University of Chester

Programme Specification
Community Policing and Criminal Investigation BSc (Hons) (Single Honours)
2016 - 2017

Bachelor of Science (Single Honours)

Community Policing and Criminal Investigation

Community Policing and Criminal Investigation

University of Chester

University of Chester

University of Chester, Warrington Campus

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 Years

7 Years

Annual - September

2S11

L437

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Social Science Institute of Policing

College of Policing 

Skills @ Justice - sector skills council [www.skillsforjustice.com]

The course content is underpinned by the "Practice Advice on Core Investigative Doctrine" (ACPO NPIA 2012, 2nd Edition)

Criminology (where relevant)

Criminology http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/SBS-Criminology-14.pdf

 

College of Policing

The University of Chester is an approved provider of the College of Policing's Certificate in Knowledge of Policing (CKP) which is embedded within all Levels of the BSc Community Policing and Criminal Investigation programme.

Policing Module Assessment Board

Tuesday 1st July 2014

The educational aims of the programme are to develop the students' ability to utilise their research skills, evaluate existing bodies of knowledge, critically evaluate new information and ideas, and accept accountability for their actions and conclusions. Students will have therefore developed transferable graduate level skills in research, analysis, synthesis, problem solving, communication (oral and in writing) and the ability to work autonomously and as part of a team.

The programme will also equip students with the relevant knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour necessary to conduct impartial, fair and objective investigations, while maintaining an approach that recognises the concerns and needs of all parties involved. 

Throughout the duration of the programme the student will be taught and assessed against the College of Policing Certificate of Knowledge learning outcomes but at the appropriate level within the HE framework for the year of study.

Upon successful completion of the programme the student will also have attained our Knowledge of Policing (CKP Equivalent) certificate which is aligned with the College of Policing's (CoP) Certificate of Knowledge in Policing (CKP) curriculum.   The University of Chester is an approved provider of CoP's CKP.

At the end of the programme students will be better able to exercise appropriate judgement in a number of complex policing situations and will be able to demonstrate:

  1. Knowledge, understanding and skills appropriate to graduate employment and specifically to employment within law enforcement and related areas
  2. Knowledge and understanding of criminal law, evidence and criminal procedure
  3. Critical awareness of social, political and cultural diversity in the context of the law, ethics, the history and current developments of policing and the criminal justice system
  4. Understanding of the key concepts and theoretical approaches that have developed and are developing in relation to crime; responses to crime; policing and protecting people
  5. Knowledge understanding and skills in relation to managing and leading people
  6. The ability to undertake research and communicate the findings of research appropriately
  7. Knowledge, understanding and skills in relation to the theoretical and practical aspects of investigation; interviewing witnesses, victims and suspects
  8. Application of theory to real-world practice of related areas facilitated during role play exercises and via the work based learning module at level 5
  9. The ability to act independently, managing and critically reflecting upon the students own learning, but also be aware of team dynamics and how to be an effective team player
  10. Explain the investigative process and planning required to conduct an investigation relating to priority and volume crime
  11. Apply the investigative mind-set
  12. To plan, prepare, conduct and evaluate investigative interviews with suspects, victims and witness in accordance with legislation, national advice and best practice
  13. To critically analyse evidence and intelligence and assess its value in the investigation process balanced against criminal legislation, procedure and human rights
  14. Demonstrate how to make and record decisions during an investigation
  15. Explain how investigative and evidential evaluation can assist to determine the value of material gathered in an investigation
  16. Use core investigative strategies common to most investigations including victim and witness, suspect and scene strategies
  17. Record their decision-making process and justify their actions in criminal and civil proceedings
  18. Recognise how evidenced based research can influence effective policing strategy
  19. Understand how working with the community in multi-agency partnership and solve local community problems.

