University of Chester

Programme Specification
Manufacturing Engineering BEng (Hons) (Single Honours)
2016 - 2017

Bachelor of Engineering (Single Honours)

Manufacturing Engineering

Manufacturing Engineering (St Helens College)

University of Chester

St Helens College

St Helens College

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years

7 Years

Annual - September

NA

H700

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Science & Engineering Mechanical Engineering

Manufacturing Engineering

Intention of University of Chester Mechanical Engineering Department is to seek accreditation with the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Science and engineering

Thursday 18th February 2016

This degree programme has been designed to satisfy the accreditation requirements of the relevant professional institution which are themselves based on the Engineering Council’s UK Specification of Engineering Competences (UK-SPEC). This enables engineering degree programmes to be based around a common core of subjects. The individual engineering degree programmes differ at the level of module content, particularly during the higher levels of study, but share common aims and outcomes.

The BEng programme aims to:

  • Offer an interesting, challenging, and industrially relevant degree programme that lays the common foundations of manufacturing engineering principles across a core engineering curriculum, delivered with design as an integrating theme;
  • Develop in students the ability to evaluate evidence, solve problems, exercise sound judgement and lay the foundation for creative thinking that they will need in their careers as professional engineers;
  • Equip students with an awareness of engineering in the wider commercial, social, environmental and ethical context;
  • Provide opportunities for access and personal development that will enable students to reach their full potential in all aspects of University life;
  • Create the highly motivated and creative graduates with the ability to evaluate evidence, solve problems and exercise sound judgement that will be in demand by a wide spectrum of organisations.

The BEng programme of Manufacturing Engineering further aims to deliver a systematic understanding and coherent knowledge of the core subject areas, including tools for analysis and design of manufacturing systems.

The programme commences at level 5. Relevant attainment at level 4 is the entry requirement. This is normally satisfied by an Edexcel BTEC Higher National Certificate qualification in engineering.

FHEQ Level 5

At the end of FHEQ Level 5 students should:

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts, concepts, theories, principles and the underpinning engineering science of manufacturing engineering.(SE5029, SE5031, SE5032, SE5033)

Understand and demonstrate knowledge of how social, environmental, sustainability, legal and ethical considerations should affect engineering decisions. (SE5036)

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of manufacturing engineering materials, equipment and processes. (SE5029, SE5030, SE5033, SE5036)

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of codes of practice, industry standards and quality issues applicable to a career in manufacturing engineering. (SE5030, SE5036)

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of mathematical and statistical concepts, principles and models that is relevant to the analysis and solution of manufacturing engineering problems. (SE5029, SE5031, SE5032, SE5033)

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of commercial and economic context of engineering processes, including an awareness of management techniques, which may be used to achieve manufacturing engineering objectives. (SE5036)

Apply the principles, processes and methods of design. (SE5034)

FHEQ Level 6

At the end of FHEQ Level 6 students should:

Demonstrate a deep understanding of essential facts, concepts, theories, principles and the underpinning engineering science of manufacturing engineering. (SE6027, SE6031, SE6029, SE6036, SE6034)

Demonstrate a deep understanding of mathematical and statistical concepts, principles and models that is relevant to the analysis and solution of manufacturing engineering problems. (SE6027, SE6028)

Critically apply the principles, processes and methods of design. (SE6031, SE6034)

Demonstrate a deep understanding of how social, environmental, sustainability, legal and ethical considerations will affect engineering decisions. (SE6036)

Demonstrate deep knowledge and understanding of codes of practice, industry standards and quality issues applicable to a career in manufacturing engineering.(SE6032, SE6033, SE6034, SE6036)

Demonstrate a deep understanding of commercial and economic context of engineering processes, including an awareness of management techniques, which may be used to achieve manufacturing engineering objectives. (SE6027, SE6036, SE6034)

Demonstrate deep knowledge and understanding of the characteristics of manufacturing engineering materials, equipment and processes. (SE6032, SE6033, SE6029)

FHEQ Level 5

At the end of FHEQ Level 5 students should be able to:

Identify a manufacturing related problem and manipulate manufacturing engineering theory to produce a solution. (SE5029, SE5030, SE5033)

Apply appropriate methods, including the use of IT, to model, assess solutions. (SE5034, SE5030, SE5031, SE5032)

Accommodate technical uncertainty in design development and Manufacturing Engineering. (SE5032)

FHEQ Level 6

At the end of FHEQ Level 6 students should be able to:

Identify a manufacturing related problem and generate innovative solutions. (SE6032, SE6033, SE6027)

Apply appropriate methods, including the use of IT, to model, assess and evaluate solutions. (SE6032, SE6033, SE6031, SE6028, SE6036, SE6027)

Show initiative, innovation and intellect in problem solving. (SE6036, SE6032, SE6033, SE6034, SE6027)

Implement technical uncertainty in design development and Manufacturing Engineering for evaluation of manufacturing problems. (SE6034, SE6027)

