.
  • To provide opportunities for the development of linguistic competence so as to enable students to become confident, independent users of Chinese in terms of comprehension and production of the spoken and written language.
  • To increase awareness of the mechanisms of language in order to support and enhance the acquisition of high level language skills.
  • To enable students to acquire substantial knowledge of and sensitivity to social, economic, political and cultural features of contemporary China and the Chinese speaking world.
  • To provide opportunities to pursue personal, academic interests in the area of Chinese studies, and to encourage autonomous learning, self-direction and research.
  • To provide students with the relevant descriptive terminology at the key levels of linguistic analysis - phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse.
  • To enable students to apply the linguistic tools to the analysis of spoken and written language in context.
  • To give students the confidence to collect, select, present, discuss, and analyse data which represents specific examples of language forms and functions.
  • To use a variety of modes of assessments to provide students with the broadest possible range of opportunities to present their knowledge, findings and analyses.
  • To provide opportunities, through study or work placements abroad, for an extended period of contact with Chinese language, society and culture, which will contribute to greatly enhanced linguistic abilities and greater understanding of significant aspects of life in China and beyond.
  • To foster students' personal development and employment skills, and to increase their intercultural awareness.
  • To develop expertise in transferable, vocational skills such as digital capabilities, improving own learning, effective oral and written communication in both English and Chinese, which will enhance employment prospects.

By the end of level 4 (Cert. HE) the learner will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  1. The grammatical concepts necessary to underpin the learning of Chinese (CH4000, CH4100)
  2. A wide range of grammatical structures underpinning effective and accurate use of the target language (CH4000, CH4100)
  3. A wide range of lexical items necessary to achieve effective communication in a variety of situations (All modules)
  4. A wide range lexical items related to the social, political and cultural areas of study within the programme (All modules)
  5. The functions and mechanisms of language required to support and enhance the acquisition of high level linguistic competence (CH4000, CH4100)
  6. Historical, and cultural issues in China and other Chinese-speaking countries (CH4112)
  7. Working environments and practices in China and other Chinese-Speaking countries (All modules)

 In CH4000, students will learn about 400 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 1-2: “have an excellent grasp of basic Chinese and can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.”

 

By the end of level 5 (Dip. HE) the learner will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  1. The grammatical concepts necessary to underpin the learning of Chinese (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111)
  2. A wide range of grammatical structures underpinning effective and accurate use of the target language (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111)
  3. A wide range of lexical items necessary to achieve effective communication in a variety of situations (All modules)
  4. A wide range of lexical items related to the social, economic, political and cultural areas of study within the programme (All modules)
  5. The functions and mechanisms of language required to support and enhance the acquisition of high level linguistic competence (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111)
  6. Social, economic, political and cultural issues in China and other Chinese-Speaking countries (CH4112, CH5102)
  7. Working environments and practices in China and other Chinese-Speaking countries (All modules)

 In CH5111, students will learn an additional 500 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 2-3: “can communicate in Chinese at a basic level in their daily, academic and professional lives. They can manage most communication in Chinese when travelling in China.”

 

By the end of the programme the learner will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  1. The grammatical concepts necessary to underpin the learning of Chinese (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH6301, CH6303, CH6306, CH6311)
  2. A wide range of grammatical structures underpinning effective and accurate use of the target language (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH6301, CH6303, CH6311)
  3. A wide range of lexical items necessary to achieve effective communication in a variety of situations (All modules)
  4. A wide range of lexical items related to the social, economic, political and cultural areas of study within the programme (All modules)
  5. The functions and mechanisms of language required to support and enhance the acquisition of high level linguistic competence (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH6301, CH6303, CH6311)
  6. Historical, social, economic, political and cultural issues in China and other Chinese-Speaking countries (All modules)
  7. Working environments and practices in China and other Chinese-Speaking countries (All modules)

 

In CH6301, students will learn an additional 600 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 3-4: “can converse in Chinese on a wide range of topics and are able to communicate fluently with native Chinese speakers.”

