University of Chester

Programme Specification
Computer Science BSc (Hons) (Single Honours)
2017 - 2018

Bachelor of Science (Single Honours)

Computer Science

Computer Science (2017 onwards)

University of Chester

University of Chester, University College Isle of Man

Thornton Science Park, University College Isle of Man

Undergraduate Modular Programme

Full-time and Part-time

Classroom / Laboratory,

3 years (6 years part time)

7 Years

Annual - September

G400

I100

No

17a. Faculty

17b. Department

Science & Engineering Computer Science

Computing (2016)

Seeking Institute of Engineering and Technology accreditation

Computer Science Undergraduate Board

Wednesday 29th March 2017

  • To promote the academic, vocational and personal development of students
  • To encourage a critically and theoretically informed and reflective approach to academic study
  • To foster learning and research related to the academic, personal and vocational concerns of its students and staff
  • To facilitate access to higher education and lifelong learning through adaptive learning and teaching styles
  • To develop skills and knowledge appropriate to preparation for postgraduate study or further research, and to a range of vocations and careers, particularly in the area of Computer Science
  • To provide effective, structured learning opportunities for undergraduate study in Computer Science which promote the development of knowledge and understanding, research skills, skills of analysis and interpretation, the practical application of Computer Science in industry, business and research domains
  • To increase self-awareness and insight into both professional and ethical issues relevant to the discipline of Computer Science
  • To promote the vocational and personal development of students and ensure they have the basis for continuing professional development

 

  FHEQ Level 4 FHEQ Level 5 FHEQ Level 6
Demonstrate key skills required of the computing professional, comprising oral and written communication, along with an awareness of professional aspects of computing practice, including ethical, legal and social implications of computing. CO4201   CO6008
Demonstrate an understanding of theory and mathematics for computing towards the creation of effective algorithms and data structures. CO4202 CO5201  
Demonstrate an understanding of the technologies which underpin the internet and world-wide-web.

CO4224

CO4227

CO5227

 

CO6203

CO6227

Demonstrate knowledge of the factors that underpin human computer interaction, in particular aspects affecting the user experience.

CO4210

 

 

CO6202

CO6210

Demonstrate knowledge of core principles of design and implementation of software, including common programming paradigms such as object orientation and imperative programming. CO4225 CO5225

CO6204

CO6225

Demonstrate an understanding of computer architecture, operating systems and networking. CO4224 CO5302 CO6203
Demonstrate an awareness of data entities, structure, data querying and object relation mapping tools.

CO4222

 

 

CO5201

CO5222

CO5227

 
Demonstrate an awareness of the wider application of computer science.    

CO6202

CO6226

CO6202

The statements below indicates how the cognitive skills determined by the AQA Subject Benchmark Statements for Computing (2016) map to the modules within the programme.

 

 

FHEQ

Level 4

FHEQ

Level 5

FHEQ

Level 6

Demonstration and apply computational thinking.

CO4202

 

CO5201

CO5225

CO6225

 

Apply appropriate scientific methods. CO4201   CO6008
Consider professional implications of the development of computing systems. CO4201    
Analyse problems and be able to derive appropriate solutions.

CO4225

CO4227

 

 

CO5225

 

 

 

CO6008

CO6029

CO6201

CO6225

Model real world problems in a computational context. CO4222 CO5201 CO6227
Critically evaluate and reflect upon design and implementation methodologies.     

CO6008

CO6210

CO6225

CO6227

The statements below indicates how the practical skills denoted in the AQA Subject Benchmark Statements for Computing (2016) map to modules within the programme which teach those skills

The following outcomes are covered across the range of modules on the programme

  • Specify, design and construct reliable, secure and usable computer-based systems.
  • Use tools for the construction and documentation of computer applications, with particular emphasis on understanding the whole process involved in the effective deployment of computers to solve practical problems.

The following are covered by specific modules:

  FHEQ Level 4 FHEQ Level 5 FHEQ Level 6
Evaluate systems in terms of quality attributes and possible trade-offs presented within the given problem.

CO4210

CO4227

CO5201

 

CO6202

CO6210

Plan and manage projects to deliver computing systems within constraints of requirements, timescale and budget.   CO5019 CO6008
Recognise any risks and safety aspects that may be involved in the deployment of computing systems within a given context.

