University of Chester

Programme Specification
Youth Work BA (Hons) (Single Honours)
2016 - 2017

Bachelor of Arts (Single Honours)

Youth Work

Youth Work (JNC)

University of Chester

University of Chester

Chester Campuses

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory, Work-Based inc.(practice / placement)

3 years full-time

7 Years

Annual - September

L513

L530

Yes

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Education & Children's Services Academic and Professional Programmes

QAA Benchmark Youth And Community Work 2009;

The professional National Occupational Standards for Youth Work 2012;

NYA/ JNC Endorsement criteria (until May 2017)

JNC: Joint Negotiating Committee through the National Youth Agency (NYA) 

Department of Applied Professional Programmes (APP) in the Faculty of Education and Children's Services

Tuesday 27th January 2015

The Programme aims to:

  • Offer a professional and vocational training and degree qualification in Youth Work, endorsed by the National Youth Agency as a professional JNC Youth Work training programme.
  • Address the Subject Benchmark In Youth Work (and Community Studies) 2009.
  • Align with the Professional National Occupational Standards for Youth Work 2012.
  • Prepare students for vocational and professional practice in a range of professions related to work with young people - Youth Centres, Juvenile Justice, Voluntary and Secular Youth Agencies, Faith-based organisations.
  • Develop understanding of the concepts and principles of Youth Work, work with young people and including a critical appreciation of their relevance to young peoples’ needs in a variety of contexts.
  • Develop intellectual skills appropriate to Youth Work, young people, contexts and approaches.
  • Develop a range of practical skills appropriate to Youth Work and working with young people in a variety of contexts and settings, including the making of critical judgements relative to the needs and constraints of context.
  • Encourage students to develop inclusive and anti-oppressive practice in their own settings as well as in the wider social context of education and integrated service approaches to work with young people.
  • Equip students with the ability to deal with complex ethical issues through sound moral reasoning, including an understanding of how values are explored and expressed in informal and formal contexts.
  • Draw on and extend current thinking and practice in relation to the development of knowledge and understanding, skills and abilities, and personal values and commitment.
  • Offer opportunities for students to audit, evaluate, interpret and enhance their own and other's skills within the context of Youth Work and the wider social and political context of work with young people.
  • Develop skills in a number of complementary methods of study, such as, social hermeneutics and discourse, empirical, speculative, and social scientific.
  • Develop transferable skills such as communication; formulating and evaluating a coherent argument, the appropriate use of data and evidence, the awareness of the implications of divergent views; the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making; resolving problems and making decisions in contexts involving some complexity.
  • To offer a Programme in full-time and part-time modes.
  • Qualify students for admission to Postgraduate Programmes.

Knowledge and Understanding

Level 4: knowledge of key concepts and principles of Youth Work, including an appreciation of their relevance to a particular context, and an ability to evaluate and interpret them. This knowledge and understanding is drawn from classroom, private study and from work experience. ED4901, ED4902, ED4904.

Level 5: the ability to demonstrate an understanding of the concepts and principles of Youth Work, including a critical appreciation of their relevance to specific contexts – and to evaluate and interpret these with recognition of their complexity. For example, students will have a knowledge of the history and development of Youth Work since 1945 (an NYA requirement), as well as a sound knowledge of the principles underlying personal and social education, group work, informal education, community action, Equal Opportunities and Diversity, policies, procedures, ethics and legalities relating to young people and the Youth Work curriculum – applicable to secular, voluntary and faith-based contexts. This knowledge and understanding is drawn from classroom, private study and from work experience. ED5901, ED5902, ED5903, ED5904, LA5009.

Level 6: detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the subject, with reference to advanced scholarship and with an appreciation of uncertainty and ambiguity. This will include an understanding of the concepts and principles of Youth Work, including a critical appreciation of their relevance to charitable, cultural, faith-based, secular and voluntary organisations and an evaluation and interpretation with recognition of their complexity; understanding of the expectations of employing bodies, the impact of social policy, and the links between these. This knowledge and understanding is drawn from classroom, research and work experience. ED6901, ED6902, ED6904, ED6005, Optional module.