By the end of level 4 (Cert. HE) the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Application of grammatical structure and lexis. (All modules)
  2. Comprehension of a range of complex written and audio/audio-visual texts (All modules)
  3. Recognition and reproduction of register and style in written and spoken language (All modules)
  4. Effective writing in the target language and English (All modules)
  5. Synthesis and/or reformulation of source material (summary, report, etc.) in target language or English. (CH4000, CH4100)
  6. Skills in translation. (CH4000, CH4100)

In CH4000, students will learn about 400 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 1-2: “have an excellent grasp of basic Chinese and can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.”

By the end of level 5 (Dip. HE) the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Application of grammatical structure and lexis. (All modules)
  2. Comprehension of a range of complex written and audio/audio-visual texts (All modules)
  3. Recognition and reproduction of register and style in written and spoken language (All modules)
  4. Effective writing in the target language and mother tongue (All modules)
  5. Synthesis and/or reformulation of source material (summary, report, etc.) in target language or English. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111)
  6. Skills in translation. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111)
  7. Oral skills in discussion, debate and presentation, in the target language. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111)

In CH5111, students will learn an additional 500 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 2-3: “can communicate in Chinese at a basic level in their daily, academic and professional lives. They can manage most communication in Chinese when travelling in China.”

By the end of the programme the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Application of grammatical structure and lexis. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH6301, CH6303, CH6306, CH6311)
  2. Comprehension of a range of complex written and audio/audio-visual texts (All modules)
  3. Recognition and reproduction of register and style in written and spoken language (All modules)
  4. Effective writing in the target language and mother tongue (All modules)
  5. Synthesis and/or reformulation of source material (summary, report, etc.) in target language or English. (All modules)
  6. Skills in translation. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH6301, CH6303, CH6311)
  7. Oral skills in discussion, debate and presentation, in the target language. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH6301, CH6303, CH6311)

In CH6301, students will learn an additional 600 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 3-4: “can converse in Chinese on a wide range of topics and are able to communicate fluently with native Chinese speakers.”

By the end of level 4 (Cert. HE) the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Competence in effective collaboration with peers (CH4000, CH4100, CH4112)
  2. Exercise of initiative and personal responsibility (all modules)
  3. Autonomous reflective learning. (CH4000, CH4100)

By the end of level 5 (Dip. HE) the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Competence in effective collaboration with peers (CH4000, CH4100, CH4112, CH5111, CH5102)
  2. Self-reliance, adaptability and flexibility. (CH5200, CH5000, ML5000, WB5101)
  3. Exercise of initiative and personal responsibility (all modules)
  4. The ability to engage in a variety of transactional situations (relating to applying visa, accommodation, enrolment at university, banking, etc) (CH5200, CH5000, ML5000)
  5. Autonomous reflective learning. (CH4000, CH4100, CH4112, CH5111, CH5102, CH5200, CH5000, ML5000, WB5101)

 By the end of the programme the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Competence in effective collaboration with peers (CH4000, CH4100, CH4112, CH5111, CH5102, CH5200, CH5000, ML5000, WB5101, CH6301, CH6303, CH6306, CH6311)
  2. Exercise of initiative and personal responsibility (all modules)
  3. Self-reliance, adaptability and flexibility. (CH5200, CH5000, ML5000, WB5101)
  4. The ability to engage in a variety of transactional situations (relating to visa application, accommodation, enrolment at university, banking, etc.) (CH5200, CH5000, ML5000)
  5. Autonomous reflective learning. (CH4000, CH4100, CH5111, CH5200, CH5000, ML5000, WB5101)

By the end of level 4 (Cert HE) the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Proficiency in language and communication skills in both English and the target language (all modules)
  2. Competence in effective collaboration with peers (all modules)
  3. Writing skills, including the selection of appropriate format, style and register, structuring an argument, referencing. (All modules)
  4. Oral skills, including debate, discussion and presentation with use of appropriate visual and other support materials (all modules)

In CH4000, students will learn about 400 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 1-2: “have an excellent grasp of basic Chinese and can communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information on familiar and routine matters.”

