University of Chester

Programme Specification
English Literature BA (Hons) (Single Honours)
2017 - 2018

Bachelor of Arts (Single Honours)

English Literature

English Literature

University of Chester

University of Chester

Chester Campus

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years

7 Years

Annual - September

Q300

Q300

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Arts and Humanities English

Benchmark for the Subject Group ‘English’

N/A

English Module Assessment Board

Wednesday 4th December 2013

provide an interesting and stimulating programme in English Literature of honours degree standard, broadly representative of the range and variety of the discipline of English Literature as academically practised today;

offer a coherent and balanced syllabus, combining the core study of English literature from the Renaissance to the present day with a range of options and opportunities for specialisation;

give students the opportunity to explore diverse critical and theoretical perspectives upon literature and literary studies, including historical, formalist, generic, thematic, and author-based approaches;

deliver a tutor-supported student-centred programme which employs a variety of learning, teaching, and assessment methods appropriate to the study of English Literature at first degree level;

devise and embed within the delivery of the curriculum high-quality pedagogical materials and resources which support the students in their learning;

achieve best practice in learning and teaching by a process of continual internal audit and monitoring which takes due account of student feedback and peer review;

offer a programme which supports any students who struggle to achieve the required academic standards, both through the routine processes of consultation and, where necessary, through specialist support in the relevant skills;

provide a learning environment which conveys an atmosphere of support and encouragement, sensitive to and catering for the abilities and needs of all learners, and dedicated to enhancing the students’ enjoyment of literature and their confidence in the learning experience;

equip students with various skills for a wide range of careers and professions, thereby enabling them to secure gainful employment after graduation;

provide an engaging and challenging programme which will qualify students for further specialist study at postgraduate level;

offer a humane and worthwhile programme which will be of value to all students in terms of their personal growth - intellectual, cultural, spiritual, moral, psychological, and social.

By the end of this programme:


Students will have knowledge of a range of literature in English from the Renaissance to the present day and an understanding of significant authors and texts, studied in relation to their historical/cultural contexts.

Students, in studying a range of literary genres (poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fictional prose), forms, modes and conventions, will have developed an understanding of the richness and complexity of literary culture.

Students will gain knowledge of the language, technical devices, and stylistic methods of literature, with relevant literary-critical terms and tools of analysis.Students will understand a broad range of ideas and concepts pertinent to the study of literature, including various critical approaches and theoretical perspectives on literature and literary studies.

Students will know the main characteristics of various literary movements and traditions.

FHEQ Level 4: Introduction to literary periods from the Renaissance to the present day and a range of literary forms, styles, genres and critical and theoretical approaches. Beginning to acquire knowledge and understanding of specialist terminology and tools.

  • EN4001( period, form, genre, terminology, tools of analysis)
  • EN4002 (critical and theoretical approaches)

FHEQ Level 5: A more fully developed knowledge and understanding of specific literary periods, movements and traditions, and of literary-critical and theoretical approaches.

  • EN5001(literature of the Romantic period, key writers, forms, influences, ideas, context)
  • EN5002 (literature of the Victorian period, key writers, forms, influences, ideas, context)
  • EN5004 (the Gothic- genre, key writers, features, development)
  • EN5013 (theoretical approaches to literature and film)

FHEQ Level 6: A fully developed knowledge and understanding of periods, movements, traditions, genre and critical and theoretical approaches. Application to independent study.

  • EN6001 (literature of the Renaissance period, key writers, forms, influences, ideas, context)
  • EN6003 ( literature from the Modernist period until the present day, key writers, forms, influences, ideas, context)
  • EN6004 (the dissertation, specialist knowledge and understanding, terminology and tools of research and analysis)
  • EN6019 (Crime fiction – genre, key writers and features, development)



 

By the end of this programme: 

Students will have developed close reading skills and associated analytical, interpretative and evaluative skills.

Students will have developed a grasp of the ways in which meaning is produced and of the aesthetics of reception.

Students will be able to apply a range of theoretical concepts and critical tools to enhance their appreciation of literary texts.