Thinking or Cognitive Skills

Level 4: demonstrate basic intellectual skills appropriate to Youth Work and contextual reflection, including the evaluation of the appropriateness of different approaches to problem-solving in these areas and an open and questioning approach to familiar and new material. ED4103, ED4901, ED4902, ED4904, ED4103.

Level 5: the ability to demonstrate their competence in intellectual skills appropriate to Youth Work and contextual reflection, including the evaluation and demonstration of the appropriateness of different and potentially conflicting approaches to problem solving in these areas. For example, students will be able to demonstrate a critical understanding of the educational techniques and interventions employed in Youth Work, the relational, support and educational role of the youth worker, the role of the worker in managing workers and teams, and an ability to reflect critically (professionally and personally) upon their own and other's experience. ED5901, ED5902, ED5903, ED5904

Level 6: application of a number of complementary methods of study, such as, philosophical, phenomenological, empirical, speculative, and social scientific; apply these methods to review, consolidate and extend their knowledge and understanding; Intellectual skills appropriate to Youth Work and contextual reflection, including the evaluation and demonstration of the appropriateness of different and potentially conflicting approaches to problem solving in these areas; reflection on their personal development in relation to issues within Youth Work and personal beliefs and values in variety of contexts. Ed6901, ED6902, ED6904, ED6005, Optional module.

Practical and Professional Skills

Level 4: the ability to demonstrate basic practical skills and the application of knowledge appropriate to Youth Work and contextual reflection, including the making of sound judgements relative to the needs of context. Demonstrate basic skills of auditing, evaluating and interpreting their own skills within the context of Youth Work and contextual reflection. ED4103, ED4904, ED4901, ED4902, ED4103.

Level 5: the ability to demonstrate a range of practical skills and the application of knowledge appropriate to secular, faith-based and voluntary sector Youth Work contexts, including the making of critical judgements relative to the needs of context. For example, students will have a proven ability to assess and respond appropriately to individual needs, manage a range of intervention techniques and initiate and implement developmental work relative to group, community and cultural context. Practical skills in group work, listening skills, working with individuals, designing learning programmes, identifying and responding to need. ED5904, ED5901

Level 6: the ability to demonstrate a range of practical skills and the application of knowledge appropriate to Youth Work in secular and voluntary sector contexts, including the making of critical judgements relative to the needs of context. The ability to use resources in order to identify and retrieve source material, inform others and enhance presentations. The ability to use information technology (IT) and computer skills for data capture, to identify and retrieve material and support research and presentations. an ability to plan and manage in a manner appropriate to context; Develop skills appropriate for project, programme and curriculum development; management and organisation skills related to projects, staff and Youth Work development. The ability to exercise personal responsibility and involvement in decision-making processes; resolve problems and make decisions in contexts involving some complexity. ED6902, ED6901, ED6904,

  • Lifelong learning, reflective practice, personal development.
  • Decision making, resolving conflict and problems of some complexity.
  • Identifying and addressing need, project development, critical reflection and analysis. 

Communication skills:

Level 4: The ability to communicate accurately and demonstrate appropriate use of primary and secondary sources, with appropriate references, within a structured and coherent argument; demonstrate ability to develop non-verbal, oral, written, presentation and listening skills. IT supported presentations, internet knowledge, IT data retrieval, general IT literacy. Identify and begin to practice skills to communicate with a wide variety of individuals and groups in a variety of ways. ED4103, ED4901, ED4902, ED4103, ED4904,

Level 5: The ability to formulate a coherent argument, with appropriate use of data and evidence, and with an awareness of the implications of divergent views; audit, evaluate, interpret and enhance their own and others’ skills within the context of Youth Work and contextual reflection, communicate the results of their study in a variety of forms and with full and accurate references and with accuracy and coherence, as well as identifying the broader principles, issues and implications involved; Ability to communicate with a variety of individuals and groups in a variety of ways. ED5904, ED5901, ED5902, ED5903,

For example, students will have a range of communication (active and passive) techniques, planning and evaluative skills; Students will also exercise and develop written and oral skills, relational, supportive and supervisory skills, critical and reflective skills, and those necessary for project development and teamwork.

