University of Chester

Programme Specification
History BA (Hons) (Single Honours)
2017 - 2018

Bachelor of Arts (Single Honours)

History

History University Centre Shrewsbury

University of Chester

University Centre Shrewsbury

University Centre Shrewsbury

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years (full-time); 6 years (part-time)

7 Years

Annual - September

V100

V100

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Arts and Humanities History and Archaeology

History

N/A

History & Archaeology

Wednesday 28th January 2015

  1. To offer students a varied but coherent experience of the subject, including opportunities to acquire knowledge and deeper understanding of several different historical periods but also to specialise in one.
  2. To enable students to engage with the development of a specific country.
  3. To encourage students to reflect critically upon the nature of the discipline and to apply themselves to a variety of historical skills.
  4. To facilitate the development of a range of transferable and key skills.
  5. To contribute to strategies to fulfil the University's mission, including the promotion of excellence in scholarship, widening access, collaboration with employers (where appropriate) and the rigorous quality assurance policies (the programme is a programme of the University and thus aspires to embrace, represent and foster the institution’s mission and values; this is particularly so given that the essential mission of the University is to educate and train students to allow their development as individuals and to serve their communities). 
  6. To enhance postgraduate opportunities in employment and research.

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will have knowledge of aspects of British history during the first and second millennia (HI4201)
  • Will be able to describe and explain the fundamental principles and concepts of the study of history (HI4112, HI4203)
  • Will be able to effectively draw upon information from a prescribed range of primary and secondary sources (all Level 4 modules).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to identify and explain key issues, including those which have some level of complexity, relating to the study of history (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100, HI5207)
  • Will be able to identify, find, and use effectively, a small range of source materials to supplement those which have been prescribed by the module leader (all Level 5 modules).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to identify and explain in detail complex issues which are at the forefront of the study of history (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100)
  • Will be able to identify, find, and use effectively, a wide range of source materials to supplement those which have been prescribed by the module leader (all Level 6 modules).

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to relate references to secondary source materials with their own ideas in their work (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to collate information and ideas to form a well-reasoned argument (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to interpret aspects of history and heritage within a prescribed context (all Level 4 modules).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to integrate secondary source material effectively in their own work (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to identify, collate, critically analyse, interpret, and justify the relevance of appropriate source information (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to produce a well-reasoned argument supported by relevant evidence (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to integrate primary and secondary source materials effectively with their own ideas in their work (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to identify, collate, critically evaluate, and justify links between different types of source material (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to devise and sustain a coherent argument supported by relevant evidence (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to make sophisticated judgements, using critical analysis and evaluation, in relation to a particular argument (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to convey information clearly, using accurate English expression (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to adhere to word-count restrictions for assignments (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to reference sources in a consistent manner in line with the guidance provided (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to identify different approaches to the study of history (HI4112, HI4203).
  • Will be able to identify and explain conflicting arguments within the study history (all modules, particularly HI4112 and HI4203).
  • Will be able to use limited methods of historical enquiry (all Level 4 modules, particularly HI4203).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to convey complex information clearly and accurately, using appropriate English expression, grammar, and vocabulary (all Level 5 modules).
  • Will be able to reference accurately a range of different types of sources, in line with the guidance provided (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to identify, explain, and use appropriately, relevant methods of historical enquiry (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to understand and explore conflicting assertions and arguments, weighing and adjudicating between alternative positions (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5100 and HI5207).
  • Will be able to analyse and solve straightforward problems by identifying, explaining and selecting appropriate approaches (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to set goals and milestones within a given plan and implement a strategy to achieve several objectives (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to operate effectively within employment contexts that require the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making (HI5207).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to convey, clearly and accurately, complex information and arguments, using appropriate English expression, grammar, and vocabulary (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to structure written work clearly and appropriately such that a clearly defined and sustained argument can be discerned (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to identify, critique, and justify the appropriate use of relevant methods of historical enquiry (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to critique conflicting assertions and arguments, and present a coherently reasoned, evidence-based evaluation (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to identify, analyse, and solve straightforward and complex problems by selecting, justifying, and using appropriate approaches (all Level 6 modules).
  • Will be able to create, implement, monitor, and evaluate a plan to achieve a limited number of agreed objectives (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).