FHEQ Level 4/FHEQ Level 5/FHEQ Level 6

  • An awareness of the ethical issued involved in Policing (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the principles and practice of criminal investigation (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5640, SO5641, SO5642, SO5643, SO5644, SO5645, SO6614 - SO6619)
  • A knowledge and understanding of a substantial range of legal doctrines, major concepts and values that underpin law and the legal system (SO4626, SO4628, SO4629, SO5613 - SO5645, SO6613, SO6616)
  • A knowledge and understanding of the purpose of some areas of law from a critical perspective (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641,SO5640, SO5641, SO5642, SO5643, SO5644, SO5645, SO6613).

FHEQ Level 4/FHEQ Level 5/FHEQ Level 6

  • An ability to collect,categorise and analyse information (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • An ability to evaluate conclusions derived from the process of analysis ( SO4626 - SO6641)
  • The application of such skills as outlined above in the context of the Policing profession (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Recognise and distil issues from factual or hypothetical information, and prioritise them in terms of their relevance and importance (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Undertake an analysis of complex legal or factual information in a systematic way and according to the purpose to be served (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641. SO4642, SO5613 - SO5645, SO6613, SO6641)
  • Apply knowledge and understanding to solve problems – actual or hypothetical. Propose and handle alternative solutions (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Produce a synthesis of relevant doctrinal and policy issues in relation to a topic (SO4628, SO4641, SO5613- SO5645, SO6616) 
  • Offer critical evaluation of particular arguments and make informed judgements about their merits (SO4626 - SO6641).

FHEQ Level 4/FHEQ Level 5/FHEQ Level 6

Practical Skills

  • An ability to act with limited autonomy under direction and supervision (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641) 
  • Identify and retrieve legal information using paper and electronic sources (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641)  
  • Use primary and secondary sources relevant to the topic under study (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641) 
  • Collate information and materials from a variety of sources in a coherent way (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641) 
  • Plan and undertake tasks in areas of law, policing and criminal justice already studied (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641)
  • Plan and undertake research in areas of law, policing and criminal justice not previously studied (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641)
  • Properly attribute and utilize the work of others (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO4642, SO5613 - SO6641).

 

Professional Skills

  • An ability to understand professional policing and its relationship with the legal system and to analyse and evaluate conclusions (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • An awareness of the needs of society generally and of its most vulnerable members in particular (SO4626, SO5613)
  • Understand the importance of personal and organisational ethics (SO4626, SO5613) 
  • Understand and use proficiently the English language, both orally and written (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Present knowledge in a way which is comprehensible to others and directed to their concerns (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Understand and present relevant statistical or other numerical data as part of an argument (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Reflect on own learning, and seek and make use of feedback in order to be able to evaluate their own performance
  • Manage time effectively (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • Work in groups as a participant who contributes effectively to the group’s task (SO4626 - SO6641) 
  • Construct a consistent and sustained argument (SO4626 - SO6641).

FHEQ Level 4/FHEQ Level 5/FHEQ Level 6

  • An ability to interview and communicate the conclusions of such a process and to be able to defend their conclusions under examination within a legal and ethical context (SO4626, SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO5613 - SO6641)
  • An ability to evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses as an investigative interviewer (SO4628, SO4629)
  • An ability to work appropriately with others as members of the group and also as representatives of other agencies involved in professional decision making (SO4628, SO4629, SO4640, SO4641, SO5613 - SO6641)
  • An ability to use the concepts and methodology associated with investigative interviewing and to recognise the complexity of so doing (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • An ability to plan and conduct investigations into priority and volume crime (SO4628, SO4629, SO4641)
  • An ability to collect and collate evidence and present evidence in a court setting (SO4626, SO4628, SO4629, SO4641, SO5613 - SO6641)
  • An ability to understand the complexity of Policing and Multi-agency problem solving and communicate the conclusions of such a process and to be able to defend their conclusions under examination within a legal and ethical context (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • An ability to evaluate their own strengths and weaknesses (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • An ability to work appropriately with others as members of the group and also as representatives of other agencies involved in professional decision making (SO4626  -SO6641)
  • An ability to use the concepts and methodology and to recognise the complexity of so doing (SO4626 - SO6641)
  • An ability to record the decision-making process and rationale within a legal and ethical framework SO4626, SO4629, SO4641, SO5613 - SO6641).