CO4201

CO4210

 

 

CO6210

CO6602

CO6203

The ability to critically evaluate and analyse complex problems, including those with incomplete information, and devise appropriate solutions, within the constraints of a budget.    

CO6008

CO6201

CO6210

CO6225

Self-management: self-awareness and reflection; goal setting and action planning; independence and adaptability; acting on initiative; innovation and creativity. The ability to work unsupervised, plan effectively and meet deadlines, and respond readily to changing situations and priorities.   CO5019 CO6008
Team working and management: the ability to recognise and make best use of the skills and knowledge of individuals to collaborate.   CO5019  

 

 

FHEQ

Level 4

FHEQ

Level 5

FHEQ

Level 6

Describe and discuss technological issues clearly and accurately both orally and in written work (all modules)

CO4201

(orally)

   
Be able to write for an academic audience (all modules)      
Ability to work as an individual and as part of a team.   CO5019  
Communicate fluently with members of a team.   CO5019  
Ability to communicate with multiple stakeholders in an appropriate way, in a variety of forms.   CO5019  
Ability to negotiate and compromise on possible solutions to software project problems.   CO5019  
Produce fluent and accurate written communication, based on clear and critical argument and evidence-based reasoning.   CO5019 CO6008
Fluent oral communication suitable for an academic audience.     CO6008

The MComp Computer Science, BSc Computer Science and Applied Computing share a common first year, with compulsory modules. At level 5 all modules are also compulsory.

The compulsory modules at level 6 are CO6008 - Innovation Project and CO6225 Programming III.

Mod-Code Level Title Credit Single
CO4201 4 Professional Skills for Computing 10 Comp
CO4202 4 Mathematics for Computing 20 Comp
CO4210 4 User Experience 20 Comp
CO4222 4 Databases I 10 Comp
CO4224 4 Operating Systems and Hardware 20 Comp
CO4225 4 Programming I 20 Comp
CO4227 4 Web Technologies 20 Comp
CO5019 5 Experiential Learning (Computing) 20 Comp
CO5023 5 Computer Systems and Networks 20 Comp
CO5201 5 Data Structures and Algorithms 20 Comp
CO5222 5 Databases II 20 Comp
CO5225 5 Programming II 20 Comp
CO5227 5 Web Application Development 20 Comp
CO6008 6 Innovation Project 40 Comp
CO6029 6 Software Quality 20 Optional
CO6201 6 Systems Analysis 20 Optional
CO6202 6 Computer Graphics 20 Optional
CO6203 6 Network Protocols and Methods 20 Optional
CO6204 6 Open Source Software Development 20 Optional
CO6210 6 Design Thinking for Innovation 20 Optional
CO6225 6 Programming III 20 Comp
CO6226 6 Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning 20 Optional
CO6227 6 Enterprise Web Development 20 Optional
CO6602 6 Cryptography and Security 20 Optional

  • 120 credits at Level 4 entitles the student to a Certificate of Higher Education
  • 240 credits by the end of Level 5 entitles the student to a Diploma of Higher Education
  • 360 credits by the end of Level 6 entitles the student to a Bachelor’s degree

In order to progress from level 4 to 5 a maximum of 20 credits may be compensated. (IET Accreditation Guidance R3a April 2016)

Where modules include two assessment modes (coursework and examination) that assess different Learning Outcomes a pass threshold should be adopted for each mode that contributes more than 30% to the overall module mark, with this pass threshold no more than 10% below the normal module pass mark. (IET Accreditation Guidance G1 April 2016)

As per the IET Policy for Accreditation of New or recently Introduced Programmes, it is envisaged that the application for accreditation will be made once the first set of students reach their final year. Accreditation, if conferred, will be subject to a 'First Output Review' by the IET

The level of accreditation applied for will be IEng - This is professional recognition as a Incorporated Engineer.

Further to course accreditation, Students also need to become a paying member of a recognising body (e.g. IET, BCS) then apply for IEng status, paying the appropriate fee.

For admission, each of the following must be obtained:

  • 120 UCAS points
  • A-level in Computer Science, Computing or Mathematics at grade C or above
  • GCSE Mathematics at grade C or above

The University has a strategy for Widening Access and Participation and seeks to recruit students from backgrounds and areas which might not be viewed as 'traditional'. Applicants who do not meet the above criteria, but for example, have prior experience such as time spent working in a related field will be subject to individual consideration.

