University of Chester

Programme Specification
Biomedical Science BSc (Hons) (Single Honours)
2015 - 2016

Bachelor of Science (Single Honours)

Biomedical Science

Biomedical Science

University of Chester

University of Chester

Chester Campus

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years

7 Years

Annual - September

B940

B900

Yes

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Medicine, Dentistry and Life Sciences Biological Sciences

Biomedical Science

Professionally accredited for registration purposes by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS); Approved by the Health & Care Professions Council (HCPC) 

Department of Biological Sciences

Wednesday 3rd December 2014

The overall aims of the Biomedical Science programme are to:

  • Facilitate a widening of access to higher education within the local community and beyond through flexibility in admissions procedures and learning and teaching styles;
  • Offer undergraduate awards promoting academic, vocational and personal development;
  • Provide a coherent and challenging learning experience for students who have an interest in Biomedical Science;
  • Offer attractive and flexible learning opportunities to full-time and part-time students;
  • Encourage a critically and theoretically informed and reflective approach to academic study and professional practice;
  • Foster a critical appreciation of the role and value of research and of a scientific approach to study;
  • Optimise the use of learning resources by providing opportunities for shared learning for students undertaking related programmes;
  • Increase self awareness and insight into both professional and ethical issues relevant to the practice of Biomedical Science.
  • Advances professional practice to benefit healthcare services and professions related to biomedical science.
  • Develops specific knowledge and competence that underpins biomedical science.

Knowledge and Understanding (KU)
1. Demonstrate extensive knowledge and a critical understanding of relevant theoretical concepts;2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of a broad range of practical issues as applied to the field of biomedical sciences;3. Synthesize and integrate knowledge and understanding from different areas of biomedical sciences;4. Apply a critically and theoretically informed perspective to relevant issues and current developments in biomedical sciences;

Thinking or Cognitive Skills (TCS)

1. Adopt a scientific and rigorous approach to academic study;2. Apply and evaluate a scientific approach to academic study;3. Analyse/evaluate/interpret data;4. Formulate and test hypotheses;5. Plan, conduct and report on a specific research project

Practical Skills (PS)

1. Observe, record accurately and account for features in the laboratory; 2. Prepare descriptive and interpretive laboratory reports; 3. Demonstrate the skills involved in the preparation of practical reports;4. Use IT and understand both descriptive and inferential statistics;

Key Skills (KS)

  • Communication
  • Application of Number
  • Information Literacy and Technology
  • Improving own learning and performance
  • Working with others
  • Problem solving



Employability skills encompass the attributes that help graduates to secure employment , enable them to respond to the changing demands of the workplace and contribute positively to their employer’s success and their own progress are essential as outcomes in programmes of study. Employability skills include; self-management, team working, business and customer awareness, problem-solving, communication and literacy, application of numeracy, application of information technology. All programme modules delivered by the Dept of Biological Sciences have identifiable employability learning outcomes. These have been developed to help student’s identify and develop skills that will equip them for their working lives.

Transferable Professional Skills (TPS)

1. Learn in familiar and unfamiliar situations;2. Communicate effectively (in writing, verbally and through presentation); 3. Apply basic numerical skills in the scientific context; 4. Use information technology competently and appropriately (e.g. use of standard word processing packages; internet; databases; spread sheets and specialist software as appropriate);5. Work as part of a team.
The skills detailed above are addressed throughout the degree programme as highlighted in the following grid.