The programme is designed to provide students with the academic knowledge and theory for students who wish to develop their ability to critically review their work, utilise their research skills, develop their technical expertise and exercise a degree of professional judgement in order to foster a career within the area of Law Enforcement. 

The University of Chester is an approved provider of the College of Policing's Certificate of Knowledge in Policing (CKP).  The CKP curriculum is embedded throughout the BSc Community Policing and Criminal Investigation programme; upon successful completion of Level 6 students will attain the award of BSc. (Hons) in Community Policing and Criminal Investigation and the Knowledge of Policing (CKP equivalent) Certificate.   

 

Level 4 comprises six modules:

  1. SO4626 History of Policing, Ethics, Culture and the Development of Law (20 Credits)
  2. SO4628 Investigative Interviewing (20 Credits)
  3. SO4629 Intelligence, Legal Procedure and Evidence (20 Credits)
  4. SO4640 Managing and Investigating Crime and Crime Scenes (20 Credits)
  5. SO4641 Managing Investigations in relation to Missing Persons (20 Credits)
  6. SO4642 The Effective Policing and Managing of Road Safety (20 Credits)

Summative assessment will be by examination, assignments, personal role play, simulated exercise, conducting of interviews in line with professional doctrine, reflective journal, group presentations.

Level 5 comprises six modules: four mandatory and two optional modules:

Mandatory Modules:

  1. SO5613 Community Engagement and Partnership Working (20 Credits)
  2. SO5640 What Works in the Effective Reduction and Prevention of Crime and Disorder (20 credits)
  3. SO5641 Policing Accountability Values and Ethics (20 credits)
  4. WB5101 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning (20 credits)

Optional Modules:

  1. SO5642 Understanding Financial Investigation and Fraud (20 credits)
  2. SO5643 Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation (20 credits)
  3. SO5644 Managing Critical Incidents and Major Investigations (20 credits)
  4. SO5645 Integrated Offender Management (20 credits)

Summative assessment will be by examination, assignments, personal role play, simulated exercise, personal presentation, a personal and professional development plan, reflective essay and group presentations.

Level 6 will comprise five modules, three mandatory and two optional modules.

Mandatory Modules:

  1. SO6613 Research Methods in Policing Dissertation (40 Credits)
  2. SO6614 Protection of Vulnerable Children and Adults (20 Credits)
  3. SO6616 Counter Terrorism, Transnational and Organised Crime (20 Credits)

Optional Modules:

  1. SO6612 Advanced Criminal Law, Procedure and Evidence (20 Credits)
  2. SO6615 Youth and Criminal Justice (20 Credits)
  3. SO6617 Drugs and Alcohol in Society (20 Credits)
  4. SO6618 Digital Crime - Investigation and Intelligence (20 Credits)
  5. SO6619 Strategic Management and Leadership in Policing (20 Credits)
  6. SO6640 Managing Communication and the Media within Policing (20 Credits)
  7. SO6641 Delivering Quality Services within the Criminal Justice System (20 Credits)

Summative assessment will be by assignment, examination, research proposal, presentations and dissertation.

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
SO4626 4 History of Policing, Ethics, Culture and the Development of the Law 20 Comp
SO4628 4 Investigative Interviewing 20 Comp
SO4629 4 Intelligence, Legal Procedure and Evidence 20 Comp
SO4640 4 Managing and Investigating Crime and Crime Scenes 20 Comp
SO4641 4 Managing Investigations in relation to Missing Persons 20 Comp
SO4642 4 The Effective Policing and Managing of Road Safety 20 Comp
SO5613 5 Community Engagement and Partnership Working 20 Comp
SO5640 5 What Works in Effective Reduction and Prevention of Crime and Disorder 20 Comp
SO5641 5 Policing Accountability, Values and Ethics 20 Comp
SO5642 5 Understanding Financial Investigation and Fraud 20 Optional
SO5643 5 Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation 20 Optional
SO5644 5 Managing Critical Incidents and Major Investigations 20 Optional
SO5645 5 Integrated Offender Management 20 Optional
WB5101 5 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning 20 Comp
SO6612 6 Advanced Criminal Law, Procedure and Evidence 20 Optional
SO6613 6 Research Methods in Policing Dissertation 40 Comp
SO6614 6 Protection of Vulnerable Children and Adults 20 Comp
SO6615 6 Youth and Criminal Justice 20 N/A
SO6616 6 Counter Terrorism, Transnational and Organised Crime 20 Comp
SO6617 6 Drugs, Alcohol and Society 20 Optional
SO6618 6 Digital Crime – Investigation and Intelligence 20 Optional
SO6619 6 Strategic Management and Leadership in Policing 20 Optional
SO6640 6 Managing Communication and the Media within Policing 20 N/A
SO6641 6 Delivering Quality Services within the Criminal Justice System 20 N/A

