University of Chester

Programme Specification
History & Heritage BA (Hons) (Single Honours)
2017 - 2018

Bachelor of Arts (Single Honours)

History & Heritage

History & Heritage UCM

University of Chester

University College Isle of Man

University College Isle of Man

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years (full-time); 6 years (part-time)

7 Years

Annual - September

N/A

N/A

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Arts and Humanities History and Archaeology

History

N/A

History & Archaeology

Monday 18th May 2015

  1. To develop knowledge and understanding of a variety of different historical periods and of the historical development of more than one country.
  2. To encourage critical reflection upon the nature of history as a discipline and to develop a variety of historical skills.
  3. To enable critical engagement with different aspects of heritage, both locally and globally.
  4. To develop a critical understanding of the key issues and current debates in heritage studies.
  5. To develop a range of skills relating to contemporary heritage practice.
  6. To develop a range of transferable and key skills.
  7. To provide a coherent programme of study which will prepare students for employment or further study.

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to describe and evaluate the development of history as a discipline and of the modern heritage industry (HI4116 & HI4050).
  • Will be able to identify and evaluate the fundamental principles and concepts in the study of history and heritage (HI4116, HI4050)
  • Will be able to effectively draw upon information from a prescribed range of primary and secondary sources (all Level 4 modules).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to identify and explain key issues, including those which have some level of complexity, relating to the study of history and heritage (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100, HI5050, HI5051).
  • Will be able to identify, find, and use effectively, a small range of source materials to supplement those which have been prescribed by the module leader (all Level 5 modules).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to identify and explain in detail complex issues which are at the forefront of the study of history and heritage (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050 and HI6051).
  • Will be able to identify, find, and use effectively, a wide range of source materials to supplement those which have been prescribed by the module leader (all Level 6 modules).

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to relate references to secondary source materials with their own ideas in their work (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to collate and evaluate information and ideas to form a well-reasoned argument (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to interpret aspects of history and heritage within a prescribed context (all Level 4 modules).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to integrate secondary source material effectively in their own work (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051).
  • Will be able to identify, collate, critically analyse, interpret, and justify the relevance of appropriate source information (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051).
  • Will be able to produce a well-reasoned argument supported by relevant evidence (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to integrate primary and secondary source materials effectively with their own ideas in their work (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to identify, collate, critically evaluate, and justify links between different types of source material (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to devise and sustain a coherent argument supported by relevant evidence (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to make sophisticated judgements, using critical analysis and evaluation, in relation to a particular argument (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to convey information clearly, using accurate English expression (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to adhere to word-count restrictions for assignments (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to reference sources in a consistent manner in line with the guidance provided (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to identify different approaches to the study of history (HI4116).
  • Will be able to identify and explain conflicting arguments within the study history and heritage (all modules, particularly HI4116 and HI4050).
  • Will be able to use limited methods of historical enquiry (all Level 4 modules, particularly HI4116)
  • Will be able to identify and explain some of the key practices in the heritage industry (HI4050).
  • Will be able to identify basic legal and ethical issues within the heritage industry (HI4050).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to convey complex information clearly and accurately, using appropriate English expression, grammar, and vocabulary (all Level 5 modules).
  • Will be able to reference accurately a range of different types of sources, in line with the guidance provided (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051).
  • Will be able to identify, explain, and use appropriately, relevant methods of historical enquiry (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051).
  • Will be able to understand and explore conflicting assertions and arguments, weighing and adjudicating between alternative positions (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100 and HI5051).
  • Will be able to describe, understand and carry out some of the relevant practices in the heritage industry (WB5101).
  • Will be able to identify the potential influence of legal and ethical issues within the heritage industry (HI5050, HI5051, WB5101, and WB5004).
  • Will be able to analyse and solve straightforward problems by identifying, explaining and selecting appropriate approaches (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051, WB5101, and WB5004).
  • Will be able to set goals and milestones within a given plan and implement a strategy to achieve several objectives (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051, WB5101, and WB5004).
  • Will be able to operate effectively within employment contexts that require the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making (WB5101 and WB5004).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to convey, clearly and accurately, complex information and arguments, using appropriate English expression, grammar, and vocabulary (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to structure written work clearly and appropriately such that a clearly defined and sustained argument can be discerned (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to identify, critique, and justify the appropriate use of relevant methods of historical enquiry (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to critique conflicting assertions and arguments, and present a coherently reasoned, evidence-based evaluation (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, and ability to evaluate various working practices within the heritage industry (HI6051).
  • Will be able to analyse and evaluate the potential influence of ethical and legal issues within the heritage industry (HI6051).
  • Will be able to identify, analyse, and solve straightforward and complex problems by selecting, justifying, and using appropriate approaches (all Level 6 modules).
  • Will be able to create, implement, monitor, and evaluate a plan to achieve a limited number of agreed objectives (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to communicate information and ideas clearly, in a structured manner, both orally and in writing (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT in the presentation of information (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in communication (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to work with others, meeting specified objectives and their own responsibilities (all Level 4 modules, particularly HI4116 and HI4102).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to communicate information and ideas clearly, orally and in writing, in a structured manner that demonstrates the development of an argument through to a rational conclusion (all Level 5 modules).
  • Will be able to use a range of forms of IT for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5051).
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT to enhance the communication of information (all Level 5 modules).
  • Will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in communication and identify their implications and relevance for personal development (HI5051, WB5101, WB5004).
  • Will be able to work with others, meeting specified objectives and their own responsibilities, using appropriate techniques for working with others (WB5101, WB5004).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to communicate more complex information and ideas clearly, both orally and in writing, in a coherently structured manner that demonstrates the development of a sustained argument through to a rational conclusion (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to identify and use a range of IT resources for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6050).
  • Will be able to identify and use a range of IT resources to enhance the communication of information (all Level 6 modules).
  • Will be able to identify collective objectives and personal responsibilities within a group situation, and use and evaluate strategies to meet them (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6051).