Level 6: The ability to use library resources in order to identify and retrieve source material, compile bibliographies, inform research and enhance presentations. Development of projects and assignments which sustain and evaluate an argument, largely through independent enquiry and which draw on a range of scholarly resources including research articles and primary sources; Demonstrate a sound ability to communicate with a wide variety of individuals and groups in a variety of ways including team work, intervention, advocacy, designing and enabling learning, training others, and management and supervisory skills. Project planning, aspects of finance, statistics, fundraising. ED6901, ED6902, ED6904, ED6005, Optional module.

Key Skills: Communication, Application of Number, Information Literacy and Technology, Working with Others, Problem Solving.

The BA in Youth Work offers students both the opportunity to study for a JNC endorsed qualification and to develop an understanding of wider opportunities of professional work with young people in a variety of related areas. The over-arching structure of this three year Programme has been designed to incorporate key values, skill sets and principles necessary for professional accreditation (JNC framework and Professional National Occupational Standards) and facilitate best pedagogical practice (FHEQ and wider requirements). Taken together, every element of the Programme design also embodies the core accepted values of contemporary professional Youth Work: relationships; informal education; Equal Opportunities; employability; voluntary attendance and advocacy.

Beyond these guiding philosophies, the framework of the three year Programme can be seen to rest upon four complementary and interlocking themes: a) Youth Work theory and practice; b) Understanding of young people, their needs, growth and development; c) Legal, social and professional contexts; d) Fieldwork practice / placements. These themes form the central 'pillars' of a spiral approach to the curriculum (Bruner): the structure of the curriculum and ordering of each of the individual modules will allow students to re-visit and reflect on each of the fundamental areas at every stage, gaining deeper understanding and specialism at each level. Such design also ensures that core professional skills can be practised and developed throughout the Programme and that there are multiple opportunities for cross fertilisation and reinforcement between modules. A simplified version of the BA Youth Work Programme Map is shown below. Guided by key principles and standards the needs of Young People are central to the programme and begin with modules focussing on Working with Young People and Understanding Young People. There are links between modules laterally and progression between levels; level 4 to 6 is supported by a practice based Fieldwork Placement.

 

L6

ED6901  Management & Organisational Practice

from ED6904 Youth Work Independent Study

ED6904 Youth, Education & Society

Optional Module. e.g. Child Law, NELM, PE & Youth Sport, TRS.

ED6902 Fieldwork   Placement 3

 L5

 ED5902 Managing Teams & Workers

 ED5901 Working with People  Ed5903 Context, Concerns & Culture  LA5009 Current Issues in Youth Justice  ED5904 Fieldwork Placement 2
 

 

       
 L4  ED4103 Safeguarding and Child Protection  ED4901Working with Young People  ED4902 Understanding Young People  ED4110 Self Review and Transition to Higher Education  ED4904 Fieldwork Placement 1
       Needs of Young People    
   Principles & Values of Youth Work  National Occupational Standards  Relationships  Common Core  ECM

 

 Levels 4 and 5 are entirely comprised of core modules. Each of the modules, however, offer opportunities for student reflection (in line with the principles outlined above) and opportunities for students to draw upon their professional experience, where relevant through processes of reflection, application and exploration. At Level 6, 100 credits are core due to professional requirements integral to the study. Students choose one option from a range of topics - from Education, or where the schedule permits it from Law or TRS. These optional modules include, for example, LA6004 Child Law and TH6046 Religion and Culture. SS6105 PE & Youth Sport.

Modules from different departments and Faculties within the Programme may have a different amount of contact time. In addition, hourage reflects the experiential nature and pedagogical approaches of the Programme.

Fieldwork Placements

At Levels 4 and 5  fieldwork placements are for each student, of a different nature: typically one in a voluntary organisation and one in a secular placement. Critical reflective practice of self in situ as well as the context is a requirement all placements and thus students are able to explore organisational aims, values and professional approaches in context as well as reflect on personal growth and development gained from the experience of both settings.