Students will be reflective learners, critically aware of the processes of communication and analysis.

Students will be able to use secondary sources to develop and improve an understanding of primary sources.

Students will have developed scholarly and literary research skills, methods and processes.

FHEQ Level 4: Beginning to show a grasp of specialist skills, in particular close reading, negotiation of the production and reception of meaning, appreciation of critical and theoretical approaches, evaluation and application of secondary sources and research skills.

  • EN4001 (close reading, evaluating and deploying secondary sources)
  • EN4002 (appreciation of the complexities of the production and reception of meaning, and of critical and theoretical approaches)

FHEQ Level 5: A fuller understanding and more adept application of cognitive skills to examine in depth literature from specific periods and a range of forms and genres, and to conduct scholarly research.

  • EN5001 (close reading, analysis, research and application of critical and theoretical concepts to examine a range of literature of the Romantic period)
  • EN5002 (close reading, analysis, research and application of critical and theoretical concepts to examine a range of literature of the Victorian period)
  • EN5013 (study and application of a range of critical and theoretical concepts to a range of literary texts and film)
  • EN5202 (research process examined, scholarly research skills, processes and methods applied in experiential module to individual projects)

FHEQ Level 6: A mastery of cognitive skills applied to the sophisticated examination of literature from specific periods and a range of forms and genres, and to the completion of a dissertation

  • EN6001( all cognitive skills brought into play to examine literature from the Renaissance period)
  • EN6003 (all cognitive skills brought into play to examine literature from the Modernist period until the present day.
  • EN6004 (all cognitive skills applied to the completion of an independent study)

By the end of this programme:

Students will have acquired skills in reading and associated note-taking, along with skills of selection and synopsis.

Students will be able to collaborate with colleagues and will have developed their oral skills by discussing literature and language in seminars, small group work, tutorials and projects.

Students will have developed skills of debate and argument, including the rhetorical skills of the art of persuasion through the delivery of oral presentations and seminar papers.

Students will have gained writing skills, such as the composition of discursive and/or analytical essays, the writing of examination answers, and various other kinds of writing required by the range of modular coursework assessments.

Students will be able to use appropriately information and communication technologies, particularly the use of word processing software, email, the web, CD-ROM/DVD, and other audio/video materials. 

Students will gain skills of comprehension and transmission, including the ability to read, interpret, paraphrase and summarise written material lucidly and cogently.

Students will be proficient in effective written and spoken communication and presentational skills.

Students will be able to apply knowledge derived from abstract, theoretical, and ideological sources to practical situations. They will have the capacity to interrogate and critique various assertions, claims and arguments, weighing and adjudicating between alternative positions.

Students will develop skills in: problem-solving, project management, organisation and time-management, including working to deadlines. Students will also gain independent and collaborative learning skills.

Students will possess IT and multimedia skills, including word-processing skills and the skills associated with using websites, email, CD-ROM/DVD.  Students will also develop a range of life skills.

FHEQ Level 4: Beginning to acquire high level reading, writing, oral communication skills and the skilful use of information and communication technologies. Able to apply abstract and theoretical ideas. Acquiring capacity to assess information and arguments, problem solve, manage time and work both independently and collaboratively.

  • EN4001 ( close reading, analysis, essay writing, seminar discussion, collaborative oral presentations, use of VLE, assessing and deploying secondary sources)
  • EN4002 (assessing and applying abstract and theoretical ideas)

FHEQ Level 5: Showing a more adept grasp of practical and professional skills brought into play to examine period literature with a specific opportunity to hone these skills also available at this level through experiential modules.

  • EN5001 (practical and professional skills brought applied, developed and assessed through the examination of literature from the Romantic period)
  • EN5002 (practical and professional skills applied, developed and assessed through the examination of literature of the Victorian period)
  • EN5202 Professional and Academic Development: Research Methods (selection, synopsis, interpretation, application of abstract and theoretical ideas, construction of argument, researching, writing reports, using IT skills, time-management, working independently)

FHEQ Level 6: Students will demonstrate a mastery of these skills in relation to literature from specific periods and in particular in the skills required to successfully complete a dissertation.