 

Level 4

On completion of Level 4, students

  • Will be able to communicate information and ideas clearly, in a structured manner, both orally and in writing (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT in the presentation of information (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in communication (all Level 4 modules).
  • Will be able to work with others, meeting specified objectives and their own responsibilities (all Level 4 modules, particularly HI4201).

Level 5

On completion of Level 5, students

  • Will be able to communicate information and ideas clearly, orally and in writing, in a structured manner that demonstrates the development of an argument through to a rational conclusion (all Level 5 modules).
  • Will be able to use a range of forms of IT for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 5 modules, particularly HI5207).
  • Will be able to use specified forms of IT to enhance the communication of information (all Level 5 modules).
  • Will be able to reflect on their own strengths and weaknesses in communication and identify their implications and relevance for personal development (HI5207).
  • Will be able to work with others, meeting specified objectives and their own responsibilities, using appropriate techniques for working with others (HI5207).

Level 6

On completion of Level 6, students

  • Will be able to communicate more complex information and ideas clearly, both orally and in writing, in a coherently Will be able to identify and use a range of IT resources for the purpose of finding relevant sources (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to communicate in a structured manner that demonstrates the development of a sustained argument through to a rational conclusion (all Level 6 modules, particularly HI6100).
  • Will be able to identify and use a range of IT resources to enhance the communication of information (all Level 6 modules).
  • Will be able to identify collective objectives and personal responsibilities within a group situation, and use and evaluate strategies to meet them (all Level 6 modules).

 Preamble

The History Single Honours programme offers students a pyramidal structure, a phased progression from the broad to the particular, the general to the specialist, in line with § 5 (Progression) of Quality Assurance Agency's (hereafter, QAA) History Subject Benchmark Statement (hereafter, HSBS), 2014. The learning and teaching strategy, is informed by, and conforms to, HSBS, §.6.1-6.10 as it does with the diversity of its syllabus (HSBS, §.4.1-4.7), and the plurality of its assessment practices (HSBS, §.6.11-6.17 & 7.5).  The assessment criteria not only conforms to the HSBS, §. 7.1-7.5 but also to the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (hereafter, FHEQ), October 2014, §. 4 (Qualification Descriptors).  Overall, the programme fosters in students the historians' skills and qualities of mind as set out in HSBS,  §. 3.

Level 4 

History Single Honours students take three core modules: HI4201 (The Making of Britain: From Roman Province to Modern Nation), worth 40 credits, which introduces students to key historical periods of the last 2000 years and offers the opportunity to contextualise the effect of human activity on both the natural landscape and built environment of Britain, in line with HSBS, § 4.2-4.6 which recommend the study of continuity and change over an extended span of time, region, society and culture; HI4112 (The Mystery of History), worth 20 credits, designed to encourage and embed a range of key transferable and subject-specific skills and methodologies as set out in HSBS,  §. 3.1-3.2; and HI4203 (Constructing Histories), worth 20 credits, which introduces students to various conceptual questions concerning the nature of the discipline and historical method, in line with HSBS, §.4.5- 4.6 which recommends that all students reflect critically on the nature of their subject.  Students also choose two optional modules from a list of four to allow for the sampling and enjoyment of the breadth and variety of the past in their first year, which accords with HSBS, §. 4.2-4.3 & 4.6. 

Level 4 Core Modules

HI4112 The Mystery of History

HI4201 The Making of Britain: From Roman Province to Modern Nation

HI4203 Constructing Histories

Level 4 Optional Modules (choose two)

HI4204 The History of Science

HI4205 Local Studies

HI4206 Public History and Heritage

HI4207 War and Society

Level 5

Level 5 reinforces and extends the skills and knowledge acquired at Level 4 with modules more focussed in terms of theme, time and region. In particular, Level 5 aims to develop students as independent learners through its core modules, HI5100 (Debates in History), worth 40 credits, and through the experiential module during the summer term, HI5207 (Professional Practice) worth 20 credits.  Both HI5100 and HI5207 encourage students to take ownership of their learning experience through control of their choice of topic and through the planning, organisation, research and delivery of their work. Students also choose three optional modules, each worth 20 credits, representing broad chronological epochs (ancient, medieval and modern).  This structure recognises the force of the HSBS, §. 3.1-3.3 and 4.2-4.6, including in particular an increasing opportunity for the students to specialise. 