 

Module Code

Module Title

KU

TCS

PS

KS

TPS

Level 4

           

BI4110

Essential Physiology

x

x

x

 

x

BI4111

Genetics and Evolution

x

x

x

x

 

BI4112

Cell Biology and Biochemistry

x

x

x

x

x

BI4113

Introduction to Immunology

x

 

x

x

x

BI4114

Data Handling and Project Design

x

 

x

x

x

BI4115

Introduction to Biomedical Sciences

x

x

x

x

x

             

Level 5

           

BI5110

Research Methods

x

x

x

x

x

BI5111

Biology of Disease

x

x

x

 

x

BI5112

Human Metabolism

x

x

x

x

 

BI5114

Applied Molecular Biology

x

x

x

   

BI5115

Applied Microbiology

x

x

x

x

x

BI5127

Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

x

x

x

x

x

             

Level 6

           

BI6110

Dissertation

x

x

x

x

x

BI6114

Medical Microbiology and Infection Control

x

x

 

x

 

BI6124

Clinical Medicine and Immunology

x

x

   

x

BI6125

Blood Sciences

x

x

 

x

x

BI6128

Cellular and Molecular Pathology

x

x

     

  • Be able to analyse, synthesise, evaluate, apply and reflect upon information gathered from the academic literature, professional organisations, and experiences in the work place, in order to propose solutions to problems relevant to Biomedical Sciences.
  • Critically apply information from an extensive understanding of theory and knowledge of case-studies to relevant issues and current developments in Biomedical Sciences

  • The ability to design and perform research in Biomedical Sciences. This includes selection of appropriate research questions, experimental design, practical mkethodologies and equipment as well as the use and interpretation of appropriate statistical tests, the effective use of graphical displays of data and the ability to come to well supported conclusions through reflection and discussion of results.
  • Be able to deploy academic and practical techniques for the integration of academic knowledge and understanding into effective professional practice in Biomedical Sciences with appropriate consideration of ethical issues and risk.

The ability to communicate effectively and appropriately at a graduate level with a range of audiences using oral, visual and written media.

The Biomedical Science single honours degree programme encompasses appropriate level-related characteristics. The emphasis at Level 4 is on ‘knowing about’, at Level 5 on linking complex elements of knowledge to one another, and at Level 6 on analysis, synthesis and reflection. Learning outcomes incorporate appropriate level characteristics.

In addition, the modular content and organisation of this programme are informed by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). Consequently, it is anticipated that the degree will successfully fulfill the requirements for professional accreditation. The IBMS stipulates that the degree “must include relevant basic scientific core subjects, together with a study of the Biomedical Science specialist subjects, integrated through a study of the biology of disease” (IBMS Criteria and Requirements for the Accreditation and Re-Accreditation of BSc (Hons) degrees in Biomedical Science, November 2004). 

Students follow a core programme covering essential skills and concepts in genetics; biochemistry; physiology; microbiology; immunology and data analysis. At Level 6, the modules foster the development of knowledge, understanding and skills in more specialised areas of Biomedical Science (e.g. haematology; histology, cytology, clinical chemistry; transfusion science, etc.).  Development of personal and professional skills such as independence of learning/ working, group working, flexibility, critical evaluative skills and reflective practice are delivered through the professional perspectives modules at Level 4 and 5.

Level 4

The modules at Level 4 can be seen mainly as providing a foundation for study at Levels 5 and 6 and provide a comprehensive review of major biological knowledge, concepts and skills for students with a range of backgrounds in the Biological Science.

Knowledge & Understanding 

Emphasis on knowing about, coverage of basic terminology, key ideas; on acknowledging sources; on accuracy; on the formulation of rational argument; on the development of a questioning attitude.

Transferable & Generic Skills  

Groundwork, secure in study skills and key skills appropriate to the subject. Library research and laboratory skills; computer literacy; data handling and numerical skills; the ability to articulate accurately.

Learning Style

Learning at Level 4 is predominately tutor designed and guided; scope for individual and group initiative within a controlled framework. Developing the ability to work in a scholarly team.

Level 5

At Level 5, students take modules involving greater detail and depth of study of key ideas and enhanced skills. The modules at Level 5 deal with essential topic areas, many of which are extended in Level 6 modules.  