The programme, as a whole, offers a phased progression from the broad to the particular, the general to the specialist, in line with §.5 (Progression) of Quality Assurance Agency's (hereafter, QAA) History Subject Benchmark Statement (hereafter, HSBS), 2014.

Through a range of modules, students will learn about the process and methods of historical research and the ways in which the past has been interpreted and re-interpreted over time. The primary focus of the programme is on history, with one compulsory heritage module at each Level. Heritage modules explore the development and role of the heritage industry in representing the past, and the ways in which heritage is managed, understood, and used by governments, heritage agencies and communities. HSBS §4.6 advocates a diversity of specialism within the study of history, including the introduction of concepts and methodologies of other, relevant disciplines. Although there is currently no Subject Benchmark Statement for Heritage, this emerging discipline provides an ideal companion to history. 

In addition to the heritage modules, a number of other coherent themes run through the optional modules, from Level 4 to Level 6. The themes allow students to follow a distinct pathway through the programme, taking related modules at each level, where student numbers permit. The themes reflect the interests and expertise of the Island-based lecturing staff.

Ancient History

  • HI4004 Greeks, Etruscans, Romans & Celts: Introduction to European Classical Archaeology
  • HI5053 Ancient Greece – A Collision of Cultures
  • HI6056 Ancient Rome – Aspects of Empire

Social History

  • HI4055 The Roots of State Welfare 1830-1946
  • HI4102 The Making of Modern Ireland, 1603-1923
  • HI5110 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977
  • HI5056 Crime and Poverty: controlling the 19th and early 20th century city
  • HI6057 Land, Poverty and Conflict: The Scottish Highlands, 1790-1799
  • HI6058 The New Scandinavia

Folk Culture

  • HI4054 Introduction to Folklore
  • HI5054 Oral History
  • HI5113 The Supernatural in the Early Modern World
  • HI6052 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man

Celtic and Manx Studies

  • HI4051 Introduction to the Isle of Man
  • HI4052 The Celts in History and Heritage
  • HI5054 Oral History
  • MS5202 A History of the Isle of Man: AD979 to the Present
  • HI6052 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man

British History

  • HI4053 Britain 1945-1990: Attlee to Thatcher - From Consensus to Conflict
  • HI4055 The Roots of State Welfare 1830-1946
  • HI4102 The Making of Modern Ireland, 1603-1923
  • HI5056 Crime and Poverty: controlling the 19th and early 20th century city
  • HI6052 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland and the Isle of
    Man
  • HI6057 Land, Poverty and Conflict: The Scottish Highlands, 1790-1925
  • HI6103 The English Revolution: Causes, Courses and Consequences
  • HI6109 Historical Sources: The English Revolution

European History

  • HI4052 The Celts in History and Heritage
  • HI4114 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000
  • HI4117 The Crusades, 1095-1204
  • HI4118 Martyrs, Missionaries and Mystics: The Age of Reformations c.1450 – 1650
  • HI5055 Key Thinkers of the Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment
  • HI5101 Europe in the Age of Revolutions, 1789-1861
  • HI5113 The Supernatural in the Early Modern World
  • HI6054 Serfs, Soldiers and Revolutionaries: The People of the Russian Revolution
    1917-1921
  • HI6055 Critical Reflections on the French Revolution, 1774-1799
  • HI6058 The New Scandinavia
  • HI6059 The Risorgimento and the Unification of Italy: The Rise of Liberalism and Nationalism in Italy, 1815 – 1871

A broad range of skills will be developed through the programme which will equip students for a wide variety of future employment. Close working relationships with the University of Chester, Manx National Heritage, and other heritage agencies in the Isle of Man, provide extensive opportunities for work-based learning in a variety of areas. In particular, placement modules at Level 5 will give students the chance to undertake five weeks of work placement experience, or to develop and carry out an independent research project while working with historical archives. One optional module at each level explores different aspects of the history and heritage of the Isle of Man, moving from the general (Level 4) to the specific (Level 6).