FHEQ Level 5

At the end of FHEQ Level 5 students should be able to:

Apply appropriate computer software and computational techniques to assess manufacturing engineering problems. (SE5034, SE5031, SE5033)

Research information relating to manufacturing technologies and their management. (SE5036, SE5029, SE5030)

Perform analyses and calculations relevant to the solution of manufacturing related problems. (SE5029, SE5031, SE5032, SE5033)

Prepare engineering drawings and technical reports and give technical presentations. (SE5034)

Demonstrate extensive organisational and management skills. (SE5034)

Produce designs that meet technical and user specifications. (SE5034)

FHEQ Level 6

At the end of FHEQ Level 6 students should be able to:

Apply appropriate computer software and computational techniques to assess and evaluate solutions to manufacturing engineering problems. (SE6031)

Research and apply relevant information relating to manufacturing technologies and their management. (SE6032, SE6033, SE6027)

Perform analyses, calculations and evaluations relevant to the solution of manufacturing related problems. (SE6032, SE6033, SE6029, SE6027)

Prepare, evaluate and assess engineering drawings and technical reports and give technical presentations. (SE6031)

Demonstrate extensive, independent organisational and management skills. (SE6031, SE6036, SE6027)

Produce creative designs that meet technical and user specifications in all aspects of the product’s life cycle. (SE6031)

Exercise independent thought, and have the confidence to make value judgements based on limited information. (SE6032, SE6033, SE6029)

Plan and manage time and resources safely and effectively. (SE6027)

FHEQ Level 5

At the end of FHEQ Level 5 students should be able to:

Use ICT effectively to find and manage information. (SE5036)

Communicate information orally, visually and in writing to a professional standard. (SE5029, SE5030)

Work in collaboration with others to structure, plan and manage group activities. (SE5034, SE5029)

FHEQ Level 6

At the end of FHEQ Level 6 students should be able to:

Use and apply ICT effectively to find and manage information. (SE6031, SE6029)

Produce full documentation of the design process and demonstrate compliance with technical, commercial, quality and cost constraints. (SE6032, SE6033, SE7024, SE6027)

Work in collaboration with others to efficiently structure, plan and manage group activities. (SE6032, SE6033)

A Manufacturing Engineer is a creative person who is able to integrate knowledge based on mathematics, science, design, materials, manufacturing, business and management in order to solve problems that provide infrastructure for goods and services to our society.

With this in mind, this curriculum has been developed to provide a general manufacturing engineering education, including modern day control and automation modules to produce graduates with a strong academic background who are ready to enter a cutting edge industry.

Relevant Level 4 attainment, normally a Edexcel BTEC HNC, lays the common foundation of engineering principles covering the wider range of engineering disciplines such as mechanical, chemical and electronic and electrical engineering. 

Level 4  provides students with the fundamental knowledge which will aid them with progression through Levels 5 and 6. 

Level 5 modules enable the students more freedom in terms of independent learning and thinking such as the Computer Aided Design, Manufacture and Test module. Students, following the learning of fundamentals in Level 4, will also undertake modules which are closer to industry allowing them to implement their foundation knowledge in manufacturing engineering. This is evidenced by modules such as Industrial Engineering, Robotics for Manufacturing and Automation in Manufacturing. This development of applied technical understanding and working methodology will provide the students with a good grounding for progression on to Level 6.

At Level 6 students will build upon creative, analytical and technical aspects of their practice. The Individual project, some of which will be run in conjunction with industry professionals will allow students to establish professional links in addition to enabling the students to implement the knowledge gained in Levels 4 and 5. Furthermore, Level 6 modules such as CAD and CAM and Product Design are designed to encourage students to become motivated self-directed manufacturing designers.

 

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
SE5029 5 Advanced Materials Science and Engineering 20 Comp
SE5030 5 Manufacturing Processes and Quality 20 Comp
SE5031 5 Engineering Computation 10 Comp
SE5032 5 Mathematics and Statistics 10 Comp
SE5033 5 Robotics for Manufacturing 10 Comp
SE5034 5 Computer Aided Design, Manufacture and Test 20 Comp
SE5036 5 Industrial Engineering – Industry Based Project 20 Comp
SE5037 5 Automation in Manufacturing 10 Comp
SE6027 6 BEng Individual Manufacturing Engineering Project 30 Comp
SE6028 6 Experiments and Modelling for Engineering 10 Comp
SE6029 6 Composite Science and Technology 20 Comp
SE6031 6 Applied CAD and CAM 20 Comp
SE6032 6 Advanced Manufacturing Processes 10 Comp
SE6033 6 Advanced Manufacturing Systems 10 Comp
SE6034 6 Product Design 10 Comp
SE6036 6 Advanced Management in Manufacturing 10 Comp

Level 5: A candidate successfully completing level five will have accumulated 240 academic credit points, and will be eligible for the award of Diploma of Higher Education*.

These 240 academic credit points can be carried forward cumulatively towards the award of an honours level undergraduate degree award.