Level Four. 120 credits (60 ECTS)
Cert.HE in Community Policing and Criminal Investigation (an academic award)

Level Five. 240credits (60 ECTS)
Dip.HE in Community Policing and Criminal Investigation (academic award)

Level Six. BSc 360 Credits (60 ECTS):
BSc in Community Policing and Criminal Investigation (academic award) and Knowledge of Policing (CKP equivalent) Certificate

Minimum pass rate of 40% to be applied to all components of modules at Level 4 and Level 5 only, with derogation from Regulation F4.2 (no in-module compensation between different components permitted) and from Regulation F4.3 (no cross-module compensation permitted).

The University of Chester is an approved provider of the College of Policing's Certificate of Knowledge in Policing (CKP).  The CKP curriculum is embedded within the BSc Community Policing and Criminal Investigation programme. Upon successful completion of the BSc. Community Policing and Criminal Investigation programme, students will also attain the Knowledge of Policing (CKP Equivalent) Certificate.

280 UCAS points from GCE A Levels or equivalent. Typical offer - BCC/BBC.

 

The most relevant academic benchmarks with respect to Investigation are those of Criminology (2014), professionally the National Occupational Standards are identified by the sector skills council - Skills@Justice.

For the sector skills council they are:

CI 101 Plan and Conduct Allocated Investigations

3.1 Plan allocated investigations

3.2 Conduct allocated investigations

CJ 101  Plan, Conduct and Evaluate Interviews with Victims and Witnesses for Dedicated Investigations.      

3.1 Plan and prepare interviews with victims and witnesses                                         

3.2 Conduct interviews with victims and witnesses                                           

3.3 Evaluate interviews and carry out post-interview processes

CJ 201  Plan, Conduct Interviews with Suspects for Dedicated Investigations.                                     

4.1 Plan and prepare interviews with suspects  

4.2 Conduct Interviews with suspects

4.3 Evaluate interviews and carry out post-interview processes

For Criminology (http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Documents/SBS-Criminology-14.pdf) they are: 

Subject knowledge and understanding

Benchmark Threshold achievement Typical achievement
An understanding of the social and historical development of policing, of the changing values governing police work including human rights, of the structure and culture of police work in different locations, of policing diversity, and of new and emergent forms of private and state policing. Able to recognise different police cultures, historical and contemporary trends in police work, and the implications of changes in the values governing police work and police practice in a diverse society. Able to evaluate policing practices and developments in terms of changing values and relationships between individuals, groups, and public and private agencies in different locations.

 Cognitive abilities

Benchmark

Threshold achievement Typical achievement

Ability to draw on relevant evidence to evaluate competing explanations and evaluate the viability of competing explanations within criminology and draw logical and appropriate conclusions.