The learning and teaching strategy is informed by, and conforms to, HSBS §.6.1-6.10. The diversity of the programme syllabus is informed by HSBS §.4.1-4.7, and the plurality of its assessment practices by HSBS §.6.12-6.17 & 8.1-8.3. The assessment criteria conforms to HSBS, §.7.1-7.3 and also to the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, October 2014 §.4 (Qualification Descriptors). Overall, the programme fosters in students the historians' skills and qualities of mind as set out in HSBS §.3.

LEVEL 4

Students will study three core modules at Level 4: HI4114 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000 (20 credits) introduces students to various themes and turning points in European and world history during the last millennium. This conforms to HSBS § 4.2-4.6 which recommend the study of continuity and change over an extended span of time, region, society and culture. HI4116 Constructing History (20 credits) is designed to encourage and embed a range of key transferable and subject-specific skills and methodologies as set out in HSBS §. 3.1-3.2. HI4050 Understanding Heritage (20 credits) introduces students to the main concepts and practices in the heritage industry. Although there is no Subject Benchmark Statment for Heritage, the introduction of heritage modules is in line with HSBS § 4.6. Students also choose two optional modules at Level 4, from a selection of three, covering a range of time periods and geographical locations, in line with HSBS § 4.2-4.6.

Level 4 Core Modules

  • HI4050 Understanding Heritage (20 credits)
  • HI4114 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000 (20 credits)
  • HI4116 Constructing History (40 credits)

Level 4 Optional Modules 

Students choose two optional modules. Three optional modules will be offered each year, chosen from:

  • HI4004 Greeks, Etruscans, Romans & Celts: Introduction to European Classical Archaeology (20 credits)
  • HI4051 Introduction to the Isle of Man (20 credits)
  • HI4052 The Celts in History and Heritage (20 credits)
  • HI4053 Britain 1945-1990: Attlee to Thatcher - From Consensus to Conflict (20 credits)
  • HI4054 Introduction to Folklore (20 credits)
  • HI4055 The Roots of State Welfare 1830 - 1946 (20 credits)
  • HI4102 The Making of Modern Ireland 1603-1923 (20 credits)
  • HI4117 The Crusades, 1095-1204 (20 credits)
  • HI4118 Martyrs, Missionaries and Mystics: The Age of Reformations c.1450-1650 (20 credits)

LEVEL 5

Level 5 reinforces and extends the skills and knowledge acquired at Level 4 with modules more focussed in terms of theme, time period and region. The programme structure at Level 5 also reflects the recommendation of HSBS, §.3.1-3.3 and 4.2-4.6, including in particular an increasing opportunity for the students to specialise. Specifically, Level 5 aims to develop students as independent learners through the core modules, HI5100 Debates in History (40 credits) and the three experiential learning modules: HI5051 Researching History & Heritage (20 credits), WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning (20 credits), and WB5004 Learning in the Wider World (20 credits).  These modules encourage students to take ownership of their learning experience through their choice of topic or placement, and through the planning, organisation, research and delivery of their work. Students have the option of choosing HI5051, WB5101, or WB5004. In WB5101, students select and secure a suitable five-week work placement, through a process of self-assessment and organisational research. Throughout the placement, students are encouraged to reflect on their approach and performance, and to devise strategies for improvement, meeting criteria outlined in HSBS §.6.8. Similarly, in WB5004 students secure a placement overseas, allowing them to experience working or studying in a different cultural, linguistic, and/or social environment. 

A third compulsory module, HI5050 The Role of Heritage (20 credits), introduces students to some of the key issues in heritage studies today, through in-depth case studies from around the world. Students also choose two further optional modules, each worth 20 credits, covering a variety of historical themes, locations, and time-periods.

Level 5 Core Modules

  • HI5050 The Role of Heritage (20 credits)
  • HI5100 Debates in History (40 credits)

Level 5 Optional Modules 

Students choose one module from:

  • HI5051 Researching History and Heritage (20 credits)
  • WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning (20 credits)
  • WB5004 Learning in the Wider World (20 credits)

Additionally, students choose two further optional modules. Three optional modules will be offered each year, chosen from:

  • HI5053 Ancient Greece - A Collision of Cultures (20 credits)
  • HI5054 Oral History (20 credits)
  • HI5055 Key Thinkers of the Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment  (20 credits)
  • HI5056 Crime and Poverty: controlling the 19th  and early 20th century city (20 credits)
  • HI5101 Europe in the Age of Revolutions (20 credits)
  • HI5110 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977 (20 credits)
  • HI5113 The Supernatural in the Early Modern World (20 credits)
  • MS5202 A History of the Isle of Man: AD979 to the Present (20 credits)

LEVEL 6

At this level, students have the opportunity to develop various transferable and subject-specific skills of method and practice in the study of history and heritage, thereby meeting the recommendations of HSBS, §.4.2-4.4 & 4.6.