Level 6: A candidate successfully completing level six will have accumulated 360 academic credit points, and will be eligible for the award of an honours degree.

(*see the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education: The framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland—August 2008)

Relevant attainment at level 4 is the entry requirement. This is normally satisfied by an Edexcel BTEC Higher National qualification in Engineering, but may be 120 credits at level 4 from a relevant degree course.

The QAA Subject benchmark statement for Engineering (2015) defines the academic standard of graduates with an engineering degree.  Rather than reproducing the required learning outcomes from the UK-SPEC in full, the learning outcomes in this benchmarking statement are expressed for the threshold level that engineering students would be expected to attain on graduation and covers engineering degrees at the honours level (BEng) and the integrated master’s level (MEng) as defined in The framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The defined learning outcomes are those published by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC): The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (2015) and programme teams are now directed to draw upon these ‘output standards’ to establish standards for a diverse range of programmes.

A particular strength of this programme is the range of different assessment strategies that are deployed to ensure that the student has the best opportunity to demonstrate the attainment of a learning outcome. During the HNC and second year, a broad range of methods are used to reflect the student’s diverse background and to encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning. As the student progresses, problems become more open ended, and a greater emphasis is placed upon team and group working, the use of industrially relevant problems, and transferable skills including communication

Opportunities for the student to demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes are provided through the following summative assessment methods:

Written Examinations are typically of 2 hours duration. The content of these exams is previously unseen by the student, and many modules use written exams to assess knowledge and understanding, and selected subject-specific intellectual skills. Different modules will use open or closed book, multiple choice, open ended and essay type exams as appropriate to the subject matter.

Coursework Assignments are used throughout the curriculum where students are required to seek additional information so that they can develop and demonstrate their understanding of the course material. The exact form of assignment reflects the subject matter. In particular Laboratory Reports and/or Portfolios are used where the attainment of a subject specific practical skill is relevant. Technical Reports are used where the use of primary source material and some form of evaluation or analysis is required. Coursework may constitute the only or the major form of assessment in some modules (particularly design work), and can be conducted on an individual basis at the beginning of the degree programme, or increasingly as small groups as the student progresses.

Oral and Poster Presentations are often included as part of coursework assignments. These presentations allow students to develop their communication skills.

Computer Based Tests and Assessed Simulations are used in modules that involve a substantial computer-based element, and are used to demonstrate attainment of practical skills.

Peer Assessment is often used in modules that involve a substantial team-working element. Normally, students will moderate the final marks for the group project to reflect the contributions of different team member to encourage full an equal participation by each student. Students may also peer review other students' coursework to develop their critical thinking skills, but in this case, the quality of the peer review is assessed.

Demonstrations of Prototypes and Exhibitions are used to assess practical workshop skills and allow students the opportunity to demonstrate the realisation of a design project.

Class Tests are conducted during the course of the academic year to assess students' progress. The results from class tests provide a useful opportunity to give developmental feedback to students.

The Individual Project is the largest individual project and is undertaken during the third year of the degree programme. The project is assessed on via a written dissertation, an oral presentation and the student’s response to questions. It is expected to be at a professional level.

Formative Assessments do not contribute to the final marks achieved for each module, but provide an opportunity for students to monitor their own academic progress. They also provide a useful opportunity for lecturers to give feedback to the students and to monitor and improve the students learning experience. These assessments will take the form of diagnostic tests, in-class tests and on-line tests during lectures, and evaluation and discussions relating to logbooks and equipment during laboratory and workshop classes. Students will have opportunities to develop their oral and presentation skills during tutorials and workshops.

According to the QAA (2010), the creative way of approaching all engineering challenges is regarded as a “way of thinking” and hence generic across all disciplines. Therefore, engineering graduates will:

  • Be rational and pragmatic, interested in the practical steps necessary for a conceptto become reality.
  • Want to achieve sustainable solutions to problems and have strategies for beingcreative, innovative and overcoming difficulties by employing their knowledge in aflexible manner.
  • Be numerate and highly computer literate, and capable of attention to detail.
  • Be cost-and value-conscious, and aware of the social, cultural, environmental,health and safety, and wider professional responsibilities they should display.
  • Appreciate the international dimension to engineering, commerce and communication.
  • When faced with an ethical issue be able to formulate and operate within appropriate codes of conduct.
  • Be professional in their outlook, capable of team working, effective communicators and able to exercise responsibility.

Graduates of the BEng Manufacturing Engineering programme will be in demand by a broad spectrum of engineering organisations, particularly those within the automotive, aerospace and manufacturing sectors. The transferrable skills developed during this programme will mean that graduates are also able to enter careers in teaching, design, IT and the armed forces.

The University is committed to the promotion of diversity, equality and inclusion in all its forms; through different ideas and perspectives, age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. We are, in particular, committed to widening access to higher education. Within an ethically aware and professional environment, we acknowledge our responsibilities to promote freedom of enquiry and scholarly expression.

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