Able to describe contrasting interpretations of crime and victimisation. Able to assess a range of perspectives and discuss the strengths of each for the understanding of crime and victimisation.
An understanding of how to design research appropriately in relation to a specific problem, design and use appropriate research strategies for data collection using either quantitative or qualitative methods, apply statistical techniques and methods and distinguish between traditional and non-traditional (transgressive) research practices where appropriate. Able to gather and summarise information and able to describe quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection, and to undertake basic analysis Able to draw on materials from a range of sources and demonstrate an ability to synthesise them. Able to design and use appropriate research strategies for data collection using quantitative and qualitative methods. Able to apply basic statistical techniques where appropriate.
An understanding of how to assess the ethical issues arising in particular research situations. Able to describe quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection, and to undertake basic analysis. Able to distinguish between ethical and unethical research practice.
Ability to assess a range of perspectives and discuss the strengths of each for the understanding of crime and victimisation. Able to contrast different points of view and discuss them in a logically coherent manner. Able to evaluate the viability of competing explanations within criminology and to draw logical and appropriate conclusions.

Subject-specific skills

Benchmark

Threshold achievement Typical achievement
Ability to summarise and explain empirical information and research findings about crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance. Able to summarise the findings of empirical research on criminological issues including the ability to identify the methodological framework used. Able to summarise and explain empirical information and research findings about crime, victimisation and responses to crime and deviance; able to assess the methodology used.
Ability to access or gather appropriate qualitative or quantitative information to address criminological questions in relation to crime, victimisation, responses to crime and deviance, and representations of these, using qualitative and quantitative methods. Able to apply basic research tools appropriately and in a preliminary way. Able to apply basic research tools appropriately in relation to theoretically driven, exploratory, or evaluation research.
Ability to investigate criminological questions in relation to victimisation, crime, responses to crime and deviance, and representations of these. Able to undertake a preliminary criminological investigation of crime, victimisation, responses to crime and deviance, and representations of these using qualitative and quantitative methods. Able to gather appropriate qualitative or quantitative information to address criminological questions in relation to crime, victimisation, responses to crime and deviance, and representations of these, using qualitative and quantitative methods.
Ability to recognise the ethical implications of research into criminological questions and identify appropriate solutions. Able to recognise the ethical dimensions of research into criminological questions. Able to recognise the ethical implications of research into criminological questions and to identify appropriate solutions.

The programme utilises a variety of learning and teaching methods, which provide opportunities for students to enhance their learning skills and personal development during this programme. These teaching and learning methods also take account of equal opportunities and inclusive practice. All methods of learning and teaching are related to and relevant for the acquisition of key and subject specific knowledge and skills including the relevant elements of the College of Policing's CKP curriculum, to afford students the best opportunity to meet module and programme learning outcomes. Students are made aware of how modules will be delivered, and what is expected of them, in the student handbook and in module guides.

SEMINARS - will provide opportunities for student-centred and interactive learning. These will be organised around themes for discussion and/or designated reading with the aim of enabling students to deepen their knowledge and competence knowledge of a particular subject and develop their ability to critically examine alternative perspectives.

WORKSHOPS - these are intended to provide experience in collaborative and creative problem solving. Workshops will also aim to develop key skills in information retrieval and presentation, communication skills and team/group work skills.

TUTORIALS - will provide the opportunity for individuals or small groups of students to meet with individual staff members. The aim is to provide a context whereby students' personal development and progress can be assessed (formative feedback); students can be encouraged to develop learning skills; students can be assisted to make informed and realistic choices within their course and support can be offered for individual or group project work and dissertation supervision.

MANAGED LEARNING ACTIVITIES - these will comprise formative learning activities that are set with a specific task focus to develop students policing skills and academic skills in preparation for summative assessments (in line with the UK Quality Code Chapter B3 - ensuring students have adequate time to reflect on learning before being assessed).

PRACTICAL PROBLEM BASED ACTIVITIES - these will allow students to conduct practical activities related to a given problem/task and develop their understanding of how research evidence can inform policy, inform intelligence gathering investigation and structure decision making.

Students have access to the University's Student Support Services and Network. At the commencement of the programme students will have a tutorial with their allocated approved tutor in relation to their ability to engage with academic qualifications and study and each student will be treated on an individual basis depending upon their individual needs.


The methods of assessment are closely linked to the learning outcomes of the modules and programme. The aims of the programme are set out in section 22 and the programme outcomes in section 23 of this Programme Specification. The learning outcomes represent the skills to be acquired across the programme. In turn, as has been stated previously, these skills and outcomes have been informed by the various benchmark statements set out above.