By the end of level 5 (Dip HE) the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Proficiency in language and communication skills in both English and the target language (all modules)
  2. Competence in effective collaboration with peers (all modules)
  3. Writing skills, including the selection of appropriate format, style and register, structuring an argument, referencing. (All modules)
  4. Oral skills, including debate, discussion and presentation with use of appropriate visual and other support materials (all modules)

In CH5111, students will learn an additional 500 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 2-3: “can communicate in Chinese at a basic level in their daily, academic and professional lives. They can manage most communication in Chinese when travelling in China.”

 

By the end of the programme the learner will demonstrate:

  1. Proficiency in language and communication skills in both English and the target language (all modules)
  2. Competence in effective collaboration with peers (all modules)
  3. Writing skills, including the selection of appropriate format, style and register, structuring an argument, referencing. (All modules)
  4. Oral skills, including debate, discussion and presentation with use of appropriate visual and other support materials (all modules)

In CH6301, students will learn an additional 600 Chinese words, phrases and relevant grammar points. Students will reach equivalent HSK (Chinese proficiency test) Level 3-4: “can converse in Chinese on a wide range of topics and are able to communicate fluently with native Chinese speakers.”

STRUCTURE DIAGRAM CHINESE COMBINED

CORE

OPTIONS (all 20 credits)
LEVEL FOUR

CH4000 Mandarin Chinese Beginners (40 credits)

Or

CH4100 Additional Development of Mandarin Chinese (40 credits)

 

CH4112 Chinese Culture and History (20 credits)

 
LEVEL FIVE

CH5111 Mandarin Chinese Intermediate (40 credits)

 

Students may choose to take the option below or an optional module from their other subject: 

  1. CH5102 Chinese Culture and Society

Students will then take one module from:

  1. CH5200 China Short Study or Work Placement
  2. WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning
  3. ML5202 International Employability Project
  4. ML5210 Introduction to TESOL/TEFL

PLACEMENTS ABROAD (Year Abroad Placement Module CH5000) or Year Abroad split between two languages (Split Year Abroad Placement ML5000)

A Year Abroad module is compulsory for students of equal and major Chinese.  

Short-term study placement

Volunteer languages teachers

Work placement

LEVEL SIX

 

  •  CH6301 Advanced Chinese Studies (20 Credits)

 

 

 

 

 

Students Minoring in Chinese:

  • CH6303 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese)
  • CH6311 Chinese for Business

Students taking Chinese as an equal subject

  • CH6306 Chinese Dissertation
  • CH6303 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese)
  • CH6311 Chinese for Business

Note: Students must take either CH6306 on its own or a combination of CH6303 and CH6311

 

Students majoring in Chinese

  • CH6306 Chinese Dissertation
  • CH6303 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese)
  • CH6311 Chinese for Business

Note: students must take CH6306 and either CH6303 or CH6311

 

The programme is structured to provide Combined Honours students with the core knowledge and understanding of the key principles, concepts and methods of study in Chinese Language and Linguistics, and options to specialise as they progress through the programme.

At level 4, students take core language modules CH4000 Mandarin Chinese Beginners (40 Credits) or CH4100 Additional Development of Mandarin Chinese (40 Credits) if students have completed Chinese A level or equivalent HSK test level, and a core area study module CH4112 Chinese Culture and History (20 Credits). The two core modules provide students with a solid grounding knowledge in Chinese language and subject area studies.  For students who have previously completed a Chinese A level, or equivalent HSK test level, CH4100 Additional Development of Mandarin Chinese replaces CH4000 Mandarin Chinese Beginners. The module aims to significantly expand vocabulary and oral and written fluency, and extend student capacity in all four language areas (speaking, listening, writing and reading) of contemporary Chinese.

At level 5, students take CH5111 Mandarin Chinese Intermediate (40 Credits) which builds on the linguistic knowledge and abilities acquired at Level 4. Through the study of the stimulus material (aural, written and visual), students will gain further linguistic proficiency. In addition, to complement the core, they are offered one optional module worth 20 credits, CH5102 Chinese Culture and Society.