At Level 6 the double Fieldwork Placement module is a longitudinal placement, part-time from October to April, which also affords opportunity for critical analysis of self in situ and a critical evaluation of the agency leading to recommendation for change and development for the future. These placements utilise a range of skills to plan and facilitate the personal, social, educational development of young people together, at level 6, with the opportunity to plan an event or training session related to work with young people e.g. training staff / volunteers and thus further develop skills in organisation, planning, leadership and teamwork.

The Fieldwork Placement modules at each level provide for 300 hours of placement-related work: at each level at least 150 hours is face-to-face with young people aged between 13-19. The total hourage over the 3 levels fulfils the minimum JNC requirement of 888 hours.

Part time students will share the same experience as full time students. The Programme team will ensure the relevant tutor is available to students for PAT meetings, tutorials and other supportive mechanisms as appropriate. All available opportunities to bring full and part time students together will be utilised for teaching, tutorial support and specific areas of the Programme.

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
ED4103 4 Safeguarding & Child Protection 20 Comp
ED4110 4 Self-Review and Transition to Higher Education 20 Comp
ED4901 4 Working with Young People 20 Comp
ED4902 4 Understanding Young People 20 Comp
ED4904 4 Field Work Placement 1. 40 Comp
ED4905 4 Understanding Child and Adolescent Development 20 Comp
ED5901 5 Working with People 20 Comp
ED5902 5 Managing Teams and Workers 20 Comp
ED5903 5 Contexts, Concerns and Culture 20 Comp
ED5904 5 Field Work Placement 40 Comp
ED5905 5 Youth Study & Project 40 N/A
LA5009 5 Current Issues in Youth Justice 20 Comp
ED6005 6 Youth, Education and Society 20 Comp
ED6901 6 Management and Organisational Practice 20 Comp
ED6902 6 Field Work Placement 40 Comp
ED6904 6 Youth Work Independent Study 20 Comp
IS6011 6 Negotiated Experiential Learning Module (single) 20 Optional
LA6004 6 Child Law 20 Optional
LA6021 6 Youth and Crime Dissertation 20 Optional
SS6105 6 PE and Youth Sport 20 Optional
TH6046 6 Religion and Culture: Transformations of British Religious Life (1960-2010) 20 Optional

Level 4, 120 credits at level 4 entitles the student to a Certificate of Higher Education exit award Cert H.E. in Youth Studies (this is an academic award only, not professionally endorsed)

Level 5, 240 credits at Level 5 entitles the student to a Diploma of Higher Education exit award Dip H.E. in Youth Studies   (this is an academic award only, not professionally endorsed)

Level 6, 360 credits at Level 6 entitles the student to a Bachelor’s degree BA Honours in Youth Work (JNC endorsed)

Derogations are required for All Fieldwork Placements. ED4904, ED5904, ED6902. It is a JNC requirement that the Fieldwork Practice component of the placements must be completed and passed satisfactorily, and any 'Fail' of the practice aspect of the placement cannot be compensated with marks from other components in these modules.

There is a JNC requirement of 80% attendance for all classroom based modules in the programme.

All students must agree to and sign a Code of Conduct - which relates to their conduct as a student on a professional and vocational programme and to their conduct and professionalism whilst on their fieldwork placements.

All students must undergo DBS checks to the satisfaction of the university. 

 

Accreditation for Prior Experience and Learning (APEL) / Accreditation for Prior Learning (APL)

For JNC validated BA Youth Work Programmes: 

Accreditation of prior learning (APL) refers to the accreditation of prior formal learning including
assessed fieldwork practice. The Programme therefore:  

 ·        Only accepts tangible and assessable evidence, such as copies of certificates or transcripts, of a similar level of attainment in a comparable programme of study in an equivalent institutional setting;

·         Allows advanced standing into level 4 or 5 of a BA Programme, only on condition that evidence clearly supports a level of professional formation equal to that of students on the Programme they are entering.

 Academic learning:

·         Obtained by completing modules within a JNC Programme or by demonstrating academic understanding from completing related academic study, so that by the end of the third level they have met the full curriculum requirements of the Programme and Youth Work is evident at each level of student learning.

  • Professional practice: has completed field practice on another JNC validated Youth Work.