 

Knowledge & Understanding 

Ability to relate complex elements of knowledge to one another-to seek links; to demonstrate a critical approach to data and evidence; to begin to develop a mastery of complex skills and concepts in the Honours studied. 

Transferable & Generic Skills 

Further consideration of appropriate study skills and of lateral thinking. Ability to audit own skills and understand and monitor personal development as a learner.

Learning Style

Tutor/student relationship viewed as a more collaborative partnership but design of learning still largely controlled by the tutor. Learners develop a mastery over a range of learning styles and the ability to select the appropriate style for the task in hand.

Level 6

At Level 6, students are required to display greater levels of independence and take significant responsibility for their learning.

 

 

Knowledge & Understanding 

Emphasis on analysis, synthesis and reflection.Ability to handle cognitive complexity; to evaluate; to apply knowledge and skills in new situations. Development of creative solutions/approaches  

Transferable & Generic Skills 

Full range of study skills consolidated and applied to independent enquiry. Able to articulate personal standpoint in the context of respect for the views of others.

Learning Style

Assumption of a greater responsibility for own learning, both independently and collaboratively. Autonomy.

Throughout the final year of study, students are encouraged to develop fully as independent and autonomous learners. The students' knowledge base will be significantly broadened through a range of modules covering the more specialised areas of biomedical sciences. In addition, students are required to undertake a research dissertation in Level 6, where strong emphasis is placed on the development of independent research skills and practical abilities, along with the ability of the student to present scientific data and arguments in the context of the overall body of knowledge within the discipline.  

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
BI4110 4 Essential Physiology 20 Comp
BI4111 4 Genetics and Evolution 20 Comp
BI4112 4 Cell Biology and Biochemistry 20 Comp
BI4113 4 Introductory Microbiology and Immunology 20 Comp
BI4114 4 Data Handling and Project Design 20 Comp
BI4115 4 Introduction to Biomedical Sciences 20 Comp
BI5110 5 Research Methods 20 Comp
BI5111 5 Biology of Disease 20 Comp
BI5114 5 Applied Molecular Biology 20 Comp
BI5115 5 Applied Microbiology 20 Comp
BI5127 5 Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences 20 Comp
XN5112 5 Human Metabolism 20 Comp
BI6110 6 Dissertation 40 Comp
BI6114 6 Medical Microbiology and Infection Control 20 Comp
BI6124 6 Clinical Medicine and Immunology 20 Comp
BI6125 6 Blood Sciences 20 Comp
BI6128 6 Cellular and Molecular Pathology 20 Comp

Students graduate with BSc Honours on completion of Level6 having obtained 360 credits (120 per level)
Students may obtain an exit award of Dip HE on completion of Level5 having obtained 240 credits (120 per level).
Students may obtain an exit award of Cert HE on completion of Level4 having obtained 120 credits.

The Biomedical Science programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science.

All modules are compulsory and the modular content and organisation of this programme are informed by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). The IBMS stipulates that the degree “must include relevant basic scientific core subjects, together with a study of the Biomedical Science specialist subjects, integrated through a study of the biology of disease” (IBMS Criteria and Requirements for the Accreditation and Re-Accreditation of BSc (Hons) degrees in Biomedical Science, November 2004).

This programme contains no work-based learning element. In place of this and in accordance to requirements of the IBMS, the students are required to undertake module BI5127 (Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences) at level 5.

Entry Requirements:

UCAS points: 280 UCAS points from GCE A Levels, including a grade C in one of the subjects recommended by the department. Typical offer - BCC/BBC
GCE A LEVEL:

The department requires one of the following subjects as essential for entry:

GCE A Level: Biology, Human Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Science
GCE Applied A Level: Applied Science

BTEC:

BTEC Extended Diploma (Applied Science): DMM

BTEC Diploma (Applied Science): D*D*

Irish/Scottish Highers: B in 4 subjects, including Biology, Chemistry or Human Biology
International Baccalaureate: 26 points including 5 in Biology or Chemistry
Access Access to Science course to include 15 level 3 credits at Distinction and 15 level 3 credits at Merit

 

OCR:

 

OCR National Extended/Diploma: merit profile plus one of the GCE A level subjects listed above

Extra Information:

 

 Please note that we accept a maximum of 20 UCAS points from GCE AS Levels and that the Welsh Baccalaureate (core) and A Level General Studies will be recognised in our offer. We will also consider a combination of A Levels and BTECs/OCRs.