For international entry requirements, you will need to visit http://www.chester.ac.uk/international/your-country and select the appropriate country.

The subject benchmark statement for Computing (2016, section 2.16) does not include content or outcomes, rather it makes recommendation as to bodies which do. In recognition of this, the content and outcomes for the modules within this programme have been developed in light of the ACM Computer Science Curricula 2013.

Learning

Level 4: Learning is predominantly tutor-designed and guided, and students are offered opportunities for individual initiative within this framework, which provides groundwork in subject-specific and transferable study skills and encouragement to communicate accurately. There is a bias towards workshop and lab-based teaching as opposed to lectures

Level 5: Learning remains largely tutor-guided and students are encouraged to work in collaboration with tutors and fellow students. There is opportunity for consolidation and development of appropriate study skills and for experiencing a range of appropriate methods for tasks in hand. A 20 credit experiential learning module at level five provides opportunity for practical engagement with real-world projects from industry.

Level 6: Students develop a greater responsibility for their own learning, both independent and collaborative. There is a consolidation of appropriate study skills and their application to independent enquiry in the form of a major individual research development project.

Summative Assessments 

Opportunities for the student to demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes are provided through the following summative assessment methods:

  • Written Examinations are typically 90 minutes or less in duration.  The content of these exams is previously unseen by the student, and many modules use written exams to assess knowledge and understanding, and selected subject-specific intellectual skills.  Different modules will use open or closed book, multiple choice, open-ended and essay type exams as appropriate to the subject matter.
  • Coursework Assignments are used throughout the curriculum where students are required to seek additional information so that they can develop and demonstrate their understanding of the course material.  The exact form of assignment reflects the subject matter.  In particular, practical implementations are used where the attainment of a subject specific practical skill is relevant. Reports are used where the use of primary source material and some form of evaluation or analysis is required. Coursework may constitute the only or the major form of assessment in some modules, and can be conducted on an individual basis at the beginning of the degree programme, or as small groups. 
  • Oral Presentations are often included as part of coursework assignments.  These presentations allow students to develop their communication skills.
  • Peer Assessment is often used in modules that involve a substantial team-working element.  Normally, students will moderate the final marks for the group project to reflect the contributions of different team member to encourage full an equal participation by each student.  Students may also peer review other students' coursework to develop their critical thinking skills, but in this case, the quality of the peer review is assessed.
  • The Innovation Project is the largest project and is undertaken during the third year of the degree programme with students working individually on an innovative technology product for a real client.  The project is assessed via a written report, the practical implementation, an oral presentation and the student’s response to questions. It is expected to be at a professional level.

Assessment Criteria

There are clear assessment criteria and a marking scheme for every assessment. Marking schemes identify levels of performance against specific learning outcomes. They indicate how the final mark will be derived, and are designed to facilitate second marking and constructive feedback to students from the tutor.

 

Formative Assessments do not contribute to the final marks achieved for each module, but provide an opportunity for students to monitor their own academic progress.  They also provide a useful opportunity for lecturers to give feedback to the students and to monitor and improve the students learning experience. Students will have opportunities to develop their oral and presentation skills during workshops.

A graduate of this programme will be able to solve problems and communicate solutions across a broad range of areas within computing, and will be able to evaluate and analyse alternatives from a number of theoretical models.

On completion of their study a graduate will be able to enter a range of careers, typically:

  • Software Developer
  • Software Test Engineer
  • Software Engineer
  • Software Architect
  • Programmer Analyst
  • Systems Developer
  • Web Developer
  • Application Support Analyst
  • Computer Systems Analyst
  • Database Administrator
  • Systems Administrator
  • Systems Engineer
  • Systems Analyst
  • Network Administrator
  • Network Engineer

The University is committed to the promotion of diversity, equality and inclusion in all its forms; through different ideas and perspectives, age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. We are, in particular, committed to widening access to higher education. Within an ethically aware and professional environment, we acknowledge our responsibilities to promote freedom of enquiry and scholarly expression. 

The programme is delivered in English and provided the student has attained the defined standard there are no other cultural issues.

As a technology-oriented degree, there is a high likelihood that the majority of disabilities can be addressed using appropriate specialist hardware and software; individual applicants will be invited to discuss their individual needs with the programme leader and the applicant will be advised as to the provision that can be made for them, prior to accepting a place.

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