  • EN6001 (practical and professional skills brought into play to examine in depth literature from the Renaissance period)
  • EN6003 (practical and professional skills brought into play to examine in depth literature from the Modernist period to the present day)
  • EN6004 (selection, summary, interpretation, assessment and construction of argument, application of abstract and theoretical ideas, researching, deploying IT skills, time management, working independently, writing a dissertation)
  • EN6013 (writing poetry with a view to publication)

By the end of the programme:

Students will have developed their oral skills to a high standard by discussing literature in seminars, small group work, tutorials and projects.

Students will have developed skills of debate and argument, including the rhetorical skills of the art of persuasion through the delivery of oral presentations and seminar papers.

Students will have developed their writing skills to a high standard and in a range of forms.  They will be able, for example, to write discursive and/or analytical essays, and have the ability to paraphrase and summarise written material lucidly and cogently.

Students will be able to use appropriately information and communication technologies, particularly the use of word-processing software, email, the web, CD-ROM/DVD, and other audio/video materials.

Communication skills are integral to all aspects of this programme. Since teaching is primarily conducted through seminars, and assessment constantly measures oral and written communication skills, these skills are included in the teaching and the assessment for all modules and with reference to level-specific expectations. For example:

FHEQ Level 4:

  • EN4001 ( introduction to seminar discussion, delivering oral presentations, writing discursive and analytical essays)

FHEQ Level 5

  • EN5002 (informed seminar discussion, group presentations, writing discursive and analytical essays)

FHEQ Level 6

  • EN6004 (tutorial discussion, writing reports, writing a lucid, cogently argued dissertation)

 

The programme is structured to develop students' awareness of, and responsiveness to, a wide range of styles, forms and genres in English Literature. Level 4 is foundational. All students follow EN4001 Studying Literature, a double core module which introduces the study of English at degree level, equipping students with the basic knowledge and skills needed to progress further. The literary texts studied on this module are drawn from the Renaissance to the late twentieth century. Single Honours students also take: the single core module EN4002 Approaches to Literature, which enhances EN4001 by introducing a variety of theoretical and critical approaches; and the double core module EN4003 Contemporary Literature, which builds on EN4001 by addressing literature from the late twentieth century to the present day.   Additionally, Single Honours students must take one further option module, either EN4004 Poetry, or EN4006 Fiction.  Each of these modules offers a foundational engagement with key texts belonging to a particular genre, and with the special skills required to read and understand each genre. 

At Level 5 students must take either EN5001 Romantic Literature or EN5002 Victorian Literature. EN5001 addresses the literature that emerged from the great cultural shift in Europe and America from around the 1780s and onwards. Romantic and post-Romantic concepts and preoccupations are investigated by looking at some of the key writers of the age. EN5002 addresses the literature of the Victorian period, which had its own prominent themes and issues, notably the Condition of England Question, the Woman Question, and the challenges posed to religion by contemporary scientific advances.  At Level 5, Single Honours students also have a choice of optional modules.  Students who are taking EN5001 Romantic Literature may also take the double module EN5002 Victorian Literature as one of their options; students who are taking the double module EN5002 Victorian Literature may also take EN5001 Romantic Literature as one of their options. Students opting to do both EN5001 and EN5002 will take one optional module from the following list while those opting for only one double module (either EN5001 or EN5002) will take three optional modules in English drawn from the following list: EN5004 The Gothic; EN5008 American Literature; EN5009 Tragedy; EN5013 Reading Contemporary Fiction and Film through Theory; EN5015 Ancient and Modern: Continuities and Contrasts in Medieval and Early Modern Literature; EN5016 Alternative Worlds. 