All successful applicants for this Programme should be vaccinated against the hepatitis B virus. This is essential under Health and Safety Regulations for those who come into contact with blood and/or blood products. Whilst students may still enrol on this programme if they choose not to be vaccinated, their learning experiences and choice of work placement may be limited in this case.

The subject benchmark statements in Biomedical Science have been used as an important reference point in the construction of this programme’s learning outcomes, knowledge, skills and content together with the methods of learning, teaching and assessment.

All the benchmarks detailed in the Biomedical Science Subject Benchmark Statement (The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education 2007) are listed and the relevant module(s) indicated where each benchmark is addressed. All biomedical science undergraduates take the modules indicated in Section 24b (above), and consequently each student has the opportunity to “acquire knowledge in the subject areas indicated below” (The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education 2007).

 Benchmarking and Biomedical Sciences 

Core Knowledge Module(s) addressing Subject Benchmark

Human anatomy and physiology is the study of the structure, function and control of the human body, its component parts and major systems.

BI4110 – Essential Physiology

BI4111 – Genetics and Evolution

BI4113 – Introductory Microbiology and Immunology

Biochemistry is the study of chemical processes which support life. It includes the structure, functions and metabolism, including its control, of carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and proteins.

BI4112 – Cell Biology and Biochemistry

BI5112– Human Metabolism

BI4115 - Introduction to Biomedical Science

Molecular genetics is the study of structure, function and control of genes; techniques used in such study and the causes and consequences of alterations of genetic material.

 

BI4111 – Genetics and Evolution

BI5114 –  Applied Molecular Genetics

BI6128– Cellular & Molecular Pathology

Immunology is the study of the immune response in health and disease.

  

BI4113 - Introductory Microbiology and Immunology

BI6124 - Clinical Medicine & Immunology

Microbiology is the study of the structure, physiology, biochemistry, classification and control of micro-organisms.

     

BI4113 – Introductory Microbiology and Immunology

BI4115 - Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI5115 – Applied Microbiology

BI6114 – Medical Microbiology and Infection Control

   
Cellular pathology is the microscopic examination of cells (cytology) and tissues (histology) for indicators of disease. A BMS graduate will have a knowledge of the role of cellular pathology in the diagnosis and treatment of disease and of:

·        the preparation of tissue and cells for microscopic examination;

·        microscopy and its application;

·        the histology and ultra structure of normal and abnormal tissues and cells;

·        immunocytochemistry and histochemistry.

BI4115 - Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI5111 - Biology of Disease

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI6128 - Cellular & Molecular Pathology

Clinical biochemistry is the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of analytes to aid the diagnosis, screening and monitoring of health and disease. A BMS graduate will have knowledge of:

·        the principles of methods used in clinical biochemistry;

·        the investigation, management and consequences of function and dysfunction of organs and systems;

·        the principles of biochemical investigations used in the diagnosis, treatment and management of hereditary malignant disease;

·        therapeutic drug monitoring and investigation of substance abuse.