 APEL refers to the accreditation of prior experiential learning that has not been formally assessed within credit bearing programmes but is the result of work and life experience. This is not permitted for advanced standing at Level 4 and 5 of this JNC validated Programme.

Admission to the beginning of professionally validated Programmes through the accreditation of prior experiential learning (APEL) is valid, valuable and encouraged

Fieldwork placement practice components must be passed and cannot be compensated with other academic components.

888 hours of Assessed Fieldwork practice during the course of the programme.

All fieldwork modules must be completed and passed - fails in the Practice element of the fieldwork modules cannot be compensated by other written / academic elements of these modules.

80% Attendance at classroom based modules

Restrictions on APEL & APL.

'JNC' must be included on the final university award certificate. 

An interview is required which will also involve a small written exercise and a presentation exercise.

A typical applicant will be in the range of 240 - 280 UCAS points, of which 160 - 200 points must be obtained from GCE A Levels, including a grade C in one subject.

The remaining points may be achieved from GCE AS Levels, or Level 3 Key Skills BTEC National Diploma/Certificate: pass/merit profile OCR National Extended Diploma/Diploma: pass/merit profile Irish Highers/Scottish Highers: C in 4 subjects International Baccalaureate: 24 points QAA recognised Access to HE Diploma, Open College Units or Open University Credits The Advanced Diploma: acceptable on its own.

These are the formal entry requirements but we welcome applications from students without the formal requirements but who nevertheless have an interest in and an aptitude for the Programme, Students will need to demonstrate a commitment to youth work values and practice, a desire to work with young people and show previous experience of working with young people in an out of school setting - preferably in a youth centre, youth club, youth project or youth agency. Applicants need not have a qualification in Education or Law, although they need to be able to demonstrate their interest in Youth Work values and principles.

All suitable applicants will be interviewed. They must have worked for a period of time with young people in the 13-19 age-range, and this means on-going involvement, not just an occasional session, over a period of time, prior to starting the Programme. As a professional Youth Worker, they will need to show their commitment to the value-base of Youth Work, an open attitude, a willingness to listen, learn and critically reflect, as well as showing a commitment to build on their experience.

All applicants are required to be in possession of a satisfactory Disclosure and Barring Service Enhanced Disclosure at the beginning of the Programme.

Admissions procedures and policies are consistent with other professional Programmes in the Faculty of Education and Children's Services, for example, the use of a standard pro-forma for the initial scrutiny of the UCAS application form; the use of a standard pro-forma to record the outcomes and decision making process of the interview process. We encourage Placement Supervisors to participate on interview panels.

The entry point for students will be September.

The delivery campus is Riverside, Chester.

 

The Youth Work programme is an applied academic and an integrated programme equipping its students with the requisite skills-base in Youth Work. The BA in Professional Youth Work is structured with reference to a number of 'benchmark' statements. The Programme Aims and Learning Outcomes and the corresponding module learning outcomes have been written to match guidelines in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

The credits of the awards match FHEQ guidelines. Levels 4, 5 and 6 are FHEQ levels C, I and H. Youth Work.

The most relevant ‘benchmark’ relating to Youth Work is the QAA Benchmark for Youth Work, Community Education and Development (2009). This  benchmark statement has informed the development of the Programme, for example with respect to placements, inter-agency work, management focus at Level 6 and research element at Level 6.

The Programme and student learning is also mapped against the National Occupational Standards for Youth Work 2012. 

The programme is endorsed by the National Youth Agency (JNC) as a professional training programme.

These bench marks, standards and the JNC endorsement all reflect similar requirements that have been mapped and incorporated into the programme in order to gain JNC endorsement.  

The programme is mapped against these benchmarks and statements, and are key in the gaining the understanding, knowledge and skills required for professional practice. 

The programme and its values also relate to European qualifications in non-formal, education, social pedagogy and animation.

The Key values, principles and ethics include for example:

Work with adolescents, adults and other agencies, with groups as well as individuals - to develop young people's social, educational and personal development - and the identification of and responses to needs and aspirations through trusting interpersonal relationships.