The final weeks of Level 5 are devoted to work-based or experiential learning. Students of Chinese may choose WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning, ML5210 Introduction to TESOL/TEFL, ML5202 International Employability Project or CH5200 China Short Study or Work Placement. CH5200 provides an initial opportunity for a placement in a China-related organisation in the UK or China. The placement will normally last between 7 and 12 weeks.

On completion of Level 5, major and equal students normally undertake a one-year placement CH5000 Year Abroad Placement in China.  Students of two languages may divide the year between two countries by taking module ML5000. Students combining Chinese with French, German or Spanish may spend one semester studying at a partner university within the Erasmus exchange programme. Alternatively they may undertake a suitable work placement, subject to approval by the Programme Leader. Students who are studying Chinese may spend the other semester at a Chinese partner university (minimum of six months). In addition, they may also undertake a suitable work placement in China, subject to approval by the Programme Leader. In the course of level 5, prior to the placements abroad, students are given guidance and advice in the form of meetings, tutorials and documentation. A student handbook, up-dated each year, which deals with administrative procedures and gives practical advice, is issued and, where possible, tutorial visits from departmental staff take place at an appropriate point in the year. In order to successfully complete the year abroad, all students must submit assignments of a pass standard. Students at European partner universities are also required to follow a suitable programme of modules and pass 20 ECTS credits. Employer evaluations are received as part of the assessment for work placements.  

Students who have already spent at least a year in a Chinese-speaking country may be granted accreditation for prior experiential learning (APEL) and exempted from the placement.

Students for whom a year would be problematic owing to family commitments or health reasons might be exempted, and be granted APEL, on condition that alternative arrangements, such as a period of residence in China and a language course during the summer holidays, can be arranged. Any requests for exemption will be examined individually, taking into account the student's academic needs as well as personal circumstances. Any students who are exempted will be required to produce one project of the type undertaken by students on placements abroad (see module descriptor CH5000) to be submitted at the start of their level 6 studies. Such students will normally take Chinese as their minor subject at level 6. However, if they so wish, they may choose to take Chinese as equal or even major subject. Guidance will be provided by the Department regarding the advisability of making that choice, taking into account, above all, the best interests of the student.

At Level 6, all students must take one core module CH6301 Advanced Chinese Studies. In addition, students minoring in Chinese may also take either CH6303 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese), or CH6311 Chinese for Business; students taking Chinese as an equal subject may take either CH6306 Chinese Dissertation on its own or a combination of CH6303 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese) and CH6311 Chinese for Business; students majoring in Chinese, may take CH6306 Chinese Dissertation and either CH6303 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese) or CH6311 Chinese for Business.

This structure ensures that all students continue to work on advanced linguistic skills as well as theoretical and analytical skills, whilst giving them the opportunity to choose options that enable them to focus on areas of particular interest. Through independent project work, students have opportunities to examine a range of study areas, underpinned throughout by core language modules. The structure and content require students to take responsibility for their own learning and to engage progressively and increasingly in autonomous study.

 

Combined Honours only
Mod-Code Level Title Credit Major Equal Minor
CH4000 4 Mandarin Chinese Beginners 40 Comp Comp Comp
CH4100 4 Additional Development of Mandarin Chinese 40 Comp Comp Comp
CH4112 4 Chinese Culture and History 20 Comp Comp Comp
SO4703 4 Comparative Politics 20 N/A N/A N/A
CH5000 5 Year Abroad Placement 120 Optional Optional N/A
CH5102 5 Chinese Culture and Society 20 Optional Optional Optional
CH5111 5 Mandarin Chinese Intermediate 40 Comp Comp Comp
CH5200 5 China Short Study or Work Placement 20 Optional Optional Optional
CH5211 5 Chinese for Business (2) 20 N/A N/A N/A
ML5000 5 Split Year Abroad Placement 120 Optional Optional N/A
ML5202 5 International Employability Project 20 Optional Optional Optional
ML5210 5 Introduction to TESOL/TEFL 20 Optional Optional Optional
SO5703 5 Global Politics and International Relations 20 N/A N/A N/A
WB5101 5 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning 20 Optional Optional Optional
CH6301 6 Advanced Chinese Studies 20 Comp Comp Comp
CH6303 6 Translation Techniques and Application (Chinese) 20 Optional Optional Optional
CH6304 6 Extended Translation from Chinese 20 N/A N/A N/A
CH6305 6 Chinese Special Study 20 N/A N/A N/A
CH6306 6 Chinese Dissertation 40 Optional Optional N/A
CH6311 6 Chinese for Business (3) 20 Optional Optional Optional
SO6704 6 Security and Insecurity in World Affairs 20 N/A N/A N/A