BI4112 – Cell Biology and Biochemistry

BI4115 - Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI5112 – Human Metabolism

BI5111 – Biology of Disease

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI6125 – Blood Sciences

 

Clinical immunology is the study of immunological diseases or disorders. A BMS graduate will have a knowledge of:

·        the principles of the measurement of effectors of the immune response;

·        the principles of organ transplantation;

·        prophylaxis and immunotherapy;

·        detection and monitoring of treatment of neoplasia

BI5111 – Biology of Disease 

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI6125 – Blood Sciences

BI6124 – Clinical Medicine & Immunology

Haematology is the study and investigation of the different elements that constitute blood in normal and diseased states. A BMS graduate will have a knowledge of:

·        the structure and function of bone marrow;

·        the role, structure and function of red and white cells;

·        the nature and diagnosis of anaemias;

·        haemoglobinopathies and thalassaemias;

·        haematological malignancy;

·        haemostasis and thrombosis.

BI4115 - Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI5111 - Biology of disease

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

 

BI6125 – Blood Sciences

Immunohaematology and transfusion science. Immunohaematology is the identification of blood group antigens and antibodies. Transfusion science ensures a safe supply of blood and blood components. A BMS graduate will have knowledge of:

·        the genetics, inheritance, structure and role of red cell antigens;

·        the preparation, storage and use of blood components;

·        the selection of appropriate blood components for transfusion and possible adverse effects;

·        immune mediated destruction of blood cells;

·        the role of histocompatibility antigens in transplantation.

BI4115 – Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI4113 – Introduction to Microbiology and Imunology

BI5111 – Biology of Disease 

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI6124 – Clinical Medicine and Immunology

BI6125 – Blood Sciences

Medical microbiology is the study of pathogenic micro-organisms. A BMS graduate will have knowledge of:

·        classification, structure and function of bacteria, fungi, helminths, parasites and viruses;

·        the role of ‘normal flora’;

·        the epidemiology of infectious diseases;

·        food, water and environmental microbiology;

·        anti-microbial and anti-viral therapy;

·        vaccination and immunisation;

·        the laboratory investigation of infectious disease.

 

BI4113 – Introduction to Microbiology and Imunology

BI4115 - Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI5127 - Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI5111 – Biology of Disease 

BI5115 – Applied Microbiology

BI6114 – Medical Microbiology and Infection Control

Integrated Studies  Module(s) addressing Subject Benchmark

Biology of Disease is the integrated study of a range of human disorders and disease processes together with their investigation. The effects of treatment must also be considered.

BI5111 – Biology of Disease

BI6124 – Clinical Medicine and Immunology

BI6125 - Blood Sciences

Subject and Other Skills Module(s) addressing Subject Benchmark

There is a range of skills which a BMS graduate will have acquired during the programme of study:

·        key/transferable skills (communication, IT, numeracy, data analysis);

·        research skills;

·        skills associated with biomedical laboratory practice.

A BMS graduate will be aware of the need for compliance with health and safety policies, good laboratory practice, risk and COSHH assessments and the importance of quality control and quality assurance.

BI4115 – Introduction to Biomedical Science

BI4114 – Quantitative Principles and Analytic Techniques

BI5110 – Research Methods

BI5127 – Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences

BI6110 – Dissertation  

Members of the Department of Biological Sciences have many years of experience in offering distinctive programmes of study at diploma, undergraduate, postgraduate and post-doctoral experience levels. The Department has considerable experience of supporting the learning needs of mature students and of students generally with ‘non-standard entry’ qualifications. Considerable experience has been achieved with students with limited entry qualifications both in terms of academic performance and personal development. Consequently, students encounter a broad range of teaching and learning experiences across all levels of study as befits the subject matter. Methods of teaching and learning are indicated clearly in each module descriptor and the list that follows describes the variety of approaches used by tutors.

Lectures

These feature in most modules as an effective way of imparting important content, themes and pointers for further study. However, they are supplemented by a variety of other methods of teaching and learning as described below.

Practical classes

The majority of modules at Levels 4 and 5 include practical classes. These provide the opportunity for students to develop their data handling and analytical skills as well as their practical skills (e.g. handling equipment, develping new scientific techniques). An important aspect of practical work is also the opportunity it offers for group work, encouraging working with others. At level 6, the amount of practical work is limited but students undertaking the dissertation module (BI6110) normally carry out a practical project involving a relevant empirical study.