Single Honours History & Heritage students take the core module HI6050 History & Heritage Dissertation (40 credits). This further extends and develops their competence as autonomous learners, requiring students to engage in a sustained period of independent research and engagement with source material, and to demonstrate a mature understanding of the relevant historiography through the production of an extended piece of written work. This module meets, in particular, HSBS §.4.7. 

Students also take the core module HI6051 Heritage in Practice (20 credits) which explores the practical aspects of heritage management. This module will be part-taught through a series of guest lectures by staff of Manx National Heritage, the Isle of Man’s statutory heritage agency, and will cover issues such as site and collections management, curation, and managing audiences and visitors. 

Students also choose two optional modules, each worth 20 credits, representing a broad spectrum of historical themes, and covering a variety of geographical locations and time periods, in alignment with HSBS §.4.2-4.6. Students will engage actively with a range of source materials in these optional modules, allowing them a more challenging learning experience leading to a greater depth of learning.

Because optional module HI6109 Historical Sources: The English Revolution (20 credits) builds upon knowledge acquired in optional module HI6103 The English Revolution: Causes, Course and Consequences (20 credits), HI6109 cannot be taken independently from HI6103. However, HI6103 can be taken without HI6109.

Level 6 Core Modules

  • HI6050 History & Heritage Dissertation (40 credits)
  • HI6051 Heritage in Practice (20 credits)

Level 6 Optional Modules

Students choose three optional modules. Four optional modules will be offered each year, chosen from:

  • HI6052 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man (20 credits)
  • HI6053 Language, Nationalism, and Identity (20 credits)
  • HI6054 Serfs, Soldiers and Revolutionaries: The People of the Russian Revolution 1917-1921 (20 credits)
  • HI6055 Critical Reflections on the French Revolution, 1774-1799 (20 credits)
  • HI6056 Ancient Rome - Aspects of Empire (20 credits)
  • HI6057 Land, Poverty and Conflict: The Scottish Highlands, 1790-1925 (20 credits)
  • HI6058 The New Scandinavia (20 credits)
  • HI6059 The Risorgimento and the Unification of Italy: The Rise of Liberalism and Nationalism in Italy, 1815 – 1871
  • HI6103 The English Revolution: Causes, Course and Consequences (20 credits)
  • HI6109 Historical Sources: The English Revolution (20 credits) [Note: This module can only be taken in conjunction with HI6103]


PART-TIME STUDY

Part-time students will follow the following programme structure:

Level 4: Year 1 Core Modules

  • HI4114 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000 (20 credits)
  • HI4116 Constructing History (40 credits)

Level 4: Year 2 Core Modules

  • HI4050 Understanding Heritage (20 credits)

Level 4: Year 2 Optional Modules

Students choose two optional modules. Three optional modules will be offered each year, chosen from:

  • HI4004 Greeks, Etruscans, Romans & Celts: Introduction to European Classical Archaeology (20 credits)
  • HI4051 Introduction to the Isle of Man (20 credits)
  • HI4052 The Celts in History and Heritage (20 credits)
  • HI4053 Britain 1945-1990: Attlee to Thatcher - From Consensus to Conflict (20 credits)
  • HI4054 Introduction to Folklore (20 credits)
  • HI4055 The Roots of State Welfare 1830 - 1946 (20 credits)
  • HI4102 The Making of Modern Ireland 1603-1923 (20 credits)
  • HI4117 The Crusades, 1095-1204 (20 credits)

Level 5: Year 1 Core Modules

  • HI5050 The Role of Heritage (20 credits)
  • HI5100 Debates in History (40 credits)

Level 5: Year 2 Optional Modules 

Students choose one module from:

  • HI5051 Researching History and Heritage (20 credits)
  • WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning (20 credits)
  • WB5004 Learning in the Wider World (20 credits)

Additionally, students choose two further optional modules. Three optional modules will be offered each year, chosen from:

  • HI5053 Ancient Greece - A Collision of Cultures (20 credits)
  • HI5054 Oral History (20 credits)
  • HI5055 Key Thinkers of the Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment  (20 credits)
  • HI5056 Crime and Poverty: controlling the 19th  and early 20th century city (20 credits)
  • HI5101 Europe in the Age of Revolutions: 1789-1861 (20 credits)
  • HI5110 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977 (20 credits)
  • HI5113 The Supernatural in the Early Modern World (20 credits)
  • MS5202 A History of the Isle of Man: AD979 to the Present (20 credits)