In addition, at Level 5, students have the opportunity of taking a module in 'Work-Based Learning', which may involve a work placement relevant to their desired career. Alternatively, for those students wishing not to make this choice, the English department offers experiential modules (of which students may choose one). They are: EN5201 Professional and Academic Development: Varieties of Writing, a module that will enable students to work on their critical and creative writing skills; EN5202 Professional and Academic Development: Research Methods, a module which will focus on the scholarly skills of writing and research required for the dissertation in the final year and EN5205 Chester Retold: Unspoken Stories, Put into Words, a module designed to offer students the opportunity to take storytelling out in to the community to enhance their careers and employability skills; further options are ML5210 Introduction to TESOL/TEFL, which is designed for students intending to spend a year abroad and/or considering teaching English as a foreign language during that time, and SP5230 Applied Spanish for Beginners, which will provide an intensive and immersive experience of Spanish from beginner level with a particular emphasis on the working environment.

All students of English Literature will have an opportunity to study abroad at a partner university either for a term or an academic year by opting for one of the following modules: WB5004 or WB5008.

At Level 6, single honours students must choose one of two double core modules.  These are: EN6001 Renaissance Literature, which addresses key writers of the age of Shakespeare and EN6003 Modernism and After, which engages with the complex, formally experimental literature of the early twentieth century and the postmodernist literature that followed it. In addition, all Single Honours students must take EN6004 Dissertation and two optional modules drawn from the following list: EN6006 Science Fiction; EN6010 Specific Author; EN6013 Writing Poetry for Publication; EN6021 Out of Their Minds: Representing Madness; EN6022 Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture; EN6025 The American Way; EN6027 Ireland in Literature and Film.

SINGLE HONOURS ENGLISH LITERATURE LEVEL FOUR
CORE MODULES

EN4001 Studying Literature (40)

EN4002 Approaches to Literature

EN4003 Contemporary Literature (40)

OPTIONS
Students select ONE of the following:

EN4004 Poetry

EN4006 Fiction

SINGLE HONOURS ENGLISH LITERATURE LEVEL FIVE
CORE REQUIREMENTS 
EITHER:
EN5001 Romantic Literature (40)
OR:
EN5002 Victorian Literature (40)

OPTIONS
EITHER:
Students select ONE of the following:
EN5001 Romantic Literature (40)
EN5002 Victorian Literature (40)
AND ONE option from the list following

OR

Students select THREE of the following:

EN5004 The Gothic

EN5008 American Literature

EN5009 Tragedy

EN5013 Reading Contemporary Fiction and Film through Theory

EN5015 Ancient and Modern: Continuities and Contrasts in Medieval and Early Modern Literature

EN5016 Alternative Worlds

Students who do not wish to take the Work-Based Learning module (WB5101), offered by the Centre for Work Related Studies, MAY select ONE of the following:

EN5201 Professional and Academic Development: Varieties of Writing

EN5202 Professional and Academic Development: Research Methods

EN5205 Chester Retold: Unspoken Stories, Put into Words 

ML5210 Introduction to TESOL/TEFL

SP5230 Applied Spanish for Beginners

All students of English Literature will have an opportunity to study abroad at a partner university either for a term or an academic year by opting for one of the following modules: WB5004, WB5007, or WB5008.

SINGLE HONOURS ENGLISH LITERATURE LEVEL SIX
CORE REQUIREMENTS
EN6004 Dissertation (40)
EITHER:
EN6001 Renaissance Literature (40)
OR:
EN6003 Modernism and After (40)

OPTIONS

Students select TWO of the following:

EN6006 Science Fiction

EN6010 Specific Author

EN6013 Writing Poetry for Publication

EN6021 Out of Their Minds: Representing Madness

EN6022 Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture

EN6025 The American Way

EN6027 Ireland in Literature and Film

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
EN4001 4 Studying Literature 40 Comp
EN4002 4 Approaches to Literature 20 Comp
EN4003 4 Contemporary Literature 40 Comp
EN4004 4 Poetry 20 Optional
EN4005 4 Drama 20 N/A
EN4006 4 Fiction 20 Optional
EN5001 5 Romantic Literature 40 Optional
EN5002 5 Victorian Literature 40 Optional
EN5004 5 The Gothic 20 Optional
EN5006 5 Brave New Worlds 20 N/A
EN5008 5 American Literature 20 Optional
EN5009 5 Tragedy 20 Optional
EN5012 5 Satire 20 N/A
EN5013 5 Reading Contemporary Fiction and Film through Theory 20 Optional
EN5014 5 European Literature in Translation 20 N/A
EN5015 5 Ancient and Modern: Continuities and Contrasts in Medieval and Early Modern Literature 20 Optional
EN5016 5 Alternative Worlds 20 Optional
EN5201 5 Professional and Academic Development: Varieties of Writing 20 Optional
EN5202 5 Professional and Academic Development: Research Methods 20 Optional
EN5204 5 Professional and Academic Development: Presentation Skills 20 N/A
EN5205 5 Chester Retold: Unspoken Stories, Put into Words 20 Optional
ML5210 5 Introduction to TESOL/TEFL 20 Optional
SP5230 5 Applied Spanish for Beginners 20 Optional
WB5004 5 Learning in the Wider World 20 Optional
WB5007 5 International Exchange Module – Full academic year 120 Optional
WB5008 5 The Study Abroad Experience 120 Optional
WB5101 5 Enhancing your Employability through Work Based Learning 20 Optional
EN6001 6 Renaissance Literature 40 Optional
EN6002 6 Literature 1660 - 1780 40 N/A
EN6003 6 Modernism and After 40 Optional
EN6004 6 Dissertation 40 Comp
EN6005 6 Absurdism in Modern Literature 20 N/A
EN6006 6 Science Fiction 20 Optional
EN6007 6 Literature and Addiction 20 N/A
EN6010 6 Specific Author 20 Optional
EN6012 6 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature 20 N/A
EN6013 6 Writing Poetry for Publication 20 Optional
EN6015 6 Restoration Drama 20 N/A
EN6019 6 Crime Fiction 20 N/A
EN6021 6 Out of Their Minds: Representing Madness 20 Optional
EN6022 6 Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture 20 Optional
EN6023 6 Fantasy 20 N/A
EN6024 6 Page, Stage, Screen: Literature and Adaptation 20 N/A
EN6025 6 The American Way 20 Optional
EN6026 6 The Prison 20 N/A
EN6027 6 Ireland in Literature and Film 20 Optional
EN6028 6 Studying Gender: Literature, Culture, Theory 20 N/A

  • 120 credits at Level4 lead to the award of Certificate of Higher Education
  • 240 credits including 120 at Level 5 lead to the award of Diploma of Higher Education
  • 360 credits including 120 at Level 6 lead to the award of Bachelor of Arts (Single Honours)

 

The latest entry requirements at time of completing this version of the Programme Specification (June 2016) are as follows: 

  • A minimum of 120 UCAS points from GCE A Levels, including a grade C in one of the subjects recommended by the department. 

The department recommends one of the following subjects as essential for entry:
GCE A Level: English Literature, English Language or English Language and Literature Combined

  • BTEC National Diploma/Certificate: merit profile plus one of the GCE A Level subjects listed above
  • Irish Highers/Scottish Highers: B in 4 subjects, including English
  • International Baccalaureate: 28 points, including 4 in English
  • QAA recognised Access course (which includes English at Level 3), Open College Units or Open University Credits

Please note: A BTEC National Award or the Welsh Baccalaureate (core) will be recognised in our tariff offer.

The above requirements are subject to annual review.


 

The Benchmark Statement for English states that: 'What characterises English as a subject is critical attention to the spoken and written word, to the relationship between thought and expression, and to the variety of social and cultural forms and contexts in which textual production, interpretation and communication occur.' The programme is characterised by its scope and variety, whereby students develop the necessary critical skills in modules spanning the period from the Renaissance to the present and covering a wide range of genres and forms: for example, at Level 4 on EN4001, EN4002; Level 5 on EN5001, EN5002 and EN5013; at level 6 on EN6001 and EN6003, EN6006, EN6019 and EN6021. The development of historical and contextual awareness is embedded in all modules; however, many are focused on specific historical periods or cultural movements: for example, at Level 4 on EN4001; Level 5 on EN5001, EN5002 and EN5008; and at level 6 on EN6001, EN6003, EN6005, EN6010 and EN6022.  