  • LEVEL 4 - The acquisition of 120credits at level 4 will qualify the student for the award of Certificate in Higher Education.
  • LEVEL 5 - The acquisition of 240 credits, of which at least 120 are at level 5, will qualify the student for the award of Diploma in Higher Education.
  • YEAR ABROAD PLACEMENTS - Students successfully completing the one-year placement abroad (or who are granted APEL on the basis of equivalent experience) will be awarded 120 credits.
  • LEVEL 6 - The acquisition of 120 credits at level 6, giving a TOTAL of 480 CREDITS will qualify the student for the award of BA Combined Honours Chinese (with another subject). Students who do not undertake the year abroad, and who are not granted APEL on the basis of equivalent experience, will, on completion of level 6, achieve a total of 360 credits for the programme and will qualify for the award and of BA Combined Honours Chinese Studies (with another subject).

[See also comment in section 23 referring to students of Chinese and another language.]

The Department teaches Chinese from beginner's level, and no prior language knowledge is required. However, entry to the programme requires good results at A-Level or in an equivalent examination.

The normal requirement for admission to the programme is currently:

112 UCAS points

Typical offer - BCC/BBC at A Level.

BTEC : DMM

IB Diploma: 26 points

Access to HE Diploma

Applicants must also have GCSE English Language and a modern foreign language at grade C or above.

The programme embraces the defining principles expressed in the languages and Related Studies benchmarking statement, up-dated in 2015. Those 'benchmarks' or characteristics of the graduates in Languages and Related Studies are reflected in the learning outcomes (see section 26 below), demonstrated through a range of assessment tasks (see section 28 below) and are mapped across the programme as a whole, enabling the programme team to match the standards set by the benchmark.

1. All graduates of the Modern Languages programme will have acquired and developed explicit knowledge of and skills in their chosen language through the different levels of the programme. They will have practical competence in the main skills of reception and production, and some skills in mediation between English and the target language. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired, in particular, through the core language modules.

2. All students will have acquired knowledge of culture, communities and societies where their chosen languages are used and demonstrate intercultural awareness and understanding. Those skills and that knowledge will typically have been acquired through the core and option modules during residence abroad.

3. Graduates of the programme will, in addition to the knowledge and skills closely related to the study of their chosen subject, also have acquired the generic skills (cognitive, practical and interpersonal) described in the next section of this document. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired through the core and option modules.

4. Students will have developed their skills through an integrated process of learning, involving a range of classroom activities (largely in the target language), appropriate specialist coursework, and independent study and learning. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired through the core modules and in particular in residence abroad.

5. Thanks to a period of residence abroad, students of Chinese as equal subject will have benefited from opportunities to develop their linguistic competence in an authentic context and to consolidate their cultural knowledge and understanding. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired through modules: CH5000, CH5200.

6. They will have made substantial use of appropriate educational technology, including video, multi-media and computing facilities, and will have benefited from access to electronic as well as conventional printed texts. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired through core and option modules and in the course of residence abroad.

7. The acquisition of competence in the target language will have enhanced the students’ ability to engage in types of textual analysis that will have enabled them to acquire knowledge and understanding of cultural, political, economic or business areas relevant to the societies they study. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired through core and option modules.

8. At the higher levels of the programme, students will be expected to demonstrate powers of reflection, interpretation and conception. These higher analytical skills will be necessary to achieve upper second or first class honours. Those skills and knowledge will have been acquired through, among others, all level 6 Modules.