Level 6: Year 1 Optional Modules 

Students choose three optional modules. Four optional modules will be offered each year, chosen from:

  • HI6052 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man (20 credits)
  • HI6053 Language, Nationalism, and Identity (20 credits)
  • HI6054 Serfs, Soldiers and Revolutionaries: The People of the Russian Revolution 1917-1921 (20 credits)
  • HI6055 Critical Reflections on the French Revolution, 1774-1799 (20 credits)
  • HI6056 Ancient Rome - Aspects of Empire (20 credits)
  • HI6057 Land, Poverty and Conflict: The Scottish Highlands, 1790-1925 (20 credits)
  • HI6058 The New Scandinavia (20 credits)
  • HI6059 The Risorgimento and the Unification of Italy: The Rise of Liberalism and Nationalism in Italy, 1815 – 1871
  • HI6103 The English Revolution: Causes, Course and Consequences (20 credits)
  • HI6109 Historical Sources: The English Revolution (20 credits) [Note: This module can only be taken in conjunction with HI6103]

Level 6: Year 2 Core Modules

  • HI6050 History & Heritage Dissertation (40 credits)
  • HI6051 Heritage in Practice (20 credits)


STUDY IN CHESTER

Students who begin their degree in History & Heritage at UCM will have the opportunity of transferring to the History BA (Single Honours) in Chester for Level 5 and/or Level 6, subject to satisfactory progression. Students may also choose to arrange their work-placement (WB5105) with a Chester-based organisation.

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
HI4004 4 Greeks, Etruscans, Romans & Celts: Introduction to European Classical Archaeology 20 Optional
HI4050 4 Understanding Heritage 20 Comp
HI4051 4 Introduction to the Isle of Man 20 Optional
HI4052 4 The Celts in History and Heritage 20 Optional
HI4053 4 Britain 1945-1990: Attlee to Thatcher - From Consensus to Conflict 20 Optional
HI4054 4 Introduction to Folklore 20 Optional
HI4055 4 The Roots of State Welfare 1830 - 1946 20 Optional
HI4102 4 The Making of Modern Ireland, 1603-1923 20 Optional
HI4114 4 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000 20 Comp
HI4116 4 Constructing History 40 Comp
HI4117 4 The Crusades, 1095-1204 20 Optional
HI4118 4 Martyrs, Missionaries and Mystics: The Age of Reformations c.1450 – 1650 20 Optional
HI5050 5 The Role of Heritage 20 Comp
HI5051 5 Researching History and Heritage 20 Optional
HI5053 5 Ancient Greece – A Collision of Cultures 20 Optional
HI5054 5 Oral History 20 Optional
HI5055 5 Key Thinkers of the Eighteenth-Century Enlightenment 20 Optional
HI5056 5 Crime and Poverty: controlling the 19th and early 20th century city 20 Optional
HI5100 5 Debates in History 40 Comp
HI5101 5 Europe in the Age of Revolutions, 1789-1861 20 Optional
HI5110 5 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977 20 Optional
HI5113 5 The Supernatural in the Early Modern World 20 Optional
MS5202 5 A History of the Isle of Man: AD979 to Present 20 Optional
WB5004 5 Learning in the Wider World 20 Optional
WB5101 5 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning 20 Optional
HI6050 6 History & Heritage Dissertation 40 Comp
HI6051 6 Heritage in Practice 20 Comp
HI6052 6 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland and the Isle of Man 20 Optional
HI6053 6 Language, Nationalism, and Identity 20 Optional
HI6054 6 Serfs, Soldiers and Revolutionaries: The People of the Russian Revolution 1917-1921 20 Optional
HI6055 6 Critical Reflections on the French Revolution, 1774-1799 20 Optional
HI6056 6 Ancient Rome - Aspects of Empire 20 Optional
HI6057 6 Land, Poverty and Conflict: The Scottish Highlands, 1790-1925 20 Optional
HI6058 6 The New Scandinavia 20 Optional
HI6059 6 The Risorgimento and the Unification of Italy: The Rise of Liberalism and Nationalism in Italy, 1815 – 1871 20 Optional
HI6103 6 The English Revolution: Causes, Course and Consequences 20 Optional
HI6109 6 Historical Sources: The English Revolution 20 Optional

  • 120 credits at Level 4 entitles the student to a Certificate of Higher Education
  • 240 credits at Level 5 entitles the student to a Diploma of Higher Education
  • 360 credits at Level 6 entitles the student to a Bachelor’s degree

N/A

N/A

96 UCAS points or equivalent. Mature applicants (over 21) will be considered on the basis of their previous academic achievements, work experience, or professional qualifications. 