Level 5 Core Modules

HI5100 Debates in History

HI5207 Professional Practice (Experiential Learning)

Level 5 Optional Modules (choose three)

HI5203 Tudor England – Trade, Economy & Prosperity

HI5204 The English Civil War – A Nation Divided

HI5205 Total War - British Conflict Experience in the 20th Century

HI5206 Heritage Resource Management

 

Study Abroad

For those students who wish, and meet the requirements, the History Single Honours programme offers the opportunity to undertake a study year abroad at one of the University's exchange institutions through the selection of the 120-credit optional module WB5008 (The Study Abroad Experience).   

Level 6 

Single Honours students take as a core module HI6100 (Dissertation), worth 40 credits, which further extends and develops their competence as independent learners, requiring students to engage in a sustained period of independent research and engagement with source material, to foster a full understanding of the relevant historiography and to produce an extended piece of written work, thereby meeting in particular, HSBS,  §.4.7.  Students also choose four optional modules from a list of thematic/specialist subjects, each worth 20 credits, based upon a tutor's research specialism and based on primary sources closely associated with the local environment of Shrewsbury and Shropshire, thereby offering a more sophisticated, in-depth and challenging learning experience, where close familiarity with primary and secondary source material allow students to develop various transferable and subject-specific skills of historical method and practice and are thus aligned to HSBS, §.4.2-4.4 & 4.6.

Level 6 Core Module

HI6100 History Dissertation

Level 6 Optional Modules (choose four)

HI6201 Fortress Salopia – Warfare and the Landscape

HI6202 Men of Iron – Birthplace of the Industrial Revolution

HI6203 ‘England’s Finest Tudor Town’ – The Legacy of the Built Environment

HI6206 Artistic Licence – History and Heritage in the Media

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
HI4112 4 The Mystery of History 20 Comp
HI4201 4 The Making of Britain: From Roman Province to Modern Nation 40 Comp
HI4203 4 Constructing Histories 20 Comp
HI4204 4 The History of Science 20 N/A
HI4205 4 Local Studies 20 N/A
HI4206 4 Public History and Heritage 20 Optional
HI4207 4 War and Society 20 Optional
HI5100 5 Debates in History 40 Comp
HI5201 5 Roman Occupation & Settlement – Cities & the Societal Revolution 20 N/A
HI5202 5 Norman Conquest – A Statement in Stone 20 Optional
HI5203 5 Tudor England – Trade, Economy & Prosperity 20 Optional
HI5204 5 The English Civil War – A Nation Divided 20 N/A
HI5205 5 Total War – British Conflict Experience in the 20th Century 20 Optional
HI5206 5 Heritage Resource Management 20 Optional
HI5207 5 Professional Practice 20 Comp
WB5008 5 The Study Abroad Experience 120 Optional
HI6100 6 History Dissertation 40 Comp
HI6201 6 Fortress Salopia – Warfare and the Landscape 20 Optional
HI6202 6 Men of Iron – Birthplace of the Industrial Revolution 20 Optional
HI6203 6 ‘England’s Finest Tudor Town’ – The Legacy of the Built Environment 20 Optional
HI6204 6 Collecting and Collectors – The Past in Museums 20 N/A
HI6205 6 The Past in the Present – The Uses and Abuses of Heritage 20 N/A
HI6206 6 Artistic Licence – History and Heritage in the Media 20 Optional

120 credits = Certificate of Higher Education

240 credits = Diploma of Higher Education

360 credits = Bachelors Degree with Honours

N/A

N/A

UCAS points:

A minimum of 260-300 UCAS points from GCE A Levels, including a grade C in one of the subjects recommended by the department

GCE A Level:

The department recommends one of the following subjects: Ancient History, Classical Civilisation, History, Politics, Sociology

BTEC:

BTEC National Diploma/Certificate: merit profile plus one of the GCE A Level subjects listed above

Irish/Scottish Highers:

B in 4 subjects, including History

International Baccalaureate:

28 points, including 4 in History

QAA:

QAA recognised Access to HE Diploma (Humanities), Open College Units or Open University Credits

OCR:

OCR National Extended/Diploma: merit profile plus one of the GCE A levels listed above

The Advanced Diploma: acceptable in combination with one of the GCE A Level subjects listed above

 Extra Information:            