That young people choose to be involved, not least because they want to relax, meet friends, make new relationships, to have fun and to find support. The work starts from where young people are - yet seeks to widen their horizons, promote participation it encourages young people to participate and be partners in their learning process and encourages self-determination.

It treats young people with respect, values individual differences, promotes understanding of others, while challenging oppressive behaviour and ideas. The programme engages with debates about the ethical dilemmas raised in professional practice, in doing so it also engages with the key principles of the NYA's Ethical Conduct in Youth Work (NYA 2004).

  It is concerned with how young people feel and not just what they know or can do. It encourages young people to participate in their learning process and the decisions that affect them and encourages self determination.

All of the values and principles outline above and in the benchmark statements refer to participation, inclusion, empowerment, partnership and learning as fundamental principles of practice.

The Youth Work programme is characterised by its attention to values, principles, purposes and processes. The programme modules, including fieldwork practice, are integrated and together designed to develop skills, values, understanding of work with young people. The development of trusting interpersonal relationships, which is central to professional practice, requires a high degree of autonomy, responsibility and ethical conduct. Therefore an essential part of the programme is reflective practice on self and self in situ.

The programme adheres to the central University Learning and Teaching Strategy. From this, the Faculty of Education and Children’s Services have developed a local level response in the form of the Faculty Learning, Teaching, Assessment Improvement and Development Plan. This commits to pedagogical principles which include:     

  • Promoting professional engagement and reflective practice;      
  • Encouraging independent and autonomous learning;         
  • Supporting continuing professional development;     
  • Valuing students' professional experience and prior learning;        
  • Supporting diversity and personalised learning;       
  • Encouraging dynamic and participative learning;
  • Promoting collaborative learning;
  • Encouraging Internet and Web-based approaches;         
  • Supporting reflective and Practitioner enquiry.

For further details, please access:

https://portal.chester.ac.uk/lti/Documents/UOCLearningandTeachingStrategy.pdf

The programme includes a range of approaches to learning and teaching:

  • University-based Modules- These modules are held at the University in technology rich environments. A range of methodologies are employed which take account of best practice and maximise active learning, sensitive to the learning styles and needs of students. These methodologies include lectures, seminars, group work, directed tasks, independent research and individual, group tutorials and blended learning.
  • Independent Learning -Independent Learning is a philosophy of education which students are encouraged to adopt. It includes the opportunity to work with a supervising tutor who offers support as students work towards completing assessment tasks but is fundamentally a more over-arching concept about an autonomous approach to work.
  • Electronic Support Materials - The Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is an essential feature of the Programme. Each module has a dedicated module site where key information about the module and a range of materials and interactive elements to support learning and assessment, is available.
  • Electronic Tutorial Support – Students are able to contact their module tutor or module supervisor by email whenever they wish. Tutors will endeavour to respond to student queries within 3-5 days but often sooner. Tutorial support includes face-to-face tutorial support meetings and the opportunity for students to engage with online tutorial support. Individual tutorials can also be offered using a range of technologies such as Skype and Facetime.  This is an important feature of the Programme as it enables students who may not live in close proximity to the University to access tutorial support remotely.

The programme strives to maintain a diverse assessment palette and rigorous, consistent assessment practices which aims to enable students to demonstrate their skills, knowledge and understanding in a variety of ways.

Handbooks

All modules have a handbook that complies with University and Faculty Guidelines. All handbooks are available to students on the dedicated module space on Moodle (The University's VLE).

The module handbook includes:       

  • Module aims and learning outcomes;       
  • Outline content;       
  • Assessment method;       
  • Procedures for submission of work;        
  • Recommended reading;
  • Appropriate grading criteria;
  • Links to relevant documentation and University Policy eg. The Diversity and Equality Policy, The Disability, Gender and Race Equality Scheme, guidance on regulations governing the assessment of students.

Marking

All assessed work is graded according to a percentage scale 0-100 using the University's grading criteria linked to the appropriate QAA requirements All marking procedures comply with the central University Assessment Policies. Feedback to students is available electronically using the Turnitin and Grademark systems. Feedback on the work is intended to identify strengths and points of development. Assignments are not pre-marked.  Students may receive formative, verbal feedback on plans or on a specified amount of work identified by the tutor.