The design of this programme has been informed by the HSBS 2014, which comprises six substantive sections to guide the design, structure, content, delivery and assessment of History undergraduate degree programmes: Section 3 (The Historian's Skills and Qualities of Mind), Section 4 (Criteria for Content and Approach in Designing a Programme of Undergraduate Study), Section 5 (Progression), Section 6 (Teaching, Learning and Assessment), Section 7 (Assessment Criteria), and Section 8 (Learning Outcomes and Achievement). These recommendations are summarised in Section 9. The text in §.24a, §.26 & §.28 of this programme specification identifies how the programme of study conforms to the HSBS 2014, both generally and specifically, and is summarised below.

The Historian's Skills and Qualities of Mind
The programme has been designed to foster the skills and qualities of mind listed in §.3-1-3.3, through a variety of teaching, learning and assessment methods (see §.28 of this programme specification). The programme structure provides students with a broad base of knowledge at Level 4, which becomes more focused and specialised at Levels 5 and 6.

Generic transferable skills (HSBS §.3.3) are embedded into the programme at every level, with students developing their independence and intellectual maturity as the programme progresses.

The additional skills referred to in HSBS §.3.2 are incorporated through the study of material culture (particularly in the heritage modules, but also in modules such as HI6052) and of language issues (HI6053). The use of databases, digital resources, and archives are embedded throughout the programme. Field trips are an important part of the programme and allow for students to become more actively engaged with the areas studied.

Criteria for Content and Approach in Designing a Programme of Undergraduate Study
The programme is designed to provide students with the opportunity to study a variety of types of history and heritage (HSBS §.4.6) and the history and heritage of more than one society or culture (HSBS §.4.3) over an extended period of historical time (HSBS §.4.2). This is demonstrated in §.24 of this programme specification which details the range of modules on offer. The analysis of source material is an integral part of the programme’s teaching and learning strategy and is formatively and summatively assessed (HSBS §.4.4; see §.28 of this programme specification).

Progression
Students progress through the programme having gained the appropriate range and depth of knowledge and experience at each Level (HSBS §.5.1). Formative and summative assessment at each Level ensures that students acquire the required skills and knowledge to progress to the next Level.

Teaching and Learning
Students are provided with comprehensive module and programme documentation at the beginning of each academic year, through module and programme handbooks (HSBS §.6.1). The teaching and learning environment comprises a variety of settings, including lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, field trips, and private study. Student participation is encouraged by tutors and is formatively and summatively assessed (HSBS §.6.2-3). Student participation is particularly encouraged in seminars and workshops which encourage group discussion and debate (HSBS §.6.5). Students receive diagnostic feedback both formatively and summatively, in every module (HSBS §.6.10 and §.7.2). At Level 5, students must take WB5101, WB5004 (in both of which they undertake a five-week work placement) or HI5051, in which they undertake an independent research project that may be based in an archival setting (HSBS §.6.8).

Assessment
Students undertake a wide variety of assessments (HSBS §.6.12), including essays (HSBS §.6.13), source analyses (HSBS §.6.14), formal examinations (HSBS §.6.13), and oral presentations and discussions (HSBS §.6.16). A number of assessments include the use of various forms of information technology, such as the inclusion of visual and other media in presentations (HSBS §.6.4 and §.6.7). Written assignments vary from short 1,000-word seminar logs to longer essays. Independent research projects allow students to formulate and execute a piece of self-directed, supervised research, such as in module HI5051, and the 8,000-word dissertation in HI6050 (HSBS §.6.15 and §.6.17). Such projects allow students to address historical enquiries and problems in depth (HSBS §.6.15).

Learning Outcomes and Achievement
The programme’s aims and learning outcomes are listed in §.22 and §.23 of this programme specification. The programme aligns with those learning outcomes and achievements detailed in HSBS §.8.1.

Throughout the programme, students will develop a range of generic and subject-specific skills. Through the study of a variety of historical events, both local and global, across a range of time periods, students will build up an awareness of continuity and change over time and of the complex histories of different societies and cultures. Students will accrue a substantial body of historical knowledge during their course of study.

Specific modules will explore the development of history as a discipline and the development and role of different historical methodologies and theories. Specific modules and assessments provide the opportunity for students to address historical problems in depth (e.g. HI5100) and to develop, research, and present research projects of their own choosing (e.g. HI5051 and HI6050).

Students will develop transferrable skills, such as oral and written communication, independent thinking, and group working throughout the programme, through participation in seminars, workshops and tutorials, and through formative and summative assessment. Students will also develop analytical skills, such as the ability to read, analyse and reflect critically on primary and secondary source material, and on the complex nature of historical interpretation. Formative and summative assessments will develop their ability to formulate appropriate questions and build and sustain arguments. Such skills are developed throughout the programme in all modules.