9. A range of appropriate assessment methods will have been used to measure the students’ knowledge and competence in the language and related areas.

10. The graduate in Combined Subjects Chinese will thus have been involved in a range of challenging linguistic and intellectual activity, will have developed a high level of learner autonomy, and acquired a range of useful transferable skills.

Students experience a variety of methods of teaching and learning which are related to the acquisition of knowledge and understanding and to the development of language skills and any skills as described above. The language classes are primarily in workshop mode, emphasising group and pair work, which promotes student-centred learning and a high level of in-class participation. Sessions cover a range of activities which permit work on many aspects of language learning. Each student is encouraged to be a full participant in the learning process, with the tutor, much of the time, serving as facilitator. In order to maintain interest and stimulate learning, the activities and materials employed are varied. Given the considerable availability of recorded material and facilities for recording (DVD and audio), extensive use is made of this medium, complemented and supplemented by written texts. Interactive software and multimedia resources are also integrated into the programme. Expertise on the use of such materials is provided within the Department.

Learning and Information Services (LIS) also have an important input in the area of skills development, particularly IT related, across the University. As regular practice is fundamental to effective language learning, students are encouraged to use the listening, viewing and IT facilities in the department as well as the reading materials that are available. They also make use of the IT facilities across the University, using the internet and intranet (SharePointPortal). The extensive range of learning support materials for the programme stored on SharePointPortal can also be accessed off campus, facilitating working from home. The Department has two computer-based language laboratories and audio-visual rooms which support independent as well as class-based learning and enable the Languages teams to incorporate greater use of the above activities in the classes and in students' independent learning time. An important element of the programme at levels 4 and 5 is the integration of the student's e-portfolio in the learning process. This fosters independent learning and self-direction and feeds directly into the assessment process (see section 28).

The content modules such as those on Chinese Culture and History, are delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, and student-led seminars. Guidance and support for seminar presentations, essays, and other items of assessed coursework is provided in the form of individual or group tutorials.

Students, of course, learn a great deal from each other, in particular in collaborative projects such as seminar preparation and presentation. In developing their abilities to interact, communicate, and to present information, they will acquire crucial skills for employment or for further study.


The assessment strategy for this programme is to ensure that students engage in a variety of assessment tasks at each level in order to demonstrate their achievement of the full range of learning outcomes, and to provide opportunities for formative assessment and feedback. In terms of core language modules, the linguistic challenge of similar types of task (a translation, presentation or written essay, for example) increases as the student progresses through the levels. Assessments also match increasing levels of learner autonomy and students' ability to reflect on their learning. A wide range of forms are used: oral presentations and discussions, translations, written reports, summaries and discursive essays, listening tests, close analysis of texts, fieldwork, individual oral exams, written exams, class tests, independent supervised essays and translations and, in some cases, dissertation. This range of assessments permits a thorough evaluation of student attainment and comprehensive feedback at the different levels of the programme. Throughout the process, both proficiency in understanding and communicating in target language, where appropriate, and subject content (for example, of cultural, social, political or linguistic issues) are evaluated. In the content modules, the assessment regime enables students to focus 50% of their assessment on a particular research topic.

At all levels, the submission of assignments is spread across the academic year and submission dates are planned to avoid undue bunching by using assessment grids. Formative assessment and feedback are part of an ongoing process throughout the programme. The Department of Modern Languages has developed a range of tasks-specific criteria sheets, used across the language and content modules, the purpose of which is to ensure transparency and consistency of marking and to make students more aware of how their assignments are evaluated. The criteria sheets cover each type of assessment task, including those of the placements abroad. Each criteria sheet has a corresponding cover sheet on which students are required to provide a self-evaluation of their work. They also serve as feedback sheets with additional comments provided by the tutor and a further page is used after feedback to encourage reflection and target setting.