Seminars

Seminars are used most often in Level 6 modules in which group sizes are relatively small and students tend to be more confident. Selected topics of the module content are chosen to provide the opportunity for more in-depth study and dissemination of ideas. Amongst other key skills, students are able to practise oral communication skills in a relatively informal context.

When students have specific queries that have not been addressed during formal teaching sessions, they can contact module tutors directly. In practice, these discussions tend to focus on assessment issues, including feedback on formative essays, the initial drafts of assignments, and performance in examinations. A system is in operation whereby students can make appointments to consult tutors.

Experiential Learning

See Section 24a (above) 

Intranet-based support materials

The University has an intranet (SharePoint Portal) available to all students on or off campus. This offers access to a wide range of facilities including Learning Resources, the Library and all modular support materials. Staff are increasingly using Sharepoint for making additional support materials available to students. The Department has recently invested in the on-line Encyclopaedia of Life Sciences, which is an excellent additional resource for undergraduates. 

Directed reading

As reading is central to the process of knowledge acquisition in higher education, module tutors provide reading lists to guide their students to appropriate material. Increasingly, these lists include references to the Internet and electronic sources, as well as more traditional book and journal references.

Group work

There are transferable skills that needs to be demonstrated in higher education.  Throughout the programme, working with others has been incorporated with progression incorporated from one level to the next. In many modules, particularly in practical work in the laboratory, students are encouraged to work in groups and to share ideas.

Employability Skills

Employability skills encompass the attributes that help graduates to secure employment , enable them to respond to the changing demands of the workplace and contribute positively to their employer’s success and their own progress are essential as outcomes in programmes of study.  Employability skills include; self-management, team working, business and customer awareness, problem-solving, communication and literacy, application of numeracy, application of information technology. All programme modules delivered by the Department of Biological Sciences have identifiable employability learning outcomes.

 

The University's level related criteria are a key reference when designing modular assessments. Transferable and employability skills are useful for guidance on level-related assessment. Therefore, progression towards more complex and involved assessments, that require greater levels of study autonomy and greater levels of critical analysis, underpins the overall assessment strategy of the programme. Regular and structured formative assessment is a feature of the programme ensuring that students have regular and informed feedback on their learning.

 

Course Work and Examinations

It is departmental policy to use a variety of assessment processes so that our students can demonstrate their abilities in a variety of assessment modes. Generally, staff choose 50% course work and 50% examination except for those modules where this would be inapplicable (e.g. BI4115 Introduction to Biomedical Science; BI6110 Dissertation). 

We feel that in preparing course work, which can include essays, laboratory and field exercises, case studies and presentations, students are given time and scope to present their work in a variety of modes particularly where an examination would be inappropriate. However, we are aware that examinations have an important role in summative assessment and give academic credibility (both externally and internally) to our degree programmes. 

A summary of the assessment components involved in each module and percentage weighting is presented below:

 

Code Title Essay    Lab or field report Poster Presentation Other (e.g. critical review, project report, biological diagrams) Exam or class test
BI4110 Essential Physiology    √      
BI4111 Genetics and Evolution          √
BI4112 Cell Biology and Biochemistry         √ 
BI4113 Introduction to Microbiology and Immunology          √
BI4114 Data Handling and Project Design        
BI4115 Introduction to Biomedical Sciences        
BI5110 Research Methods        √
BI5111 Biology of Disease        
BI5112 Human Metabolism         √ 
BI5114 Applied Molecular Biology          √
BI5115 Applied Microbiology          √
BI5127 Applied Clinical Skills for Biomedical Sciences        
BI6110 Dissertation          
BI6114 Medical Microbiology and Infection Control        
BI6124 Clinical Medicine and Immunology        
BI6125 Blood Sciences          
BI6128 Cellular and Molecular Pathology          

 

  

The Biomedical Science programme is designed to equip graduates with the practical (transferable) skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to embark on a career as a Biomedical Scientist or Health Care Scientist, either in industry or within the health sector. It is appreciated, however, that some graduates may ultimately decide not to embark on such a career pathway. The transferable skills embedded throughout the programme equip graduates to enter other areas of employment or to continue their studies for a postgraduate qualification.