Recommendations for Single Honours History Students
HSBS 2014 §.9.2 outlines a number of recommendations for students of single BA (Hons) in history. These are addressed below, with reference to the BA (Hons) History & Heritage.

  • Follow a programme which gives them practical experience of the intellectual benefits occurring from studying the subject over an extended period of historical time.

The modules offered in this programme cover a time period ranging from prehistory to the late twentieth-century (see examples in the point below). The core Level 4 module, HI4114 Turning Points in History: Europe and the Wider World, 1000-2000, provides students with a broad overview of world events over the last 1,000 years. The optional module MS5202 A History of the Isle of Man: AD979 to the Present also covers a broad time period. 
 

  • Study the history of more than one society or culture.

Core and optional modules will ensure that students study a wide range of historical periods over a broad geographical area. The optional modules to be offered at Levels 5 and 6 will depend on the optional modules offered at Level 4, and will facilitate the selection of a wide range of subject areas, preventing students from studying only a narrow range of time periods and cultures, while allowing for some continuity of themes which allow students to study a particular area in depth throughout the course of their degree. For example: 

Level 4 Optional Modules (students choose two)

HI4051 Introduction to the Isle of Man
HI4004 Greeks, Etruscans, Romans & Celts: An Introduction to Classical Archaeology
HI4102 The Making of Modern Ireland, 1603-1923

Level 5 Optional Modules (students choose two)

MS5202 A History of the Isle of Man: AD 979 to the Present
HI5101 Europe in the Age of Revolutions
HI5110 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977

Level 6 Optional Modules (students choose three)

HI6052 Reconstructing Identity: The Celtic Revival in Britain, Ireland, and the Isle of Man
HI6054 Serfs, Soldiers, and Revolutionaries: The People of the Russian Revolution, 1917-1921
HI6056 Ancient Rome - Aspects of Empire
HI6103 The English Revolution: Causes, Course and Consequences

  • Carry out intensive critical work on source materials generated by the period under study.

Students will engage with primary sources at each level of the degree programme. Critical analysis of primary source materials forms an important component of assessment in most modules, and is explicitly assessed through analyses and projects which are based on primary sources, e.g. in HI5051 Researching History & Heritage. 

  • Be expected to reflect critically on the nature of their subject.

Students are encouraged to reflect critically on the study of history throughout the degree programme, in lectures and seminars, and through assignments. In particular, the core Level 4 module, HI4116 Constructing History encourages students to think critically about the development of history as a discipline and the different varieties of history. Most assessments involve an element of critical reflection. Assessment for the optional Level 5 module HI5051 Researching History & Heritage includes a 2,000-word personal commentary on their experiences as history & heritage researchers. 

  • Be introduced to some of the many varieties of history.

Core Level 4 module, HI4116 Constructing History explores the origins of history as an academic discipline and its development over time. It includes discussion of a variety of forms of historical enquiry, including those with a focus on gender, race, and history from below. Optional modules will address some of these varieties of history either explicitly or implicitly, e.g. HI5054 Oral History; HI5110 Seeking the Promised Land: Black America, 1865-1977; HI4055 The Roots of State Welfare 1830-1946.

  • Be involved in lecture or lecture-type arrangements which capture their interest and excite their curiosity.

Students will study through lectures, seminars, and site-visits, as well as individual tutorials. As class sizes will be small, students will have ample opportunity to contribute to discussions in lectures, seminars and during site-visits.

  • Engage in seminars and forms of group work.

Seminars form an important component of the History & Heritage degree.  Students will be encouraged to contribute to group discussions and to present on work that they will have prepared for the session. Group work will take place within some seminars through specific formative and summative assignments. A number of modules are part-assessed through group presentations, including the core Level 4 module HI4116 Constructing History. 

  • Undertake a wide range of assignments.

Core module assignments include essays, individual and group oral presentations, blog contributions, portfolios, book reviews, examinations, reports, projects, and an 8,000-10,000-word dissertation. Additional assignment types can be found in optional modules, such as source analyses and seminar presentations. 

  • Be assessed in a significant part on their essay-writing skills.

Essays are the most prevalent form of assessment in both core and optional modules. Essays form 50% of the mark for most core modules.

  • Be assessed on their understanding of and ability to handle contemporary source material.

Learning outcomes for most modules refer explicitly to the ability to handle contemporary source material.  This ability is assessed in most module assignments, either implicitly (e.g. through essays) or more explicitly (e.g. through primary source analyses or through research projects which are based on primary sources). 

  • Be assessed on their ability to address historical enquiries and problems in depth.

Most modules contain an element of assessment which reviews students' ability to address historical problems and enquiries. In particular, the core Level 5 module HI5100 Debates in History, explicitly explores a particular historical theme and historians' interpretations of issues relating to that theme. Assessment for this module includes a 5,000-word historiographical essay. In optional Level 6 module, HI6055 Critical Reflections on the French Revolution, students engage with contemporary and current debates about the nature of the French Revolution and critically evaluate its historiography.