Each module descriptor states the module specific learning outcomes that are assessed in each component of assessment, these also cite the relevant College of Policing CKP curriculum codes. The assessments will then measure the learning outcomes. These will be articulated in each in-course assessment. Thus, there is conceptual linkage between the benchmarks, programme aims and outcomes, skills, module outcomes and assessment in each module, and these linkages will be apparent in the actual assessment tasks.

In addition, the assessments are designed to provide a broad platform for students to demonstrate that they have achieved the module and programme outcomes in as diverse a set of assessments as it is possible to prescribe in a programme of broad choice. The assessments address academic learning outcomes, professional competences and the development of student experience. Ranges of both formative and summative assessment/methods are used. Each method of assessment is chosen for its fitness to purpose. Many of the methods of assessment reflect forms of recording, reporting and presentation and other work-related activities.

 Formative assessments are varied and may include:

  • Presentations
  • Reflective Log
  • Essay plans
  • Question and answer sessions
  • Knowledge checks
  • Monitored role play
  • Community based learning
  • Planning and preparation for interviewing
  • Practice Interview sessions
  • Planning and preparation for interviewing
  • Conduct and analyse interviews with victims, witnesses and suspects
  • Commentary on Interviewing techniques
  • Analysis of recorded interviews
  • Preparation of interview transcripts
  • Review case materials
  • Plan and conduct an investigation into Priority and Volume Crime
  • Be subject to self, peer and tutor review
  • Develop a "policy book"

Formative assessment forms a significant part of the learning experience and developing the student's skills and knowledge. Much of the work is evidenced in Portfolios and forms a background for the summative assessments. The formative assessment is intended to foster student development and improve their ability to acquire the skills and knowledge they will need to meet the programme objectives. Several forms of formative assessment are used in the programme.

One, for example, is embedded in "classroom" activities where tutors will ask questions and require students to undertake small tasks to assess their level of understanding and whether they have fully achieved the objectives required by the programme. If, when assessed, the student and/or their tutor feel that the student has not yet attained the required level of skill and knowledge tutors will identify weaknesses and suggest ways in which they can improve. The second example is a more formal "practice presentation" of the summative assessment and will normally take place about half way through the relevant part of the programme.

Summative assessments are also varied and include:

  • Portfolios
  • Assignments
  • Reflective Essay
  • Personal and Group Presentation
  • Examinations, both traditional and structured
  • Observed tasks
  • Professional conversation
  • Analysis of recorded interview
  • Preparation of interview transcripts
  • Review case materials
  • Plan and conduct an investigation into Priority and Volume Crime
  • Be subject to self, peer and tutor review
  • Collecting and collating evidence
  • Investigative case management exercise
  • Brief tutors on the Investigation
  • Develop a "policy book"
  • Oral tribunal with a Solicitor
  • Conduct role-play practical exercises where students' compliance with legislation and professional practice will be assessed 

Summative assessment, unlike formative assessment, provides a measure of student achievement with respect to their performance in relation to the programme's intended learning outcomes. Given the vocational nature of some of the programme, summative assessment will be modelled on professionally relevant activities such as interview planning, analysis and review, the development of policy documents and the proper recording of evidence for example.

The pedagogical basis of these assessment strategies are discussed in: Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Assessment and classroom learning, Educational Assessment: Principles, Policy and Practice, 5, pp. 7-74. Bloom, B. S., Hastings, J. T., & Madaus, G. F (Eds.) (1971). Handbook on formative and summative evaluation of student learning. New York: McGraw-Hill. Wiliam, D. & Black, P. (1996). Meaning and Consequences: a basis for distinguishing formative and summative functions of assessment? British Educational Research Journal, 22(5).

The Quality Code (QAA), 2012, The UK Quality Code for Higher Education: Part B: Assuring and enhancing academic quality, March 2014. http://www.qaa.ac.uk/assuring-standards-and-quality/the-quality-code/quality-code-part-b

Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA), 2000, Code of practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education, Section B6: Assessment of students, May 2000.