The process thus assesses progressively throughout the programme the whole range of skills and knowledge the students can be expected to acquire. It covers their comprehension of written and recorded sources, their ability to synthesise, their accuracy and fluency of expression in both written and target language. The process also assesses skills in presentation and structure, and in translation and summary.  The ability to engage in personal research and present the findings in writing and orally is assessed, in particular, through projects undertaken in the course of residence abroad and in the independent study modules at level 6. Much of the oral assessment takes place in the language workshops in the form of presentations and debate.

Assessment of the short placements abroad, towards the end of level 5, is based on the submission of a project and reflective essay which demonstrate the students' knowledge and understanding of a particular topic or aspect of their working environment as well as their inter-cultural awareness and the ability to analyse their own learning experience. For the whole-year placements, students are required to produce two projects on subjects of topical interest: national, regional or local. The two projects demonstrate progression as the first project is mainly in English.  Once students become more familiar with Chinese language and culture, they will be able to submit the second project in target languages. Students must also submit a personal development portfolio (PDP) which consists of a self-assessment of skills, initial objectives expressed as SMART targets, a reflective learning log, in the target language, of their experience abroad, and a reflective summary of the overall experience. The PDP is submitted online, in regular instalments, via their progress file. Students at partner universities must also follow a suitable programme of modules, and provide proof of their attendance by means of a signed certificate as well as obtaining credit.

The section on benchmarking (section 27) clearly describes the attributes that a Language graduate will have acquired. The commentary below reflects and expands upon that section.

  1. Students successfully completing the programme will have acquired a range of high-level skills in Chinese. These will typically include: the ability to understand items of complex written or spoken language and effectively convey the information or important elements of the information there in, orally or in writing; the ability to translate complex texts in an appropriate style and register with a high degree of accuracy; the ability to present topics orally in a clear, coherent and structured manner and respond effectively to questions in the target language, the ability to successfully discuss or debate, in the target language, subjects of a topical or controversial nature; the ability to plan and produce, in the target language, written argument of high quality in terms of accuracy, fluency, structure, coherence and content on a range of academically demanding subjects.
  2. In addition to these specific language-related skills, students will have demonstrated their competence in undertaking independent research, using a range of skills to collect, interpret, synthesise and effectively present information and comment in written form or orally (in the target language or English) on relevant subjects from the area of cultures and societies studied.
  3. They will have acquired detailed knowledge and understanding of relevant cultures and politics and in some cases, business contexts. They will be able to show a critical awareness of some of the important historical and cultural factors that have shaped contemporary societies studied and be able to demonstrate a degree of informed critical judgement. Thanks to the period(s) of residence abroad they will have acquired inter-cultural awareness and capability.
  4. They will have acquired an ability to read texts closely and carefully and to make connections and comparisons across the range of their reading. They will possess knowledge which will enhance their ability to interpret different ideas and values represented in different types of texts. They will also be able to appreciate the importance of scholarly standards of presentation and of writing accurately, clearly and effectively.
  5. Graduates of the programme will have acquired skills relevant to a range of professional contexts, including, of course, those for which high level language skills are a requirement, and will be more likely to find employment outside the UK.
  6. In addition, students will also have gained additional skills needed in the interpretation, analysis and evaluation of different types of textual (and other) material.

The University of Chester values the diversity of its student body and aims to promote equality of opportunity in all its activities. All suitably qualified students are welcome on this programme, irrespective of the protected characteristics of age; disability; gender reassignment; marriage and civil partnership; pregnancy and maternity; race; religion or belief; sex. Every effort will be made to accommodate students with specific learning or physical needs and to ensure that all students benefit equally. Each case will be examined individually and the University Learning Support Plans will provide guidance and support as appropriate in, for example, support provision in lectures, examination and research, specialist equipment and funding applications (Disabled Students Allowance). On campus the programme is delivered in the Binks Building which is fully accessible.

International students, from continental Europe and beyond, who meet the admissions requirements are welcome and will enrich both the programme and the learning community at the University. Specific support and guidance for international students is provided in particular through the International Student Welfare Officer.

All students are issued with a comprehensive Programme Handbook and a Module Handbook at the commencement of each module. Students needing further advice are welcome to consult the Programme Leader (who acts as the Personal Academic Tutor for students on the programme), or the Module Tutor.

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