Assessment criteria are communicated to students through Programme and Module handbooks with specific assignment guidance explaining the important features of each assignment.

During the Fieldwork Placement modules it is common for students to be offered continuation with part-time paid work. Several students have found full-time employment through the placement opportunities. 

On successful completion of the Programme, students will be able to demonstrate a secure understanding of the concepts and principles of Youth Work, including a critical appreciation of their relevance to a variety of settings and contexts. They will possess developed intellectual skills appropriate to Youth Work and critical reflection, including the evaluation and demonstration of the appropriateness of different and potentially conflicting approaches to problem solving in these areas.

Graduates in Youth Work will be in possession of a range of practical skills appropriate to Youth Work and critical reflection, including the making of critical judgements relative to the needs of young people in faith-based, the voluntary sector and local authority secular contexts.

Further, students will be able to communicate the results of their study in a variety of forms and with accuracy and coherence, as well as identifying the broader principles, issues and implications involved. An ability to audit, evaluate, interpret and enhance their own and other's skills within the context of Youth Work studies, with particular attention to the exercise of personal responsibility and involvement in decision-making processes, will also be in evidence.

Typical and potential career paths: following the acquisition of this award and professional endorsement, students will be equipped to follow a number of related career pathways, including, e.g. Youth Work in the faith based, voluntary and public sectors, employment related to Social Services provision and other community and care-based professions, NCS, schools' work, youth forums, youth arts, young women's projects, Youth Offending Teams, Young Offenders Prisons, International Camp Counsellors, and where faith-based, voluntary sector and areas of the public sector are looking to employ professional youth workers with a specialised knowledge and understanding of issues facing young people.

Diversity and equality are explicitly addressed as part of Youth Work core values. As a consequence,  students examine issues relating to gender, age, race, religion, sexuality and disability etc.

The NYA's Statement of Values and Principles includes (5.1.4) the following practice principles:

  • Promoting just and fair behaviour, and challenging discriminatory actions and attitudes on the part of young people, colleagues and others;
  • Encouraging young people to respect and value difference and diversity, particularly in the context of a multi-cultural society;
  • Drawing attention to unjust policies and practices and actively seeking to change them;
  • Promoting the participation of all young people, and particularly those who have traditionally been discriminated against, in Youth Work, in public structures and in society generally;
  • Encouraging young people and others to work together collectively on issues of common concern. 

A number of modules address questions of equality and diversity: disability, gender, race and religious identity etc. creating an arena for the sharing of good practice, mutual understanding, sharing of common Youth Work and professional values from both professional and legal perspectives.

There are no faith requirements: the Programme is for those with a commitment to Youth Work values and principles, however we welcome students of different faiths and will support their specific beliefs, vocations and interest in faith based youth work - in keeping with youth work values and ethics.   .

The Faculty of Education and Children Services actively and successfully address the University priorities regarding admissions, widening access and participation, Equal Opportunities and AP(E)L and it offers individual academic support to all its students.

Accreditation for Prior Experience and Learning (APEL) / Accreditation for Prior Learning (APL):There are restrictions on APL and APEL for JNC validated BA Youth Work Programmes. See section 24d.

The University is committed to the promotion of diversity, equality and inclusion in all its forms; through different ideas and perspectives, age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. We are, in particular, committed to widening access to higher education. Within an ethically aware and professional environment, we acknowledge our responsibilities to promote freedom of enquiry and scholarly expression.

Students successfully completing this Programme earn both an academic award  - 'BA Hons' and a professional endorsed award - 'JNC' Youth Worker. The Programme will work with other Faculties and Departments to endeavour to promote opportunities to gain additional minor qualifications (over the course of 3 years) relevant to future employment and to enhance employability. e.g. Child Protection Certificate; ASDAN Assessor; SRE, Food Hygiene; First Aid etc.

Students will be expected to read, sign and adhere to a Code of Conduct, which relates to their conduct as a student on a professional and vocational programme and to their conduct and professionalism whilst on their fieldwork placements.

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