 

In general terms, holders of the BSc in Community Policing and Criminal Investigation should be able to demonstrate:

  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the principles in Policing and the way in which those principles have developed
  • Successful application in the workplace of the range of knowledge and skills learnt throughout the programme
  • Ability to apply underlying concepts and principles outside the context in which they were first studied, and the application of those principles in a work context
  • Knowledge of the main methods of enquiry in Policing and the ability to evaluate critically the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems in Policing and apply these in a work context
  • An understanding of the limits of their knowledge, and how this influences analysis and interpretations based on that knowledge in Policing.

They will be able to:

  • Use a range of established techniques to initiate and undertake critical analysis of information, and to propose solutions to problems arising from that analysis in Policing
  • Effectively communicate information, arguments and analysis, in a variety of forms, to specialist and non-specialist audiences, and deploy key techniques of Policing
  • Undertake further training, develop existing skills, and acquire new competences that will enable them to assume responsibility within the Police.

More particularly on successful completion of the programme, students will be able to demonstrate a secure understanding of the concepts and principles of Policing including the importance of their role in the community in the context of ethnic and social diversity. They will possess the intellectual skills appropriate for Police work including the ability to critically reflect on their own behaviour and on the situations in which they find themselves. 

Graduates will be in possession of a range of practical skills appropriate to Policing and with the ability to make critical judgements in complex and stressful situations.  A successful graduate of this programme will be both a competent investigative interviewer and investigator at a foundational level and will have attained the Knowledge of Policing (CKP equivalent) certificate, currently mandated by most police forces in England and Wales as the minimum recruitment criteria for the role of police officer.

As an integrated programme addressing the knowledge, competence and developing the experience of professionals, who require both investigative interviewing and investigative skills, the programme is designed to meet the professional requirements of the relevant professional bodies. Extensive discussion has taken place with the College of Policing to ensure that the Programme meets its professional need.

The University is committed to the promotion of diversity, equality and inclusion in all its forms; through different ideas and perspectives, age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. We are, in particular, committed to widening access to higher education. Within an ethically aware and professional environment, we acknowledge our responsibilities to promote freedom of enquiry and scholarly expression.

The student will self-fund the programme of study.

The University of Chester is an approved provider of the College of Policing's Certificate of Knowledge in Policing (CKP) which is embedded throughout the BSc. Community Policing and Criminal Investigation programme.  On successful completion of the programme the student will also attain the Knowledge of Policing (CKP equivalent) Certificate.  The CKP is currently mandated by many police forces in England and Wales as the minimum recruitment criteria for the role of police officer.

College of Policing Statement

Achievement of the Certificate in Knowledge of Policing (CKP) will help prepare those seeking recruitment to the Police Service as a Police Constable in England or Wales. The qualification is also relevant to other related roles within the Criminal Justice Sector.

The certificate is an important element of the Professional Entry into Policing Pre-Join Strategy, and accredits the knowledge and understanding which also forms part of the Diploma in Policing qualification. The Diploma in Policing is the minimum mandatory qualification which Regular Police Constables are required to achieve to be confirmed in rank and forms part of the Initial Police Learning and Development Programme (IPLDP). All those who achieve the Certificate in Knowledge of Policing through a provider approved by the College of Policing will be able to submit this as evidence of the knowledge component of the Diploma. All awarding organisations offering the Diploma in Policing recognise and accept the relationship between the CKP and Diploma in Policing.

Successful achievement of the Certificate in Knowledge of Policing does not in itself provide any guarantee of recruitment as a trainee Police Constable. Each police force within England and Wales sets out its own recruitment process and selection policy and entry requirements vary from force to force. Prospective students are therefore strongly advised to check the specific requirements of their chosen force prior to undertaking study.

It should be noted that all candidates need to pass medical and fitness tests as well as background and security checks and undertake a series of assessments, tests and an interview at a Police SEARCH® assessment centre.

Back - to previous page  Print - launches the print options panel