Welsh Baccalaureate (core) will be recognised in our tariff offer

The HSBS, 2014, inter alia comprises six substantive sections to guide the design, structure, content, delivery and assessment of History undergraduate degree programmes: Section 3 (The Historian's Skills and Qualities of Mind), Section 4 (Criteria for Content and Approach in Designing a Programme of Undergraduate Study), Section 5 (Progression), Section 6 (Teaching, Learning and Assessment), Section 7 (Assessment Criteria) while it concludes with Section 9 (Recommendations) which distils the benchmarks in the other sections. The text in Sections 24a, 26 & 28 of this programme specification aligns the programme of study to the HSBS, 2014, both generally and specifically.

Learning and Teaching

In line with the University of Chester’s Learning and Teaching Strategy 2013-2016/7, the programme is designed to support a challenging, but supportive, learning environment for students. Students are encouraged to contribute their own knowledge and experiences during small group teaching sessions, seminars, and field trips, in line with the University’s commitment to ‘students and staff working together in partnership, as active participants’.

 

Appropriate technology will be used to enhance module delivery and the use of technology in assessment will allow students to develop valuable transferrable skills. Students will actively engage with discipline-related research throughout the programme. The University Centre’s links with professional practice enable students to tap into the extensive available expertise through guest lectures, site visits, and project-based assessments. Work-based learning plays an important role in a number of modules, particularly HI4203 and HI5207.

Acknowledging HSBS §. 6.2-6.6 & 9.2, the programme uses a wide range of learning and teaching methods, including lectures, seminars, workshops, tutorials, field trips and private

study. Specifically:

  • Lectures stimulate interest and provide a frame of reference for further study.
  • Seminars facilitate discussion and debate on key ideas and research issues within the discipline.
  • Tutorials provide opportunities for more personalised direction and hands-on experience and practical skills.
  • Field trips provide opportunities for first-hand experience of historical sites and fieldwork.
  • Private study encourages students to take control of their learning experience and to learn those skills which are particularly related to independent learning, such as time management, locating information, note-taking, critical reading, critical thinking, and written communication.

Assessment

The programme incorporates a broad and varied assessment regime which is recognised as central to the student learning experience (HSBS §. 6.11-6.16).

 

Students at all levels undertake a series of written tasks, including document analyses, book reviews, reports, essays of varying lengths, projects, a dissertation of 7,500 words, and 1-hour examinations (HSBS §. 6.13-15, 6.17, 9.3).

 

Oral communication is recognised as a key transferrable skill and a valuable method of formative and summative assessment (HSBS §. 6.16). Oral assessment, both formative and summative, is now undertaken at all Levels and can take the form of an individual or group presentation of a topic or a reflective dialogue in which the students reflect critically upon their own research.

 

Group work (HSBS §. 6.17, 9.3), is also assessed in a number of modules, both formatively (through workshops, seminars, and tutorials) and summatively (through oral and written presentations).

 

Work-related assessment is an integral feature of several modules, particularly HI5207 (HSBS §. 6.7-8).

 

Formative assessment is embedded at each level, particularly through workshops, seminars, and individual tutorials.

 

All assessment is targeted to the learning outcomes of each module and to the programme overall, with assessment feedback specifically addressing these learning outcomes.

The successful graduate will possess effective skills in written and spoken communication, and the interpretation of texts. The graduate will be self-critical and reflective with a high level of skill in problem-solving, project management, IT and multimedia skills (including word-processing), collaborative learning and working to deadlines.

Areas of employment suitable for graduates include the civil and military services, the history and heritage industries, teaching, business, journalism, law, further historical research at higher degree level and many others for which the graduates' transferable skills make them fit for purpose.

The programme conforms to the University's policies and codes of practice on equal opportunities and diversity and widening access and participation.  By its very nature, the programme addresses questions of race, gender, disability and age throughout its syllabus and at all levels of study.  The Department is sensitive to the range of different educational needs required by students and thus coordinates its learning and teaching with Student Support & Guidance, in terms of study plans and various types of developmental advice, while its assessment regime is designed to evaluate a broad range of student skills and competencies.

All students are issued with a comprehensive Programme Handbook and a Module Handbook at the commencement of each module.  Students needing further advice are welcome to consult the Programme Leader or the Module Tutor. 

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