Graduates of the BSc Biomedical Science should have:

  • knowledge and understanding of the application of science and research methods to the practice of biomedical science.
  • ability to apply academic knowledge and techniques to practical solutions in biomedical science.
  • skills of academic enquiry to generate potential solutions to problems relevant to biomedical science, and cognitive skills to critically evaluate these to arrive at solutions fitted to context.
  • an understanding of the limits of their knowledge, and how this influences analysis and interpretations.
  • skills to effectively communicate information, arguments, and analysis, in written and oral form, to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
  • confidence and transferable skills to undertake further training, develop existing skills, and acquire new competencies that will enable them to assume responsibility within biomedical science organisations.

Graduates from the programme should be able to:

(i) adopt a systematic and rigorous approach to academic study

(ii) demonstrate extensive knowledge and a critical understanding of relevant theories and concepts

(iii) integrate and synthesise knowledge and understanding in the biosciences

(iv) be able to use a range of practical (e.g. observation, recording of findings, data interpretation, etc.,) and work-related skills

(v) apply a critically and theoretically informed perspective to relevant issues and current developments (as appropriate) in biosciences

(vi) apply and evaluate a scientific approach to academic study;

(vii) demonstrate the competence and skills necessary to progress from tutor-led to student-led learning

(viii) adopt appropriate problem-solving, communication and presentation skills and ICT and numeracy

(ix) plan and implement an appropriate project and critically reflect on their practice.

The programmes of study in the Dept of Biological Sciences fully embrace the University’s commitment to the active promotion of equality of opportunity.  The  University seeks to ensure that no student is disadvantaged or discriminated against on the grounds of: gender; age; marital or parental status; sexual orientation; racial group (race, colour, nationality, ethnicity or national origins); creed (religious, political or personal beliefs or principles); membership or non-membership of a trade union; and socio-economic background. It also aims to ensure that disabled people and those with special needs do not suffer unfair discrimination, and that they are enabled to achieve their full potential as students.  The ultimate objective of the programmes delivered are to ensure all aspects of delivery are open to all sections of society and in whose activities all students can participate to the best of their ability. This programme is designed to ensure inclusivity and to ensure that the diverse needs of our students are provided for.  At a departmental level all programmes are developed and delivered with the following aspects in mind:

  • Admission requirements are clearly set out in promotional materials and due consideration is given to a policy of widening access, participation, diversity and equality. 

  • Each module and programme is developed in line with University policy to both promote equality and diversity and encourage all students in the development of their learning.

  • There is flexibility in materials and delivery of teaching to support students with disability or from culturally diverse backgrounds and the Department works closely with Learning Support in delivering this support through Learning Support Plans.

  • The induction week activities are designed to integrate all students both academically and socially and to make academic staff aware of any issues.  Students are made aware of avenues of support if they a have any issues regarding diversity and equality.

  • Supportive formative exercises are presented in modules in the first year to give all students an equal chance of succeeding.

  • Assessments are designed to afford equal opportunity to all students to display their knowledge and skills. The introduction of anonymous marking and the blue sticker scheme also enhance equal opportunity to all students.

  • In order to ensure that the needs of all students are met any barriers to access (physical, environmental and curriculum) are identified and removed or reasonable adjustments will be made based on requirements.

  • All learning materials and teaching and learning sessions are designed to be free from racist, sexist and other discriminatory assumptions and practices.

  • All lecturers are aware of diversity issues and discharge their PAT roles with knowledge and sympathy and all students are made aware of the Department structures to discuss issues should a concern arise. 

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