Learning and Teaching
In line with the University of Chester’s Learning and Teaching Strategy 2013-2016/7, the programme is designed to support a challenging, but supportive, learning environment for students. Students are encouraged to contribute their own knowledge and experiences during small group teaching sessions, seminars, and field trips, in line with the University’s commitment to ‘students and staff working together in partnership, as active participants’.

Appropriate technology will be used to enhance module delivery and the use of technology in assessment will allow students to develop valuable transferrable skills. Students will actively engage with discipline-related research throughout the programme. UCM’s links with professional practice (including the Island’s heritage agencies and historical records repositories) enable students to tap into the extensive available expertise through guest lectures, site visits, and project-based assessments. Work-based learning plays an important role in a number of modules, particularly WB5101, WB5004, HI5051, and HI6051.

Acknowledging HSBS §. 6.2-6.6 & 9.2, the programme uses a wide range of learning and teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, field trips and private study.  Specifically: 

  • Lectures stimulate interest and provide a frame of reference for further study.
  • Seminars facilitate discussion and debate on key ideas and research issues within the discipline.
  • Tutorials provide opportunities for more personalised direction and hands-on experience and practical skills.
  • Field trips provide opportunities for first-hand experience of historical sites and fieldwork.
  • Private study encourages students to take control of their learning experience and to learn those skills which are particularly related to independent learning, such as time management, locating information, note-taking, critical reading, critical thinking, and written communication.

Assessment
The programme incorporates a broad and varied assessment regime which is recognised as central to the student learning experience (HSBS §. 6.11-6.16).

Students at all levels undertake a series of written tasks, including document analyses, book reviews, reports, essays of varying lengths, projects, a dissertation of 8,000 words, and 1-hour examinations (HSBS §. 6.13-15, 6.17, 9.3).

Oral communication is recognised as a key transferrable skill and a valuable method of formative and summative assessment (HSBS §. 6.16). Oral assessment, both formative and summative, is now undertaken at all Levels and can take the form of an individual or group presentation of a topic or a reflective dialogue in which the students reflect critically upon their own research. 

Group work (HSBS §. 6.17, 9.3), is also assessed in a number of modules, both formatively (through workshops, seminars, and tutorials) and summatively (through oral and written presentations).

Work-related assessment is an integral feature of several modules, particularly WB5101, WB5004, HI5051, and HI6051 (HSBS §. 6.7-8).

Formative assessment is embedded at each level, particularly through workshops, seminars, and individual tutorials.

All assessment is targeted to the learning outcomes of each module and to the programme overall, with assessment feedback specifically addressing these learning outcomes.

Transferable skills are embedded throughout the programme. Students will complete the programme possessing effective skills in written and spoken communication, and the interpretation of texts. Graduates will be self-critical and reflective with a high level of skill in problem-solving, project management, IT and multimedia skills (including word-processing), collaborative learning and working to deadlines. The optional modules WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work-Based Learning and WB5004 Learning in the Wider World prepare students to undertake a five-week placement and support them throughout the placement period. Optional module HI5051 Researching History and Heritage and core module HI6050 History & Heritage Dissertation help students to develop skills relating to independent working, including project development and management.

With the knowledge, skills and experience acquired through the programme, graduates will be well qualified to enter a wide range of employment sectors, including education, law, media, marketing, finance, business, tourism, and heritage.

UCM has a flexible admissions policy, and encourages applications from mature students and from groups historically under-represented in Higher Education. The general policy is to look for a good level of literacy, together with proven interest and/or expertise in an appropriate subject.

UCM has considerable experience in successfully addressing the practical and learning needs of a wide range of students. These include mature students, those entering education with a non-standard academic background, and those with a wide range of disabilities and specific needs. UCM’s Academic Support Service and Student Services provide additional support to students where necessary.

Through the nature and content of the subjects studied, the programme addresses questions of race, gender, disability and age throughout its syllabus and at all levels of study. The assessment regime is designed to evaluate a broad range of student skills and competencies.

Students studying on the programme will benefit from both the operational and academic experience of staff in history and heritage and related disciplines. Students will benefit from a number of key visits to heritage sites and organisations. UCM has very strong links with Manx National Heritage (MNH), the Isle of Man’s statutory heritage agency, and students will benefit from guest lectures from MNH staff and from local experts on various aspects of Manx history and heritage.

UCM fully endorses and adheres to the established Personal Academic Tutorial scheme. All students are allocated a personal tutor and are required to attend regular meetings throughout their studies. Personal tutors will assist with both academic and non-academic matters. In addition, and where necessary, students will be directed to the Academic Support Centre or Student Services for advice and guidance.

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