The Benchmark Statement also states that: 'The study of English Literature involves close reading and the interpretation and analysis of prose, poetry, drama and other types of imaginative writing in, or translated into, English from across the world [...] Students learn to identify the stylistic, formal and rhetorical properties of texts, and explain how these contribute to meaning.' All modules address the skills required for scholarly reading and writing and involve study of the literary and critical uses of language, but in the following this is a particular focus: EN4001, EN4002, EN5013, EN5201, EN5202, EN6004, and EN6013. EN5008, EN6025 and EN6027 examine writing in English from North America, Europe, Ireland, the Caribbean and South Africa. All modules on the programme address the forms, structures and rhetoric of texts and the relationships between texts, but those with a strong element of this include: EN4001, EN4002, EN5001, EN5002, EN5009, EN5012, EN5013, EN6001, EN6003, EN6021, EN6022. 

The Benchmark Statement also maintains that an English degree should 'provide an intellectually stimulating experience of learning and teaching'  This is a major consideration in the planning of all modules on the programme, where teaching methods (lectures, seminars, tutorials, workshops, theatre visits, etc.) and assessment methods (essays, projects, examinations, seminar papers, group presentations, creative writing portfolios, etc.) are both varied and challenging.   Teaching, learning and assessment methods also respond to the Benchmark Statement's expectations in terms of balance and variety, and the provision of opportunities for both 'collaborative and individual independent study'.

All of the modules on the programme are designed to develop the following knowledge and skills outlined in the English Benchmark Statement which states that graduates who have studied English should know about:

  • literature from different periods;
  • the breadth of literatures in English;
  • the role of readers in shaping texts;
  • the relationship between different genres and different media;
  • critical, theoretical, linguistic and stylistic concepts and terminology.

and that they should be able to:

  • read closely and critically;
  • analyse texts and discourses, and respond to the affective power of language, using appropriate approaches and terminology;
  • develop independent and imaginative interpretations of literary, critical, linguistic or creative material;
  • articulate an understanding of complex texts and ideas;
  • write clearly, accurately and effectively;
  • apply scholarly bibliographic skills appropriate to the subject.

 

 

 

The programme uses a wide range of learning and teaching methods, including:
seminars; small-group discussion; large-group discussion; lectures; tutorials; resource-based learning; tutor-supported independent study; workshops.

The programme uses a wide range of assessment methods, including:

essays; formal examinations; seminar papers; private study projects; dissertations; oral presentations; resource based learning reports.  These methods have been developed in accordance with the English Department Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy.   Central to the strategy is tutor-supported student-­centred learning, one of whose features is ‘to employ a broad range of appropriate learning, teaching and assessment methods, which develop the students’ potential as autonomous, active learners (for the Department recognises that its students are already experienced learners who bring to their studies diverse and valuable learning experiences)’.   Furthermore, varied assessment admirably suits the widening participation agenda: the Department of English Mission Statement maintains that one of the Department’s aims is ‘to facilitate greater access to the study of English at degree level through a flexible admissions policy, and the use of a variety of appropriate learning, teaching and assessment methods’.  Accordingly, the programme has been developed with a wide variety of assessment in mind.

The successful graduate will possess effective skills in written and spoken communication, and the interpretation of texts. The graduate will be self-critical and reflective with a high level of skill in problem-solving, project management, IT and multimedia skills (including word-processing), collaborative learning and working to deadlines. 

The programme conforms to the University Equal Opportunities Policy and the appropriate Codes of Practice. By its very nature, the Programme in English Literature actively engages with issues of race, gender, disability and age. The Department of English, which hosts the Programme is fully committed to the support of all its students whatever their circumstances. Over the years the Department has sought advice about and received training in the support of students with a variety of disabilities.

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